Corticosteroids for COVID-19: New Evidence of Benefit
A conversation with Jonathan A. C. Sterne, MA, MSc, PhD, of the University of Bristol, Todd W. Rice, MD, MSc, of Vanderbilt University, and Janet V. Diaz, MD, of the World Health Organization (WHO) on the latest research supporting the use of hydrocortisone and dexamethasone for treatment of COVID-19 ARDS. Recorded September 2, 2020. Related Article(s): Effect of Hydrocortisone on 21-Day Mortality or Respiratory Support Among Critically Ill Patients With COVID-19 (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - September 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Coronavirus Update From the WHO
Soumya Swaminathan, MD, DNB, chief scientist at the World Health Organization (WHO), discusses the global coronavirus pandemic and the WHO response. Recorded August 5, 2020. Related Article: COVID-19 Reveals Urgent Need to Strengthen the World Health Organization (Source: JAMA Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - August 7, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

Fighting COVID-19 vaccine fears, tracking the pandemic ’s origin, and a new technique for peering under paint
Science Editor-in-Chief Holden Thorp joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his editorial on preventing vaccine hesitancy during the coronavirus pandemic. Even before the current crisis, fear of vaccines had become a global problem, with the World Health Organization naming it as one of the top 10 worldwide health threats in 2019. Now, it seems increasingly possible that many people will refuse to get vaccinated. What can public health officials and researchers do to get ahead of this issue? Also this week, Sarah talks with Science Senior Correspondent Jon Cohen about his story on Chinese scientist Shi Zhengli, the bat resea...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How effective is quarantine alone or combined with other public health measures to control coronavirus (COVID-2019)?
Coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19, has spread quickly throughout the world, and Cochrane is producing a series of rapid reviews of the evidence to help decision makers respond to the pandemic. In this podcast, lead author, Barbara Nussbaumer-Streit from Danube University Krems in Austria outlines the findings of our review of the effectiveness of quarantine, which was requested by the World Health Organization and published in early April 2020. (Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library)
Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library - April 8, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cochrane Source Type: podcasts

Quarantine alone or in combination with other public health measures to control COVID-19: a rapid review
Coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19, has spread quickly throughout the world, and Cochrane is producing a series of rapid reviews of the evidence to help decision makers respond to the pandemic. In this podcast, lead author, Barbara Nussbaumer-Streit from Danube University Krems in Austria outlines the findings of our review of the effectiveness of quarantine, which was requested by the World Health Organization and published in early April 2020. (Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library)
Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library - April 8, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cochrane Source Type: podcasts

The psychology and psychiatry of pandemics
The World Health Organization (WHO) characterised COVID-19 as a pandemic on 11 March 2020 and countries around the world are putting measures in place to combat the spread of coronavirus. How do psychological factors influence the spread of pandemic infection and the associated emotional distress and social disruption? In this podcast, Dr Raj Persaud talks to Professor Steven Taylor about his recently published book offering a comprehensive analysis of the psychology of pandemics. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - March 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts

27 June 2019: Callused feet, and protein-based archaeology
This week, how going barefoot affects what your feet can feel, and uncovering history with ancient proteins.In this episode:00:44 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole08:50 Research HighlightsMagma moving quickly, and twice-transforming 4D materials. Research Highlight: Volcano’s magma hit top speed; Research Article: Wang et al.11:09 Dating fossils with proteinsArchaeologists turn to proteins to answer questions DNA cannot. News Feature: Move over, DNA: ancient protei...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

27 June 2019: Callused feet, and protein-based archaeology
This week, how going barefoot affects what your feet can feel, and uncovering history with ancient proteins.In this episode:00:44 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive.Research article:Holowka et al.;News and Views:Your sensitive sole08:50 Research HighlightsMagma moving quickly, and twice-transforming 4D materials.Research Highlight:Volcano ’s magma hit top speed;Research Article:Wang et al.11:09 Dating fossils with proteinsArchaeologists turn to proteins to answer questions DNA cannot.News Feature:Move over, DNA: ancient proteins are st...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Counterfix" -- The Discovery Files
A new, simple technique developed by engineers from the University of California, Riverside, can detect fake drugs from a video taken as a sample undergoes a disturbance. The researchers report they have used an algorithm-based technology, called "chronoprinting," which requires only a few relatively inexpensive pieces of equipment and free software to accurately distinguish pure from inferior food and medicines. The World Health Organization says that about 10 percent of all medicines in low- and middle-income countries are counterfeit, and food fraud is a global problem that costs consumers and industry billion...
Source: The Discovery Files - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Have we misunderstood TB's timeline?
The number of people estimated to be latently infected with TB - that is infected with TB, which has not yet manifested symptoms - is around 2 billion. That is 1 in 3 people on the planet are infected by the bacteria. The World Health Organization ’s website notes that on average 5-10% of those infected with TB will develop active TB. That number... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - August 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

The accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests for detecting typhoid and paratyphoid (enteric) fever
Point-of-care rapid diagnostic tests which use a small amount of blood are available for infectious diseases such as malaria and HIV, and make an important contribution to patient management. Cochrane Reviews of the accuracy of such tests have influenced World Health Organization (WHO) policy and, in May 2017, they were added to with a new Cochrane Diagnostic Test Accuracy review of rapid tests for typhoid and paratyphoid fevers. Lalith Wijedoru from the  Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool in UK tells us more in this podcast. (Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library)
Source: Podcasts from The Cochrane Library - October 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Cochrane Source Type: podcasts

Future Earth - linking health and environmental research
The rapid changes in the global environment have led many scientists to conclude that we are living in a new geological epoch —the Anthropocene—in which human activities have become the dominant driving force transforming the Earth’s natural systems. A recent joint publication by the World Health Organization and Convention on Biological Diversity... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - June 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Should malaria be eradicated?
The World Health Organization, the Roll Back Malaria Partnership, and the United Nations, all have a vision of a malaria-free world. The world has already committed to malaria eradication, albeit without a target date. Bruno Moonen, deputy director for malaria at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, thinks that for malaria, eradication is the... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - March 7, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Ebola - why WHO's response failed.
In August 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the Ebola outbreak in west Africa a public health emergency of international concern, and the world scrambled to respond. The WHO received widespread criticism, and it was concluded that better preparedness and a faster, more coordinated response could have prevented most of the 11 000... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 7, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

DSM-IV Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Experience Type (JAMA Psychiatry)
Interview with Ronald C. Kessler, PhD, author of Association of DSM-IV Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Traumatic Experience Type and History in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys (Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews - January 4, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: The JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

JAMA Psychiatry : DSM-IV Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Experience Type
Interview with Ronald C. Kessler, PhD, author of Association of DSM-IV Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Traumatic Experience Type and History in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys (Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews)
Source: JAMA Specialty Journals Author Interviews - January 4, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: The JAMA Network Source Type: podcasts

ELCC 2016: The 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors: A pathologist’s view
At the 6th European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC), held in Geneva, Switzerland, from 13–16 April 2016, Keith Kerr, BSc, MB ChB, FRCPath, FRCPE, from the University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdo... Author: VJOncology Added: 06/07/2016 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors: A pathologist’s view
At the 6th European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC), held in Geneva, Switzerland, from 13–16 April 2016, Keith Kerr, BSc, MB ChB, FRCPath, FRCPE, from the University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdo... Author: VJOncology Added: 06/07/2016 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The WHO Updated Diagnostic Criteria for MPN
In this presentation from the 2016 "European Focus on Myeloproliferative Neoplasms and Myelodysplastic Syndromes", Dr. Tiziano Barbui discusses the updated World Health Organization (WHO) di... Author: imedex Added: 05/22/2016 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - May 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

The pattern of damage caused by Zika virus in the brains of 23 foetuses
In February World Health Organization (WHO) declared the microcephaly epidemic in South America an international public health emergency. Today, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the CDC, has confirmed that it ’s is Zika virus which is causing that microcephaly.  The outbreak was originally spotted in Recife, in Brazil, and it’s... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 14, 2016 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

The pattern of damage caused by zika virus in the brains of 23 foetuses
In February World Health Organization (WHO) declared the microcephaly epidemic in South America an international public health emergency. Today, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the CDC, has confirmed that it’s is Zika virus which is causing that microcephaly.  The outbreak was originally spotted in Recife, in Brazil, and it’s... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - April 14, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

" Cornge " -- The Discovery Files
Purdue researchers have identified a set of genes that can be used to naturally boost the provitamin A content of corn kernels, a finding that could help combat vitamin A deficiency in developing countries and macular degeneration in the elderly. Vitamin A deficiency causes blindness in 250,000 to 500,000 children every year, half of whom die within a year of losing their eyesight, according to the World Health Organization. The problem most severely affects children in Sub-Saharan Africa, an area in which white corn, which has minimal amounts of provitamin A carotenoids, is a dietary mainstay. Insufficient carotenoids may...
Source: The Discovery Files - November 14, 2014 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Steps to limit smoking in China could save 13,000,000 lives in 35 years
Complete implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) recommends policies in China that would prevent almost 13m smoking related deaths by 2050, suggests a paper published on bmj.com. China is home to about one third of the world ’s smokers and reducing smoking in China could have an enormous... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - February 17, 2014 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Why don't WHO guidelines on fluid resuscitation in children include the FEAST trial results?
Read the article: http://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.f7003 The 2013 World Health Organization guidelines continue to recommend rapid fluid resuscitation for children with shock, despite evidence from the FEAST trial that this can increase mortality. Katheryn Maitland, professor of tropical paediatric infectious disease at Imperial College London,... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - January 17, 2014 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Trade in generics
Jamie Love, Knowledge Ecology International, and Hans Hogerzeil, director of essential medicines and pharmaceutical policies at the World Health Organization (WHO), discuss the ongoing EU trade negotiations with India. They set out their concerns that it may lead to an interruption in the supply of new generic drugs to the developing world. (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - August 28, 2013 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Tackling NCDs in developing countries
Dan Chisholm, a health economist with the World Health Organisation talks to Harriet Vickers about a cluster of articles which examines the more cost effective way to tackle non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia. (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - August 27, 2013 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Deworming debunked
You may well assume that a programme supported by organisations such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization does what it says on the tin. However, it turns out this is not the case with deworming initiatives in countries such as Africa and India. Paul Garner, co-author of the Cochrane review on the topic, explains what's going on. And... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - August 27, 2013 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Tackling hypertension in India
The World Health Organization has chosen hypertension as the public health threat it will focus on for the next year. The problem is particularly pressing in India, and Anita Jain, the BMJ's India editor, spoke to Fran çois Decaillet, Coordinator for Health Programs, WHO India, about what needs to be done to tackle hypertension in the country's... (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - August 6, 2013 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Tackling violence against women
This week, the World Health Organisation called for healthcare providers to be more aware of intimate partner and sexual violence against women, calling it a "global health problem of epidemic proportions." We look into what doctors need to know. And we discuss advice on diagnosing and treating first trimester miscarriage. (Source: The BMJ Podcast)
Source: The BMJ Podcast - August 5, 2013 Category: General Medicine Authors: BMJ talk medicine Source Type: podcasts

Dengue
Dr Danille Esler talks about what GPs need to know about the clinical and public health ramifications of Dengue. The epidemiology of Dengue fever has changed in recent years and there has been a recent outbreak of the disease in northern Queensland. GPs can find out about recent outbreaks on the websites of the World Health Organisation, Centers for Disease Control and, in the case of outbreaks in Queensland, Queensland Health. Most commonly, Dengue presents as a debilitating illness lasting 7-10 days. The GP role involves exclusion of other illnesses such as malaria, appropriate diagnostic testing, monitoring for the deve...
Source: Australian Family Physician audio - October 31, 2009 Category: Primary Care Authors: The Royal Australian College Of General Practitioners Tags: Podcasts Source Type: podcasts

The psychology and psychiatry of pandemics
The World Health Organization (WHO) characterised COVID-19 as a pandemic on 11 March 2020 and countries around the world are putting measures in place to combat the spread of coronavirus. How do psychological factors influence the spread of pandemic infection and the associated emotional distress and social disruption? In this podcast, Dr Raj Persaud talks to Professor Steven Taylor about his recently published book offering a comprehensive analysis of the psychology of pandemics. (Source: Raj Persaud talks to...)
Source: Raj Persaud talks to... - October 24, 2006 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Royal College of Psychiatrists Tags: Science & Medicine Source Type: podcasts