The Future Of Hearing: How Technology Might Turn Us Into Superheroes
The objective of medical tools for personal use started to go beyond measuring health parameters and vital signs, offering accurate, as well as easy and patient-friendly measurements. Lately, they are also coupled with aesthetic appearance. Elements of design thinking and UX become an ever more organic part of product development – and that’s also visible when looking at hearables. The trend also allows getting rid of societal stigmas bound with medical devices. Millions of people don’t want to wear hearing aids because it’s connected to aging and is perceived as being more dependent while signal...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 12, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine app artificial artificial intelligence ear hearing hearing aid hearing technology medical specialty otoscope smartphone superhero Source Type: blogs

World Mental Health Day 2019: Letter to a Suicidal Person
By the time you read this blog, two or three people will have taken their lives. In fact, every 40 seconds someone completes suicide; Close to 800,000 die by suicide every year. According to the World Health Organization, there are more deaths from suicide than from war and homicide together. Suicide is the second leading cause of death between people ages 15 to 29. These statistics don’t surprise me since I’ve lost two family members and several friends to suicide, and about one third of the people I know have lost a loved one to suicide. I am familiar with the desperation and rationale that leads someone to t...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Suicide World Mental Health Day Suicidal Thoughts Source Type: blogs

Helping Someone With Suicidal Thoughts: Reach Out to a Friend Today
Today is World Mental Health Day (#worldmentalhealthday) — a day to promote awareness of mental health issues. Just like physical health, we all have mental health. Whether we spend any time acknowledging or doing anything about it is up to each one of us. This year’s theme is a focus on suicide prevention. And despite it sounding somber and serious, suicidal thoughts are far more common than most people realize. In fact, research suggests most people have had at least a passing thought of suicide at least once in their life. The World Health Organization (WHO) encourages us to learn more about suicide prevent...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Suicide #worldmentalhealthday suicidal Suicide Ideation suicide thoughts Source Type: blogs

World Mental Health Day: 40 Seconds on Native American Suicide Prevention
Today is World Mental Health Day, created by the World Health Organization (WHO) to bring the international community together to focus this important public health issue. This year, the focus is suicide prevention: Working together to prevent suicide: A day for “40 seconds” of action. The campaign focuses on individuals and communities coming together to The post World Mental Health Day: 40 Seconds on Native American Suicide Prevention appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - October 9, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Editor Tags: On the Pulse Mental Health native american suicide Source Type: blogs

PrEP prevents HIV — so why aren’t more people taking it?
Each year, 1.7 million people globally are newly infected with HIV — more than 38,000 in the United States alone. This year, President Trump announced a 10-year initiative aimed at reducing new HIV infections in the US, and ultimately ending an epidemic that has plagued this country, and the world, since HIV first emerged in the early 1980s. A key part of that plan is pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP, a daily medication to help prevent HIV that is recommended for people at high risk. Recently, the FDA approved a new formulation of PrEP for many — but not all — of those at risk. What is PrEP and who should...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert Goldstein, MD, PhD Tags: Health HIV Infectious diseases Men's Health Sexual Conditions Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Who is the “ Real master ” in Master health check up clinics ?
Master health checks* , superficially look like a perfect modality to practice the greatest medical concept ie “Prevention is better then cure” .Let us detect all human diseases early , prevent its progression, regress it or completely cure it . Absolute bliss is it not? Why then articles such as this one should ever get published, that too in one of the prestigious journal of medicine? *Master health check .( Also referred to as annual General health checks.) While the title itself is provocative, it adds a tag line which is still more a shocker. There are specific well-researched reasons for this prevent...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - September 17, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Uncategorized master health check up medical ethics Source Type: blogs

Apple/ Eli Lilly ’s bet: Wearable and mobile consumer devices may well help us detect cognitive impairment and dementia
We describe how careful data unification, time-alignment, and imputation techniques can handle missing data rates inherent in real-world settings and ultimately show utility of these disparate data in differentiating symptomatics from healthy controls based on features computed purely from device data. The Study in Context: The FDA creates new Digital Health unit to reimagine regulatory paths in the age of scalable, AI-enhanced innovation Five reasons the future of brain enhancement is digital, pervasive and (hopefully) bright Mindstrong Health identifies digital biomarkers of cognitive function using smartphone data Neu...
Source: SharpBrains - September 16, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Alzheimers-disease Apple behavioral cognitive decline dementia Eli Lilly Evidation healthcare HIPAA mental-decline mild-cognitive-impairment physiological Source Type: blogs

Healthy, prosperous lives for all: the European health equity status report
This report reveals that health inequities in many of the 53 countries in the WHO European Region remain either the same or have worsened despite governments ’ attempts to address them. The report identifies five key risk factors that are holding many children, young people, women and men back from achieving good health and leading safe and decent lives.ReportWorld Health Organization Europe - press release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - September 11, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Streaming on Android Devices Now Available for Individuals with Hearing Loss
For people with hearing loss, use of a mobile or smartphone can be challenging and with limited options. While Bluetooth-connected hearing devices are available, these solutions impose a significant energy requirement that drains battery life. Most available Bluetooth hearing devices today do not allow users to have access to their mobile device for an entire day without requiring a recharge. For the past few years, Apple has offered the company’s users with hearing loss connectivity by directing them to hearing devices with Made for iPhone (MFi) technology, which also connect via Bluetooth. While this technology can...
Source: Medgadget - September 9, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: ENT News Rehab Source Type: blogs

Bad viruses travel fast: Measles vaccine important for travelers
(This post has been updated with relevant recent information.) The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. But we may be at risk for joining the UK Greece, Albania, and the Czech Republic, four countries recently stripped of measles elimination status by the World Health Organization. Since the beginning of 2019, more than 1,234 measles cases have been reported in 31 states, with active outbreaks in upstate New York and El Paso, Texas. New York has just declared the end of its yearlong outbreak, which required a massive public health response to control. Minnesota had a major measles outb...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs

Bad viruses travel fast: Measles vaccine important for travelers
The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. But we may be at risk for joining the U.K, Greece, Albania, and the Czech Republic, four countries recently stripped of measles elimination status by the World Health Organization. Since the beginning of 2019, more than 1,234 measles cases have been reported in 31 states, with active outbreaks in upstate New York and El Paso, Texas. New York has just declared the end of its yearlong outbreak, which required a massive public health response to control. Minnesota had a major measles outbreak in 2017. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs

September 10th is WORLD SUICIDE AWARENESS DAY
September 10, 2019 isWorld Suicide Awareness Day. Every40 seconds someone in the world dies by suicide. This means suicide is responsible for almost one million deaths every year across the globe.Another way to look at this is how Dr. Catherine Le Gal ès-Camus, from the World Health Organization , describes the rate of suicide each year: " Worldwide, more people die from suicide than from all homicides and wars combined. "Click here for warning signs you can learn about. Psych Central offers a great list of suicide resources as does the International Association...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - September 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness days suicide prevention Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 26th 2019
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How Maunakea Teaches Us to Practice Medicine
This study clearly highlights the need for Western-trained doctors to begin acknowledging and respecting each Indigenous community’s traditional knowledge and beliefs. Not working harmoniously with cultural traditions and what patients are comfortable with will erode trust and limit the health outcomes of patients. Dr. Kim Tallbear (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate), a genomics researcher and Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, has helped build a framework to model how Indigenous thought and concepts from Western science can come together. First, we must find ways in healthcare to “res...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Patients Arc Health Brooke Warren Hawaii Kana Oiwi Maunakea Phuoc Le traditional knowledge traditional medicine western medicine Source Type: blogs

World Health Organization Staff Continue their Efforts to be Irrelevant in the Matter of Human Aging
The World Health Organization (WHO) is not a group to be looking towards for leadership in the matter of treating aging as a medical condition. This is unfortunate, as the WHO propagates the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) that medical regulators use as a list of conditions for which treatments are permitted, and further has a fair degree of influence over government policy. If there is to be a summary of the WHO position on aging, it is that people should be wealthier, exercise more, and smoke less. Also more should be spent on compensating for the harms done by aging. There is no mention of treating aging ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Popular Science Publications Struggle to Grasp the State of Aging Research
As a rule, the journalistic community struggles to correctly represent any complex situation, community, or state of affairs. It is outsiders writing on a topic they generally know little of, under a deadline, and with few to no consequences attending mistakes and misrepresentations. To a journalist, any field looks like a confusing bristle of self-promoters and high-profile figures, all of them contradicting one another on points that require a good amount of technical knowledge to understand. It is the blind men and the elephant wherein some of the blind men have book deals to promote, or companies to talk up, and most o...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Learning to Let Go: Accepting a Helping Hand to Avoid Burnout
You're reading Learning to Let Go: Accepting a Helping Hand to Avoid Burnout, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. The World Health Organization has finally recognized burnout as a legit medical condition, thus distinguishing it from simply being tired or overworked. Burnout is much more than being temporarily exhausted due to an increased workload or responsibilities – it’s characterized by overwhelming stress, emotional fatigue, lack of motivation, feelings of detachment and cynicism towa...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RebeccaBrown Tags: featured happiness health and fitness burnout career advice mental health stress time management Source Type: blogs

Using Mindfulness to Combat Workplace Burnout
Mindfulness works while you’re at work. Burnout at work is now at national crisis level. The World Health Organization recently classified “workplace burnout” as a disease. Employers are searching for ways to decrease stress while increasing productivity and positivity. For many people, the workplace can be stressful and an unpleasant place to spend their days. Time spent there is considered just a necessity for making a living. 6 Signs That Scream Your Life Is Moving Too Fast Today, however, workplaces are striving to become more than places to put in one’s time, but instead, places to enjoy. One ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Mindfulness Publishers YourTango workplace burnout Source Type: blogs

Data From Germany Provide More Reasons For Policy to Shift From Prescription Pills to Harm Reduction
In February of this year, I co-authored a  paper in the Journal of Pain Research  explaining why there is  no correlation  between the amount of opioids prescribed and the incidence of non-medical use or prescription pain-reliever use disorder. That same month my colleague Jeffrey Miron and co-authors revealed similar findings in this Cato Institute  Policy Analysis.Now researchers in Germany have provided  more evidence to pour cold water on the idea of any relationship between the volume of opioid prescribing and the incidence of opioid use disorder. Publishing in the German M...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 29th 2019
In this study we show, for the first time, significant alterations in cholesterol efflux capacity in adolescents throughout the range of BMI, a relationship between six circulating adipocyte-derived EVs microRNAs targeting ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux capacity, and in vitro alterations of cholesterol efflux in macrophages exposed to visceral adipose tissue adipocyte-derived EVs acquired from human subjects. These results suggest that adipocyte-derived EVs, and their microRNA content, may play a critical role in the early pathological development of ASCVD. Commentary on the Developing UK Government Position on Hea...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Commentary on the Developing UK Government Position on Healthy Longevity
One option for patient advocacy for the treatment of aging as a medical condition is to petition governments and large international organizations such as the World Health Organization to adjust their positions on research funding and goals in medicine. This a fairly popular path, for all that I think it not terribly effective at speeding up the cutting edge of research and development. Large organizations of any sort are inherently conservative, and tend to get meaningfully involved in new fields of human endeavor only long after their support would have been truly influential. Nonetheless, numerous examples of gov...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Politics and Legislation Source Type: blogs

Health Reform Job One: Stop the Gouging! | Part 2
By BOB HERTZ We Need Legal Assaults On The Greediest Providers! When a patient is hospitalized, or diagnosed with a deadly disease, they often have no choice about the cost of their treatment. They are legally helpless, and vulnerable to price gouging. We need more legal protection of patients. In some cases we need price controls. Next in this three-part series, I discuss how we could challenge Big Pharma by lessening regulation of generic drugs, having the government take over production and establishing price review boards. Assault Phase Three – Challenge Big Pharma Step One – Less Regul...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Understanding the backlash to gaming disorder
The World Health Organization (WHO) recently announced the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases will have a new code: gaming disorder. For those who eagerly await play-by-play updates to ICD codes, this may be old information. Others may have noticed the brief, but sensational media blip created in June after a few news […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lindsey-migliore" rel="tag" > Lindsey Migliore, DO < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 20, 2019
This week’s Psychology Around the Net has the latest on a new virtual reality therapy trial for people diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, how people with mental health disorders are helping amend their descriptions in diagnostic guidelines, the issues that stop you from setting boundaries and how you can overcome those issues, and more. People With Mental Health Disorders Amend the Descriptions: What would happen if input from people who actually deal with mental health disorders on a daily basis was taken into consideration when it comes to the diagnostic guidelines describing said disorders? A new study set ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Addiction Cannabis cannabis dependency cannabis treatment Loneliness Nhs Procrastination Productivity Psychosis Setting Boundaries Shame virtual reality Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 15th 2019
In conclusion, we show here that sEVs are responsible for mediating paracrine senescence and speculate that they could be involved in inducing bystander senescence during therapy-induced senescence or aging. In fact, when compared to soluble factors, sEVs have different biophysical and biochemical properties as they have a longer lifespan than do soluble factors and they are more resistant to protease degradation. The idea that blocking sEV secretion could be a potential therapeutic approach to alleviate senescence "spreading" during chemotherapy-induced senescence or in aging tissues presents itself as a very at...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A home for the ages: planning for the future with age-friendly design
This report from RIBA and the Centre for Towns challenges the current failure in England to meet the need for housing that is suitable for the older generation. From making the current housing stock more accessible through to delivering specialised housing for people with significant care needs, there is currently a failure to build enough of all forms of age-friendly housing. Amongst the recommendations is that local authorities and health and wellbeing boards should draw up joint urban ageing strategies to address issues of active ageing in line with World Health Organization Age Friendly Cities principles.ReportPress re...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 15, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

The pros and cons of being a part-time physician
“Burnout” has been a buzzword circulating in the medical community quite a bit lately. The World Health Organization has just recognized the term as an official medical diagnosis as part of ICD-11. One moment you’re graduating medical school, full of hope and excitement for residency. The next moment, you’re overly stressed and working insane hours […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/passive-income-md" rel="tag" > Passive Income, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Becoming More Physically Active in Middle Age or Later in Life Improves Longevity
In conclusion, we showed that middle aged and older adults, including those with cardiovascular disease and cancer, stand to gain substantial longevity benefits by becoming more physically active, irrespective of past physical activity levels and established risk factors - including overall diet quality, body mass index, blood pressure, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Maintaining or increasing physical activity levels from a baseline equivalent to meeting the minimum public health recommendations has the greatest population health impact, with these trajectories being responsible for preventing nearly one in two deaths ass...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Understanding the distinction between universal health care and a single-payer system is critical
The World Health Organization describes universal health coverage— a system coupling health care access with financial protection for all residents— as the “single most powerful concept that public health has to offer.” The goal of universal care is to give all people the equal opportunity to enjoy the best health possible. I wholeheartedly […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/niran-s-al-agba" rel="tag" > Niran S. Al-Agba, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Policy Public Health & Washington Watch Source Type: blogs

From Chernobyl To Mars: The Future Of Radiation Protection
In the minutes after block 4 of the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl exploded, no one knew that they are experiencing a disaster that never happened anywhere before on planet Earth. The public health, environmental, and even the socio-political consequences were disastrous and we can still experience the negative impacts. That’s why we posed the question of what public health authorities, as well as individuals, can do to mitigate the consequences of radiation exposure, and what digital technologies are available for radiation detection. In this respect, after our investigations, it even turned out that it would be b...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Space Medicine astronautics chernobyl disaster fiction Health Healthcare Innovation mars nuclear power plant public health radiation radiation exposure radiation protection technology Source Type: blogs

Will We Be Born in 2050?
Being born and giving birth is full of pain, blood, and trauma. Many science fiction works, such as Brave New World, Matrix, The Island, or I am Mother imagine being brought to the world without actually being born in a mother’s womb. How far-fetched are these scenarios? Could the appearance of the artificial womb replace human mothers and natural birth in the future? How will we come into this world in 2050? Will we be born? The trauma of being born and giving birth The experience of being born and leaving the nurturing womb of our mother after more or less nine months is painful, bloody, and traumatic. Abrupt...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Science Fiction artificial artificial womb baby birth designer baby Health Healthcare Innovation mother sci-fi scifi society technology uterus Source Type: blogs

Will " Internet Addiction " Be Our Next " Crisis? "
This report from a respected media source can be expected to fuel more animated discussions about internet or social media addiction in the public square.As I pointed out in a  recent article at Reason.com, a meticulous examination of the evidence is crucial before concluding internet/social media addiction is an actual disorder. Such a determination may not just impact the fiscal stability of the health care system but, more importantly, may pose a potential threat to freedom of speec h. (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 17, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Brain health rests on heart health: Guidelines for lifestyle changes
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Environmental health inequalities in Europe: second assessment report
This report documents the magnitude of environmental health inequalities within countries through 19 inequality indicators on urban, housing and working conditions, basic services and injuries. Inequalities in risks and outcomes occur in all countries in the WHO European Region, and the latest evidence confirms that socially disadvantaged population subgroups are those most affected by environmental hazards, causing avoidable health effects and contributing to health inequalities.ReportWorld Health Organization - press release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - June 12, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Structural Stress and Its Effect on Care Provider ’s Health
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Last week, the World Health Organization (WHO) re-defined workplace burnout as a syndrome consisting of “feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion; increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job; and reduced professional efficacy.”  The change still does not define burnout as a medical problem and it is not new since it appears in the International Classification of Diseases version 10 as well. What it does is provide a focus on the increasing stress that we face by jobs that demand more time, effort and productivity...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Cultural Featured Posts professional ethics Public Health loneliness stress structural violence Source Type: blogs

Make Summer a Season of Safe Listening
School’s out for summer and kids of all ages will spend even more time listening to personal audio devices. That could mean an unsafe season lies ahead for their hearing. Noise-induced hearing loss is recognized as a global public health threat, so what better time than now for ASHA members to take the lead in spreading awareness about safe listening habits? According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than one billion young people are at risk for noise-induced hearing loss. Potentially damaging listening habits—too loud, too long, too often—remain a leading culprit for this risk. WHO’s co...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 5, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Joseph Cerquone Tags: Audiology Health Care Private Practice Slider hearing loss hearing protection Source Type: blogs

Proposed moratorium on human germline: Asilomar analogue?
The Editorial Board of The Washington Post (WaPo) recently published their opinion  on regulation of heritable genetic changes in human eggs, sperm, and embryos. The authors expressed some measure of relief that organizations such as the National Academies in the U.S., the Royal Society in Britain, and the World Health Organization are beginning to consider … Continue reading "Proposed moratorium on human germline: Asilomar analogue?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Genetics Health Care Asilomar bioethics biotechnology Françoise Baylis heritable genetic changes human genome editing moratorium Paul Berg reproduction syndicated Washington Post Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: June 1, 2019
Happy June, sweet readers! This week’s Psychology Around the Net is packed with information about exercise and anxiety (and it’s probably not what you’re expecting), the unhealthy relationship between self-worth and professional achievements, the new official definition of work-related burnout, and more. Can Working Out Make Your Anxiety Worse? Experts Weigh In: You probably associate exercise with anxiety in the way that exercise is a great way to manage anxiety, and that’s true — just not true for everyone. Holistic psychiatrist Ellen Vora, M.D. and gynecologist and obstetrician Anna Cabeca,...
Source: World of Psychology - June 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net achievements Anthony Rostain anxiety campus mental health Children chronic workplace stress college Emily Esfahani Smith Exercise Janet Hibbs kids military school counseling services self-worth Seth Source Type: blogs

Are certain types of sugars healthier than others?
Most people consume many different types of sugars from a variety of foods and beverages in their diet. A high intake of sugar is linked to an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers. But whether some sugars are healthier (or worse) than others remains a question of interest to many. Sugar basics Sugar provides energy that our cells need to survive. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, a macronutrient that provides energy (in the form of calories) from foods and beverages we consume. Carbohydrates are classified into two subtypes of sugar: monosaccharides, or “simple sugars...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vasanti Malik, ScD Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Is America Flourishing? A Key Question For Health Reformers.
The objective of good health is twofold – goodness and fairness; goodness being the best attainable average level; and fairness, the smallest feasible differences among individuals and groups.” In the age of Trump, with forced separation of immigrant mothers and children, criminalization of abortion, and purposeful obstruction of enhanced access to health care for vulnerable populations, it becomes impossible to ignore a significant modern-day truism. Health is profoundly political.  Health is a collection of resources unequally distributed in society. Health’s “social determina...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Obamacare Politics Trump Trump's Health Source Type: blogs

Emerging attempts to control gene editing
Recently, it was reported that the panel convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop standards and guidelines for gene editing will ask the WHO to establish a registry for any projects on heritable human gene editing.  The idea is that, to get research funding, a project would have to be registered, and there … Continue reading "Emerging attempts to control gene editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Sign our Letter to the G7 Today to Make a Difference for Youth Mental Health
Join Us: #ChangeDirection Want to make a difference in youth mental health? Sign on now to drive global collective action for youth mental health, as we petition G7 Leaders to make mental health a priority.  Help us get the word out. Share this with your friends and encourage them to join us in solidarity to demand action now by world leaders. Show the extent of the passion around the world for youth mental health. We must shine a light on the widespread but often “invisible” social and economic costs of mental illness, uniting mental health efforts around the world to mobilize political leadership. ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Children and Teens General Parenting Policy and Advocacy Adolescence G7 High School Youth Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Nurses are striking. Where are the physicians?
The U.S. health care“system” is completely and utterly broken. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. system ranks 37th in the world, all while spending dramatically more on health care than other wealthy countries. Tens of millions remain without any health insurance coverage. For many, medical bills can mean economic ruin — […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-pappas" rel="tag" > Michael Pappas, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Policy Public Health & Source Type: blogs

How Could Digital Tools Help Fight Against Anti-Vaccination?
Anti-vaccination movements lure increasingly more people into skipping potentially life-saving immunization against infectious diseases, such as measles, mumps, or rubella, highly impairing herd immunity for entire communities. Social media platforms could restrict the reach of anti-vax messages, groups, and activities, with algorithms recommending tailor-made content and health apps providing information about vaccinations. Here’s our collection of the most recent steps and digital tools supporting the fight against anti-vaccination and its believers. 300 percent increase in measles globally In a widely shared...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine anti-vaccination anti-vax anti-vaxxer digital disease disease outbreak facebook figth Health Healthcare infection Innovation measles movement social media technology Source Type: blogs

Measles: Correlation of Vaccine Uptake with Disease Rates
The following is a country-by-country analysis of measles reporting trends vs. vaccine uptake.  For purposes of consistency, incidence data and population statistics used to calculate rates per 100,000 will be limited to those published by the World Health Organization (WHO).  Resultant graphs were generated by Gideon and abstracted from the Gideon e-book series [1,2]  True estimates of vaccination update statistics are those published by WHO, in most cases available only since 1980.  Data published by the countries themselves were not used, to avoid possible bias or inconsistency when comparing data am...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 2, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs Outbreaks ProMED Source Type: blogs

Baby boomers and hepatitis C: What ’s the connection?
Hepatitis C is a viral infection that is spread through contact with infected blood. Hepatitis C infection can be short-term (acute) or long-term (chronic). Most people with acute hepatitis C eventually develop chronic hepatitis C. Hepatitis C usually does not cause symptoms, which is why most people with hepatitis C don’t know that they are infected. Left untreated, hepatitis C can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure. Why screen baby boomers for hepatitis C? Why are we recommending screening of adults in the baby boomer generation? To understand this, it’s worth reviewing how we got here. In 199...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raymond Chung, MD Tags: Health Healthy Aging Infectious diseases Screening Source Type: blogs

World Health Organization Recommends Against Screen Time for Infants
Screen-time guidance is a first for the World Health Organization (WHO). As part of a larger report on the risks of physical inactivity and sleep deprivation for children under age 5, WHO recommends no solitary, sedentary screen time at all for infants up to age 1, and only an hour a day for children ages 1 to 5. Editor’s note: As always, children who use low- and high-tech augmentative and alternative communication devices (AAC) should continue to use them at all times—and in an interactive way. The guidelines say infants should get at least 30 minutes each day—spread throughout the day—on the...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 26, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Shelley D. Hutchins Tags: Audiology News Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Augmentative Alternative Communication Early Intervention Language Disorders Professional Development social skills Speech Disorders Technology Source Type: blogs

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(see:Startup uses phone, light and AI to detect cervical cancer)Israeli startup MobileODT has created the Eva System, which uses an Automated Visual Evaluation (AVE) algorithm that it says can detect cervical cancer by simply examining an image of the cervix (Courtesy) Israeli startup MobileODT has created the Eva System, which uses an Automated Visual Evaluation (AVE) algorithm that it says can detect cervical cancer by simply examining an image of the cervix (Courtesy) Israeli start-up MobileODT says it can detect cervical cancer more accurately and inexpensively than the standard colposcopy method used today, by creatin...
Source: Lab Soft News - April 18, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Source Type: blogs

Why Is the USA Only the 35th Healthiest Country in the World?
By ETIENNE DEFFARGES According the 2019 Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index, the U.S. ranks 35th out of 169 countries. Even though we are the 11th wealthiest country in the world, we are behind pretty much all developed economies in terms of health. In the Americas, not just Canada (16th) but also Cuba (30th), Chile and Costa Rica (tied for 33rd) rank ahead of us in this Bloomberg study. To answer this layered question, we need to look at the top ranked countries in the Bloomberg Index: From first to 12th, they are Spain; Italy; Iceland; Japan; Switzerland; Sweden; Australia; Singapore; Norway; Israel; Luxe...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Economics Health disparities Health Policy American healthcare Etienne Deffarges Mediterranean Diet Opioids world health Source Type: blogs