U.S. Withdrawal From the World Health Organization: Unconstitutional and Unhealthy
Sarah Wetter (Arizona State University), Eric A. Friedman (Georgetown University), U.S. Withdrawal From the World Health Organization: Unconstitutional and Unhealthy, Assessing Legal Responses to COVID-19. Boston: Public Health Law Watch (2020) On May 29, 2020, during the same week that... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - September 27, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

"Bacon is a Killer": 1 daily serving of processed meat, such as bacon, increases risk of colorectal cancer by 18% - Physicians Committee PSA
According to the World Health Organization, eating even one serving of processed meat, including bacon, daily increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent. This public health awareness campaignis sponsored by The Physicians Committee —a nonprofit of 12,000 doctors.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZ1Va4NaU5E Posted atClinical Cases and Images. Stay updated andsubscribe, follow us onTwitter and connect onFacebook. (Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog)
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - September 24, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Food Vegan Source Type: blogs

Post #52 Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far by Paul Offit M.D.
Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far by Paul Offit M.D.I am admittedly a huge fanboy of Paul Offit, an infectious disease guru at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, one of the preeminent pediatric hospitals in the world. His latest bookOverall: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far, is a collection of medical facts that are already known to the well-read individual, but fly in the face of wrongly-held, out-dated, commonly-believed medical concepts. The majority of the incorrect information was previously considered the standard of care, but newer and better science and studies have clearly demonstrated ...
Source: A Pediatrician's Blog - September 24, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Virtue and Leadership in the World Health Organization
Guilherme Vasconcelos Vila ça, Virtue and Leadership in the World Health Organization, Ethical Leadership in International Organizations: Concepts, Narratives, Judgment and Assessment (Cambridge University Press, 2021 Forthcoming): In the public sphere, the language of virtues is often mobilized to assess the... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - September 23, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

The Most Reliable COVID-19 Online Resources: Your Ultimate Guide
In the era of fake news, mask naysayers and, dare we say, covidiots, relevant news often gets lost under the rubble of conspiracy theories and what not. 2020 already feels like a lucid fever dream as it is and we would be better off being well-informed by trustworthy sources of information. However, even leading authorities are lagging behind in this respect. The WHO only recently stopped releasing its daily PDF COVID reports in favour of an online dashboard. On the other hand, Johns Hopkins put one together in 3 days in January. It took the WHO 8 months since the first outbreak to have its own. The health authority als...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Digital Health Research Healthcare Policy Security & Privacy testing online resources digital technology applications covid covid19 Good Judgement Project WHO sewage data vaccine who dashboard worldometer Johns Hopkins JHU Source Type: blogs

Getting the best treatment for your fibromyalgia
Imagine being in pain and having your doctor tell you it’s all in your head. Unfortunately, this is not an uncommon experience for many of the six million Americans living with fibromyalgia, a chronic, painful condition. People with fibromyalgia experience widespread pain, aches, and stiffness in muscles and joints throughout the body, as well as unusual tiredness. No one knows what causes this condition, and no apparent physical cause has been identified thus far. The most likely culprit is a brain malfunction that amplifies normal nerve responses, causing people with fibromyalgia to experience pain or other symptom...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Bones and joints Fatigue Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

September 10th is World Suicide Prevention Day
Thursday, September 10, 2020 is World Suicide Awareness Day. Every 40 seconds someone in the world dies by suicide. This means suicide is responsible for almost one million deaths every year across the globe.Another way to look at this is how Dr. Catherine Le Gal ès-Camus, from the World Health Organization , describes the rate of suicide each year: "Worldwide, more people die from suicide than from all homicides and wars combined. "Click here for warning signs you can learn about. Psych Central offers a great list of suicide resources as does the ...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - September 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns suicide prevention Source Type: blogs

You had one job: the shortcomings of Public Health England and the World Health Organization during the Covid-19 pandemic
This report looks at the criticisms of the World Health Organization and Public Health England regarding their response to the Covid-19 pandemic. It argues that both organisations spread themselves too thinly over a broad range of medical, political and social issues, leading to a lack of focus.ReportInstitute of Economic Affairs - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - September 4, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Regulation, governance and accountability Source Type: blogs

Mosquito: more than a bug
Anopheles mosquito, a vector of Malaria   In one half of the world, the mosquito is seen to most as a minor annoyance, but for others, mosquitoes are synonymous with disease, pain, and death. Today is the World Mosquito Day and the perfect reminder of the devastating impact of such diseases as Malaria, Zika, and various kinds of Encephalitis for which mosquitoes are a major vector. Malaria – a headline disease Malaria is the headline disease associated with mosquitoes and it was on this very day in 1897 that Sir Ronald Ross discovered that female mosquitoes can transmit malaria between h...
Source: GIDEON blog - August 20, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Digital Health Makes Healthcare Globalised
Consider Atlas Biomed, the company behind the at-home microbiome test: it is based in the U.K. Some 1,900 kilometers away in Italy, Dante Labs offers direct-to-consumer whole genome sequencing kits. On the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, in the U. S., is Fitbit, which ships its fitness trackers around the world. Despite being headquartered in different countries and even in different continents, patients now have access to quality digital health services wherever they are (save for some shipping restrictions). This aspect of digital health heralds one of its lesser-explored advantages: it enables healthcare to be ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 18, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy digital health Source Type: blogs

Small Pleasures Are Just As Important For Our Wellbeing As Long-Term Goals
By Emily Reynolds When it comes to leading a happy and fulfilled life, many of us focus on long-term goals: what job we want, whether or not we want children, or how to reach a certain level of skill at a particular hobby or interest. There’s a reason so much research looks at how to achieve the things you value in life. As such, we often (try to) eschew short-term pleasures, deeming them a distraction from more loftier goals. But according to a study in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, the pursuit of those more immediate pleasures could be just as important for our wellbeing. The ability to enga...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Positive psychology Source Type: blogs

Maternal Mental Health: Mommy Brain?
Before having a child of my own, I spent 3.5 years working in a home based child abuse prevention program. I would screen new mothers for postpartum depression and help link them to mental health resources, while I was working on my master’s degree in social work to be a therapist myself. I would listen to them talk about “postpartum” when referencing their emotional state after giving birth and constantly heard the phrase, “I have mommy brain” or “I don’t know what’s going on with me, I’m not myself.” Never did I truly understand the weight of these phrases until...
Source: World of Psychology - August 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ashley Cory, MSW, LSW Tags: Parenting Pregnancy Women's Issues Motherhood postpartum depression Source Type: blogs

New insights on antibiotics use on crops amongst smallholder farmers
Philip Taylor and Robert Reeder, research scientists at CABI, did not start out looking for trends in antibiotic use in crops. In fact, both Drs. Taylor and Reeder’s primary interest at the start of their study was to simply understand the general use of agrochemicals and other agents by smallholder farmers in lower and middle income countries (LMIC).  What they found, however, as explained in their recently published article in CABI Agriculture and Bioscience, demonstrates how real-world data, drawn from community support networks, can unearth previously unknown uses of antibiotics which help protect the liveli...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - August 10, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: Dylan Parker Tags: Biology Developing World Uncategorized agriculture AMR antimicrobial resistance Source Type: blogs

Too Many Small Steps, Not Enough Leaps
By KIM BELLARD I was driving home the other day, noticed all the above-ground telephone/power lines, and thought to myself: this is not the 21st century I thought I’d be living in.   When I was growing up, the 21st century was the distant future, the stuff of science fiction.  We’d have flying cars, personal robots, interstellar travel, artificial food, and, of course, tricorders.  There’d be computers, although not PCs.  Still, we’d have been baffled by smartphones, GPS, or the Internet.  We’d have been even more flummoxed by women in the workforce or #Blac...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Tech Public Health Health Age Kim Bellard Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 Reveals Urgent Need to Strengthen the World Health Organization
Lawrence O. Gostin (Georgetown University), COVID-19 Reveals Urgent Need to Strengthen the World Health Organization, 323 JAMA 2362 (2020): From the time China reported a novel coronavirus to the World Health Organization (WHO) on December 31, 2019, it took barely... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 24, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus effect on other diseases
  The effect of coronavirus on the economy and our daily lives has been huge. COVID-19 has rightly dominated government and organization policies, social life, and media headlines so far this year – but are other diseases getting the right attention? Neglected diseases The World Health Organization maintains a department dedicated to the research and treatment of Neglected Tropical Diseases. These conditions are considered “neglected” by mainstream Medicine by virtue of a relative lack of impact and presence in Western countries. In January 2020, GIDEON listed 360 generic infectious diseases in huma...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 23, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Covid-19 and social protection in Europe and Central Asia
World Health Organization -This policy paper, written with the International Labour Organization and the United Nations Children ’s Fund, aims to help strengthen social protection. It makes the case that the crisis offers a moment of opportunity to expand and strengthen social protection mechanisms to safeguard health, well-being and livelihoods, leaving no-one behind in country response and recovery plans.ReportWorld Health Organization - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 16, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

How to Make the Most of Your Staycation During COVID-19
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is easy to feel powerless and isolated. Our inability to chat with friends and family face-to-face, grab a happy hour bite to eat with coworkers, and have a one-on-one with your boss has strained our already-tenuous balance between “work” and “life.” Zoom is now the new “office drop-in.” Emails, blogs, and newsletters flood our inboxes like there’s no tomorrow. While videoconferencing and calls can be helpful tools to stay somewhat connected and informed, they tend to sap a ton of our emotional and mental energy — a commodity that is in short ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Mental Health America Publishers coronavirus quarantine Relaxation Staycation Source Type: blogs

The Role of International Health Regulations in Combating COVID-19
Heidi Eissa (Cairo University), The Role of International Health Regulations in Combating COVID-19, SSRN: On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared coronavirus (COVID-19) “a global pandemic”. It infected nearly 5,568,271 people all over the world and killed... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Medical Misinformation in the COVID-19 Pandemic
Sarah E. Kreps (Cornell University), Doug Kriner (Cornell University), Medical Misinformation in the COVID-19 Pandemic, SSRN: The World Health Organization has labeled the omnipresence of misinformation about COVID-19 an “infodemic” that threatens efforts to battle the public health emergency. However,... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 12, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Daily decisions about risk: What to do when there ’s no right answer
Let’s face it: there’s still a deadly virus out there and it’s not going away anytime soon. And that means we all must make a lot of decisions that involve personal risk. And for many of these daily decisions, there’s no single right answer: no Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines, World Health Organization recommendations, or expert advice exist. And as more places lift restrictions keeping people at home, more questions arise: Is it safe to go to the grocery store? And, how often is okay? How safe is it to fly on a commercial airline? Get a haircut? Go out to dinner? Should I avoid a frie...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Infectious diseases Prevention Source Type: blogs

Bringing Ethics into the Global Coronavirus Response
Covid-19 is a matter of public and global health ethics, and the pandemic is currently accelerating cooperation within and contributions from these fields. A meeting on June 27, hosted by the European Union and Global Citizen, is the latest example another global pledging event on June 27, will include governments and large institutions, as well as individuals and communities worldwide. The post Bringing Ethics into the Global Coronavirus Response appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Coronavirus Global Response COVID-19 European Union German Public Health Competence Network Covid-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated World Health Organization Source Type: blogs

A Missed Opportunity for Universal Healthcare
Connie Chan Phuoc Le By PHUOC LE, MD and CONNIE CHAN The United States is known for healthcare spending accounting for a large portion of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) without yielding the corresponding health returns. According to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), healthcare spending made up 17.7% ($3.6 trillion) of the GDP in the U.S. in 2018 – yet, poor health outcomes, including overall mortality, remain higher compared to other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. According to The Lancet, enacting a single-payer UHC system would lik...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy AMA Arc Health Connie Chan Phuoc Le universal healthcare Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 8th 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 7, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Just what is the WHO and why does it matter?
As medical students with backgrounds in public health and global health care operations, we were shocked by the action on the part of the Trump administration to defund the World Health Organization (WHO). This decision undermines the global community’s progress in combating the COVID-19 pandemic and will ultimately cost the lives of thousands of individuals. […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 5, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pratik-doshi-april-banayan-and-oscar-chen" rel="tag" > Pratik Doshi, April Banayan, and Oscar Chen < /a > < /span > Tags: Policy COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Public Health & Source Type: blogs

The impact of COVID-19 on Africa
Since COVID-19 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, Africans have been told to stay put and“prepare for the worst.” Even though Africa is at a less advanced stage, WHO director-general Tedros Ghebreyesus indicates Africa, in particular, may suffer direct effects of the disease itself and indirect effects on the economy. Considering […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 3, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/yohannes-mengistu" rel="tag" > Dr. Yohannes Mengistu < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Towards a Better Understanding of Particulate Air Pollution and Dementia Risk
There is evidence for particulate air pollution to raise the risk of age-related diseases via mechanisms such as increased levels of chronic inflammation. While the burden of age-related disease varies widely from region to region, establishing the relative weight of specific contributions is a challenge. Poverty, particulate air pollution, high rates of chronic infection, and other environmental factors thought likely to lead to a greater risk of age-related disease all tend to overlap to some degree. Thus while there are plausible mechanisms for particulate air pollution to spur chronic inflammation and thus speed...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 1, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Bracing for contact tracing
What should you do if you get a call from a contact tracer letting you know you’ve been exposed to someone who tested positive for COVID-19? Even our best efforts to stay well — by maintaining distance, washing hands often, restricting the size of our social circles, and wearing masks — may not keep the virus at bay as cities and towns lift restrictions. That’s why many experts recommend three combined approaches to help prevent a dangerous resurgence of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths from COVID-19: continued mitigation efforts, which includes preventive strategies like those described abo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Nurses deserve all the respect doctors and patients can muster
Every year, National Nurses Day is celebrated on May 6 to raise awareness of the role nurses play in society. The date also marks the beginning of National Nurses Week, which begins on May 6 and ends on May 12, Florence Nightingale ’s birthday. In addition to the annual celebration, the World Health Organization has smartly […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/john-bishop" rel="tag" > John Bishop, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Nursing Orthopedics Source Type: blogs

Preventing and managing the Covid-19 pandemic across long-term care services in the WHO European Region
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe - This technical guidance identifies ten policy objectives for decision-makers, policy-makers and national or regional health authorities as they strive to prevent and manage the COVID-19 pandemic in long-term care settings. The focus is on older people above the age of 65 years who use long-term care services in their homes, day centres or designated facilities (residential homes and nursing homes).GuidancePress release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - May 28, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Social care Source Type: blogs

Planning for Future Pandemics Including Smallpox Outbreaks: Interview with Dr. Phil Gomez, CEO, SIGA Technologies
The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant global consequences, with healthcare systems stretched to their limits, a growing death toll, and economic devastation as economies came grinding to a halt. The pandemic and its aftereffects will be with us for some time to come, but this isn’t the first pandemic humanity has weathered, and it won’t be the last. Given accelerating advances in medical technology, there is plenty to discuss in terms of how we can be better prepared for the next infectious disease event. While COVID-19 is widely thought to have arisen naturally through transmission between an animal ...
Source: Medgadget - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

The Second Wave: Coronavirus & Mental Health
The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - May 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Report from Sub-Saharan Africa: “When the Health Fundamentals are Weak, Covid Will Expose You.”
The cries of millions of people in Sub-Saharan Africa and in low- and middle-income countries elsewhere who are struggling to stay alive because of Covid-19 and the lockdowns call for us to revisit the conceptual framework of the human right to health. The post Report from Sub-Saharan Africa: “When the Health Fundamentals are Weak, Covid Will Expose You.” appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum human rights syndicated World Health Organization Source Type: blogs

Competencies for nurses working in primary health care
World Health Organization - This document provides guidance and inspiration for policymakers, instructors, managers and clinicians who are seeking to develop and secure competencies among their nursing workforce in primary care. These should be adjusted to each country ’s context.DocumentPress release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - May 13, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Developments in primary and community care Workforce and employment Source Type: blogs

Do adults really need tetanus booster shots?
If you haven’t had a tetanus booster shot in the past decade, your doctor may recommend getting one. Many people think of a tetanus shot as something you only need if you step on a rusty nail. Yet even in the absence of a puncture wound, this vaccine is recommended for all adults at least every 10 years. But why? A group of researchers recently questioned whether you need to repeat tetanus vaccines on a regular schedule. What is a tetanus booster? Booster shots are repeat vaccinations you receive after your first series of immunizations as a child. Protection from certain vaccines can wane over time, which is why doc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sara W. Dong, MD Tags: Health Men's Health Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs

The Profound Meaning of Nurses' Week During a Pandemic: Nurses Show Up
Nurses'Week is upon us, and May 12th, 2020 is the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Florence Nightingale, the veritable progenitor of the modern profession of nursing. Meanwhile, we also find ourselves in the middle of the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife as declared late in 2019 by the World Health Organization (WHO), the healthcare arm of the United Nations. Add to this the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and we have a recipe for a very profound moment when it comes to nurses and the nursing profession in this global context.Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels.comThe International Year of the Nurse and Midwi...
Source: Digital Doorway - May 11, 2020 Category: Nursing Tags: healthcare nursing nursing care nursing careers nursing history nursing practice nursing roles pandemic Source Type: blogs

How to Unglue Yourself from the News During this Pandemic
The media we consume daily has an impact on our thinking, behavior, and emotions. If you’ve fallen into a pattern of regularly watching or listening to the news, the majority of what you’re consuming is likely about the coronavirus crisis. While staying up to date on local and national news, especially as it relates to mandates and health updates, is critical during this time, experts say over-consumption of the news can take a toll on your physical, emotional, and mental health. With that in mind, the goal is to find the balance between feeling informed and educated on the situation at hand while not becoming...
Source: World of Psychology - May 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emily Waters Tags: General Self-Help anxiety coronavirus COVID-19 News Media pandemic stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Will This Novel Virus Revive Older Ones?
Jeffrey A. SingerAs I recently wrotehere, and spoke abouthere, bans on elective surgery invoked by governors across the country in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have caused many people to suffer and even possibly face fatal consequences due to delays in necessary medical care. But there are other reasons why the public health emergency has the potential to generate secondary public health crises.In some cases people are avoiding doctors ’ offices and emergency rooms because they worry about handling theexpense at a time they have seen their income, and perhaps their savings, vanish during the current ec...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 9, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

A Multinational Effort to Reduce Neonatal Mortality: Interview with Dr. Maria Oden, Co-director of Rice 360 ° Institute for Global Health
According to the World Health Organization, 47% of childhood deaths worldwide occur in the first four weeks of life. This neonatal mortality rate is particularly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, where nearly one million newborns die every year. Many of these deaths can be prevented with medical devices that more developed countries often take for granted, such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), phototherapy lights, and temperature monitors. However, solving the problem is not as simple as donating equipment; these devices are often too complicated to operate by limited staff, too resource-intensive to use, o...
Source: Medgadget - May 7, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Education Exclusive Pediatrics Public Health Source Type: blogs

Can AI and radiographs help in resource-poor areas for the fight against COVID-19?
Conclusion  With new evidence emerging every day and with COVID-19 guidance and protocols adapting responsively, the national responses vary widely across the globe. However, Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea have shown that aggressive and proactive testing plays a crucial role in containing the spread of the disease.  We believe AI has great potential for helping doctors quantify and monitor COVID progression from a patient’s chest X-rays – this will help determine treatment pathways faster and thus slow any surges in emergency cases. AI will also play a critical role in expanding screening for...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Tech bhargava reddy manoj tld pooja rao preetham srinivas qure.ai tarun raj Source Type: blogs

How Can Parents Help Teach Generation Z Teens about Living in Uncertain Times?  
The prolonged health and safety stressors of COVID-19 has many parents reaching out to mental health professionals with concern over their teenagers’ increased levels of anxiety. In the United States, teenagers already experience higher rates of anxiety disorders than any previous generation in history. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, the prevalence of anxiety disorders among adolescents aged 13-18 is 31.9%, with females at a higher rate (38%) than males (26.1%). Some teen anxiety is normal due to typical teen life stressors, including friends and family dynamics, self-identity, body image, ach...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Susan Zinn, LPCC, LMHC, NCC Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Child Development Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 Emotional Development pandemic Uncertainty Source Type: blogs

It Is Time to Radically Shift Our Perspective About Nonadherence
The End of Nonadherence Improving patient adherence has been a decades-long priority for nearly every health care stakeholder1—except for patients. It is well known that poor medication adherence is responsible for both avoidable spending and avoidable poor health outcomes—yet there have not been adherence marches in the streets demanding that people take their medication as prescribed. Whether or not we as providers choose to hear them, patients are telling us: Nonadherence is a system failure, not a patient problem. In a recent article for Academic Medicine, we introduce the IDEAS framework for optimal tea...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 5, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective adherence health care health system patient centered care Source Type: blogs

BMC ’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic – we ’re here for you
We are living through unprecedented times. As a publisher whose portfolio covers most biomedical and health disciplines, many of our researchers may be on the front lines of understanding and responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and its aftermath. We are here for you, whatever you are currently dealing with – both in your research and personal lives. Accessing the latest COVID-19 research BMC is a fully open access publisher and all our articles are immediately and permanently available for free under a creative commons license. Our publisher, Springer Nature is committed to supporting the global response to emerging ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - May 5, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mithu Lucraft Tags: Open Access Publishing Technology covid-19 open data Source Type: blogs

False certainty and blanket statements: Not even the WHO is immune
The World Health Organization (WHO) says there is currently“no evidence” showing that people who have recovered from the coronavirus are not at risk of becoming infected again.“Some governments have suggested that the detection of antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, could serve as the basis for an‘immunity passport’ or […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jesse-oshea" rel="tag" > Jesse O'Shea, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Lessons from Zika in the Era of COVID-19
By CHADI NABHAN, MD, MBA, FACP If you are a soccer fan, watching the FIFA World Cup is a ritual that you don’t ever violate. Brazilians, arguably more than any other fans in the world, live and breathe soccer—and they are always expected to be a legitimate contender to win it all. Their expectations are magnified when they are the host country, which was the case in 2014. Not only did the Germans destroy Brazilian World Cup dreams, but less than a year after a humiliating loss on their turf, Brazilians began dealing with another devastating blow: a viral epidemic. Zika left the country scrambling to understa...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Chadi Nabhan epidemic Pandemic Zika Source Type: blogs

Responsible Reporting Is Vital In Media Coverage Of Suicide
Exactly how the media discusses suicide is a topic of frequent debate. Plenty of research has linked media reporting  of suicide with an increase in suicidal behaviour, and both the Samaritans and the World Health Organization (WHO), amongst others, have clear (and frequently promoted) guides for journalists on how to report suicide. But such guidelines are often ignored in favour of insensitivity or sensationalism — especially when the person at hand is a celebrity. Take the recent coverage of the death of Caroline Flack: explicit, deeply intimate details were plastered across tabloids for weeks, with seemingly...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Media Mental health Suicide/ self-harm Source Type: blogs

Neglected Diseases – Neglected Once Again
written by Dr. Stephen A. Berger For several years, the World Health Organization has been following a group of twenty-or-so Neglected Tropical Diseases. In the Developed World, these conditions are largely unknown to the general public, and even to physicians working in fields outside of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases. In only three months, the list of neglected diseases has grown to include more than 360 infectious conditions – all because of a single new viral disease called COVID-19. As of this morning, 287 cases of COVID-19 had been reported in the DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo) resulting in 23 d...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Diagnosis Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Research Provides No Basis for Pandemic Travel Bans
CONCLUSIONThe pre ‐​COVID‐​19 research is unanimous that governments cannot expect to rely on travel restrictions to prevent the spread of pandemics similar to influenza. Travel restrictions do not prevent the spread of disease and may only delay it for a few days or weeks if implemented prior to the interna tional transmission of the disease. The Trump administration’s travel restrictions waited until after the virus had already entered the United States, and they exempted many travelers from China, not to mention the rest of the world.[30]The research shows that the Trump administration should have kno...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 15, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

The COVID Pandemic: WHO Dunnit?
By ANISH KOKA, MD COVID is here. A little strand of RNA that used to live in bats has a new host.  And that strand is clearly not the flu.  New York is overrun, with more than half of the nation’s new cases per day, and refrigerated 18-wheelers parked outside hospitals serve as makeshift morgues.  Detroit, New Orleans, Miami, and Philadelphia await an inevitable surge of their own with bated breath.  America’s health care workers are scrambling to hold the line against a deluge of sick patients arriving hourly at a rate that’s hard to fathom.  I pause here to attest to the ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zoya Khan Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Anish Koka coronavirus Pandemic Sars-CoV-2 WHO World Health Organization Source Type: blogs