Retinal hemorrhages in abusive head trauma - Hellgren K, Fahnehjelm K.
Brain injuries due to abusive head trauma (AHT) in infants are not rare and they are probably under-diagnosed. Retinal hemorrhages (RH) constitute a cardinal symptom of AHT and AHT is the most common cause of RH in infants next to childbirth. Retinoschisis... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

A genetic mechanism for sexual dichromatism in birds
Sexual dichromatism, a difference in coloration between males and females, may be due to sexual selection for ornamentation and mate choice. Here, we show that carotenoid-based dichromatism in mosaic canaries, a hybrid phenotype that arises in offspring of the sexually dichromatic red siskin and monochromatic canaries, is controlled by the gene that encodes the carotenoid-cleaving enzyme β-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2). Dichromatism in mosaic canaries is explained by differential carotenoid degradation in the integument, rather than sex-specific variation in physiological functions such as pigment uptake or transport. T...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Gazda, M. A., Araujo, P. M., Lopes, R. J., Toomey, M. B., Andrade, P., Afonso, S., Marques, C., Nunes, L., Pereira, P., Trigo, S., Hill, G. E., Corbo, J. C., Carneiro, M. Tags: Evolution, Genetics reports Source Type: news

What Causes Free Peritoneal Fluid?
Discussion Peritoneal fluid is normal. It decreases the friction of the peritoneum covering abdominal and pelvic organs and helps to protect them and allow their movement. A normal amount of peritoneal fluid is expected on radiological evaluation. Increased peritoneal fluid is a continuum and is concerning as a wide variety of pathological causes are associated with it such as abdominal trauma and appendicitis. At the far end of the scale is ascites that is the accumulation of free fluid more than 25 ml. It is usually associated with abdominal distension but fluid must accumulate before distension can occur and therefore i...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 8, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Restoring light sensitivity using tunable near-infrared sensors
Enabling near-infrared light sensitivity in a blind human retina may supplement or restore visual function in patients with regional retinal degeneration. We induced near-infrared light sensitivity using gold nanorods bound to temperature-sensitive engineered transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. We expressed mammalian or snake TRP channels in light-insensitive retinal cones in a mouse model of retinal degeneration. Near-infrared stimulation increased activity in cones, ganglion cell layer neurons, and cortical neurons, and enabled mice to perform a learned light-driven behavior. We tuned responses to different wave...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nelidova, D., Morikawa, R. K., Cowan, C. S., Raics, Z., Goldblum, D., Scholl, H. P. N., Szikra, T., Szabo, A., Hillier, D., Roska, B. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

Long-term outcomes of pediatric traumatic cataracts and retinal detachments due to self-inflicted injuries - Felfeli T, Mireskandari K, Ali A.
PURPOSE: To report the characteristics and longitudinal visual outcomes of traumatic cataracts and retinal detachments in children with self-inflicted injury. METHODS: A retrospective case series of pediatric patients at a tertiary care center who sust... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Roche ’s Port Delivery System with ranibizumab shows positive phase III results in neovascular age-related macular degeneration
Basel, 27 May 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from the phase III Archway study, evaluating Port Delivery System with ranibizumab (PDS) in people living with neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). PDS is a permanent refillable eye implant, approximately the size of a grain of rice, which continuously delivers a customised formulation of ranibizumab over a period of months. The Archway trial met its primary endpoint, demonstrating that patient s with PDS who received refills every six months achieved visual acuity outcomes equivalent to those recei...
Source: Roche Investor Update - May 27, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s Port Delivery System with ranibizumab shows positive phase III results in neovascular age-related macular degeneration
Basel, 27 May 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced positive topline results from the phase III Archway study, evaluating Port Delivery System with ranibizumab (PDS) in people living with neovascular or “wet” age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). PDS is a permanent refillable eye implant, approximately the size of a grain of rice, which continuously delivers a customised formulation of ranibizumab over a period of months. The Archway trial met its primary endpoint, demonstrating that patient s with PDS who received refills every six months achieved visual acuity outcomes equivalent to those recei...
Source: Roche Media News - May 27, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

USC's Mark Humayun wins IEEE Medal for Innovations in Healthcare Technology
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) Mark Humayun, MD, PhD, director of the USC Dr. Allen and Charlotte Ginsburg Institute for Biomedical Therapeutics and co-director of the USC Roski Eye Institute, was awarded the 2020 Medal for Innovations in Healthcare Technology by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Humayun was honored for his pioneering work in engineering and utilizing prosthetic devices to treat retinal neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Retinal texture could provide early biomarker of Alzheimer's disease
(Duke University) Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a new imaging device capable of measuring both the thickness and texture of the various layers of the retina. The advance could be used to detect a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease, potentially offering a widespread early warning system for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Optina Diagnostics receives 510(k) clearance from U.S. FDA for its MHRC-C1, permitting hyperspectral imaging of the retina
MONTREAL, May 13, 2020 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) - Optina Diagnostics announces today that it received 510(k) clearance for its ophthalmic camera, the Mydriatic Hyperspectral Retinal Camera (MHRC-C1), by the U.S. Food and Drug Administrati... Devices, Ophthalmology, FDA Optina Diagnostics, ophthalmic camera, Mydriatic Hyperspectral Retinal Camera (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 13, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

GeographicAtrophyCollabortationWithCDR-Life
Boehringer Ingelheim Collaborates with CDR-Life to Develop Antibody Fragment-based Therapeutics for Geographic Atrophy, a Leading Cause of Blindness WorldwideThe collaboration with CDR-Life is the second strategic partnership within a year for Boehringer Ingelheim in retinal diseases, furthering the company ’s commitment to develop novel treatments and technologies for patients who have only inadequate treatment options Together the partners will advance CDR-Life ’s preclinical antibody fragments targeting a key pathway in geographic atrophy (GA)  (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - May 13, 2020 Category: Research Source Type: news

Rapid Review: Diabetic retinopathy screening during the COVID-19 pandemic, CEBM
People with diabetes (PWD) are included in the group at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) and have been advised to observe stringent social distancing measures.(1) This creates a difficult situation for PWD and their Health Care Providers (HCP) as PWD require an annual review including retinal screening as part of their screening for complications, which involves a physical visit to a community or hospital facility or an eye clinic. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Retinal ganglion cells that release GABA
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Stern, P. Tags: Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

A noncanonical inhibitory circuit dampens behavioral sensitivity to light
Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) drive diverse, light-evoked behaviors that range from conscious visual perception to subconscious, non–image-forming behaviors. It is thought that RGCs primarily drive these functions through the release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. We identified a subset of melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) in mice that release the inhibitory neurotransmitter -aminobutyric acid (GABA) at non–image-forming brain targets. GABA release from ipRGCs dampened the sensitivity of both the pupillary light reflex and circadian photoentrainment, thereby shiftin...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sonoda, T., Li, J. Y., Hayes, N. W., Chan, J. C., Okabe, Y., Belin, S., Nawabi, H., Schmidt, T. M. Tags: Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

Eat safe: The takeaway on takeout (and other food)
In the weeks  since the safer-at-home ordinance went into effect in Los Angeles, we’ve had to learn to do a lot of things differently. The ways in which we study, work, communicate and interact physically with each other have all changed dramatically.So too with how we eat and shop for food. Yet even with limited trips to the market  and most restaurants turning to takeout and delivery service, many of us still have questions about how to best handle the food we bring into our homes.We turned toCatherine Carpenter, a professor of medicine, nursing and public health at UCLA ’s Center for Human Nutrition and an expert ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news