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'Wasabi receptor' for pain discovered in flatworms
(Northwestern University) A Northwestern University research team has discovered how scalding heat and tissue injury activate an ancient 'pain' receptor in simple animals. The findings, from a study of flatworms, could lead to new strategies for analgesic drug design for the treatment of humans. That planarian flatworms use the same molecular receptor as flies, mice and humans to detect potentially damaging or noxious stimuli from the environment shows a remarkable level of evolutionary conservation, the researchers say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NOW Health Group Inc. Expands Voluntary Recall of Ellyndale ® Nutty Infusions ™ Because of Possible Health Risk
NOW Health Group, Inc. (NOW), of Bloomingdale, Illinois, is expanding the voluntary recall of Ellyndale ® Nutty Infusions ™ Roasted Cashew Butter – Product Code E0540, Lot# 2125155, and Ginger Wasabi Cashew Butter -- Product Code E0541, Lot# 2124118, to include Roasted Almond Butter – Product Code E0545, Lot# 2124119, and Mango Chili Cashew Butter – Product Code E0542, Lot# 2125156. An FDA follow-up inspection of the Nutty Infusions supplier ’ s facility revealed these lots have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes ...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - June 16, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

NOW Health Group Inc. Expands Voluntary Recall of Ellyndale ® Nutty Infusions™ Because of Possible Health Risk
NOW Health Group, Inc. (NOW), of Bloomingdale, Illinois, is expanding the voluntary recall of Ellyndale ® Nutty Infusions™ Roasted Cashew Butter – Product Code E0540, Lot# 2125155, and Ginger Wasabi Cashew Butter -- Product Code E0541, Lot# 2124118, to include Roasted Almond Butter – Product Code E0545, Lot# 2124119, and Mango Chili Cashew Butter – Product Code E0542, Lot# 2125156. An FDA fol low-up inspection of the Nutty Infusions supplier’s facility revealed these lots have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fa...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - June 16, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Now Health Group Inc. Voluntarily Recalls Select Ellyndale ® Nutty Infusions™
NOW Health Group, Inc. (NOW), of Bloomingdale, Illinois, is voluntarily recalling its Ellyndale ® Nutty Infusions™ Roasted Cashew Butter – Product Code E0540, Lot# 2125155, and Ginger Wasabi Cashew Butter – Product Code E0541, Lot# 2124118 because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain ...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - May 4, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Trusting their instincts: Family finds help for laryngeal cleft
For some kids, the hospital can be a scary place, where even doctors with the best intentions poke, prod and serve up yucky-tasting medication. But for three-year-old Jack Steinberg, a visit to Boston Children’s Hospital is worth the trip from his home in Great Neck, New York. “No, it’s really fun,” Jack’s mother, Jessica, recently overheard him telling his older brother, Henry, who isn’t a fan of doctor visits. “They give you toys and stickers there!” Jack’s cheerful attitude seems at odds with his recent health challenges. In fact, says his father, Noah, “If you...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders Dr. Reza Rahbar laryngeal cleft Source Type: news

Malaria mosquitoes sensitive to horseradish
Researchers have taken an important step on the road to understanding the underlying mechanism of how and why animals can feel pain in connection with cold or heat. However, according to the study, temperature is just one triggering factor -- horseradish, mustard, cinnamon and wasabi have a similar effect. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Calbee North America Issues Allergy Alert On Undeclared Milk In Harvest Snap Black Pepper Snap Pea Crisps
Boardman, OR - Calbee is recalling 3,588 cases of Harvest Snap Black Pepper snap pea crisps are in 3.3 oz bags and have Lot Number MAR 31 17 0141 S. Harvest Snap Black Pepper snap pea crisps may actually contain Harvest Snap Wasabi Ranch snap pea crisps which contain dairy ingredients. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - November 28, 2016 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Have you ever had real wasabi? Probably not (video)
(American Chemical Society) Sushi wouldn't be the same without wasabi. But odds are that even if you have dined at a nice sushi restaurant, you probably haven't had real wasabi. That green paste may have a very real, very spicy kick, but it likely is made from a European horseradish. Speaking of Chemistry compares the real deal with the commonly used substitute found in most sushi restaurants, and explains the chemistry behind wasabi's burn. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/808HUaxP538. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Weirdest flavours from around the world revealed including Crobar
Ever fancied a wasabi-flavoured Kit Kat? As 'all natural' protein bar made with cricket flour launches in the UK, FEMAIL examines the other unusual snacks on sale in other parts of the globe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why You Should Thank A Caterpillar For Your Mustard And Wasabi
Eons ago, cabbage butterfly larvae and the plants they eat began an evolutionary arms race. The result: "mustard oil bombs" that give the plants, and condiments we make from them, distinctive flavors.» E-Mail This (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jessie Rack Source Type: news

NeuroBreak: Sarcasm Center and Wasabi Receptor
(MedPage Today) -- News and commentary from the worlds of neurology and neuroscience. (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - April 14, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

How The Science Of Wasabi Could Pave The Way For New Pain Meds
Scientists have modeled the stunning structure of the receptor in our bodies that jolts our senses when we eat sushi garnished with spicy wasabi -- and it turns out that this so-called 'wasabi receptor' may hold clues for developing new pain treatments. The receptor, a protein called TRPA1, resides in the cellular membrane of our sensory nerve cells. Not only does it detect certain chemical agents outside of our bodies -- from wasabi to tear gas -- but it also gets triggered by pain-inducing signals within our bodies from itches and inflammation. “The pain system is there to warn us when we need to avoid things tha...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

How The Science Of Wasabi Could Pave The Way For New Pain Meds
Scientists have modeled the stunning structure of the receptor in our bodies that jolts our senses when we eat sushi garnished with spicy wasabi -- and it turns out that this so-called 'wasabi receptor' may hold clues for developing new pain treatments. The receptor, a protein called TRPA1, resides in the cellular membrane of our sensory nerve cells. Not only does it detect certain chemical agents outside of our bodies -- from wasabi to tear gas -- but it also gets triggered by pain-inducing signals within our bodies from itches and inflammation. “The pain system is there to warn us when we need to avoid things tha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sushi Science: A 3-D View Of The Body's Wasabi Receptor
The same receptor on nerve endings that makes sinuses tingle when we eat wasabi plays an important role in the pain of inflammation. The first 3-D view of the receptor could lead to better pain drugs.» E-Mail This (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

First look at 'wasabi receptor' brings insights for pain drug development
In a feat that would have been unachievable only a few years ago, researchers have pulled aside the curtain on a protein informally known as the 'wasabi receptor,' revealing at near-atomic resolution structures that could be targeted with anti-inflammatory pain drugs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Salmon or Tuna Carpaccio with Wasabi Sauce
Sushi-grade salmon or ahi tuna will work nicely for this easy, delicate dish, and you don’t even have to be a whiz with a knife to make it. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - August 12, 2014 Category: Nutrition Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Salmon or Tuna Carpaccio with Wasabi Sauce
Sushi-grade salmon or ahi tuna will work nicely for this easy, delicate dish, and you don’t even have to be a whiz with a knife to make it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 12, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Source Type: news

Gardeners' Gems: Designer Crops That Will Wow The Neighbors
For the fashion-conscious gardener, here are the most colorful and flavorful new edibles. This year's picks include the indigo tomato, wasabi and a pineapple-flavored berry.» E-Mail This (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 13, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Salmon and Cucumber Tartare With Wasabi Sauce
A delicious fish dish that can be either an appetizer or a light supper.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - August 30, 2013 Category: Nutrition Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Recipes Cucumbers Seafood Source Type: news

What makes eating so satisfying?
Scientists are learning to enhance our enjoyment of food by analysing exactly how we experience it. So how do they deconstruct the multisensory interplay involved?There's no doubt that research into the elaborate multisensory interplay that makes eating and drinking so satisfying has resulted in a great deal of culinary fun in recent years. From dining-in-the-dark restaurants to Heston Blumenthal's introduction of popping-candy to Little Chef menus, edible celebrations of our growing scientific nouse in this area abound. Now there's even an unlikely collaboration between Heinz Baked Beans and those debonair self-styled &qu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 23, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Amy Fleming Tags: Blogposts guardian.co.uk Food & drink Features Life and style Food science Source Type: news

Wasabi fire alarm scoops Ig Nobel prize for Japanese scientists
An alarm that squirts essence of wasabi, yawning tortoises and an analysis of why people sigh have won Ig Nobel prizesHow do you wake a deaf person in the middle of the night if there's a fire? Squirt a cloud of wasabi at them, of course. For the Japanese researchers who came up with the horseradish-based alarm system, it was a lifesaving piece of work, but on Thursday night they entered the history books with the award of the Ig Nobel prize for chemistry.Their research was one of 10 areas celebrated at the 21st Ig Nobel prizes at Harvard University. The awards, a spoof on the Nobel prizes, which will be announced next wee...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 29, 2011 Category: Science Authors: Alok Jha, science correspondent Tags: Ig Nobel prizes Science prizes People in science World news US news Source Type: news