Stressed by heat and humidity? Climate change will make it worse. More at NSF's The Discovery Files
NSF-funded researchers at Clemson University project that periods of extremely high heat are likely to double across the lower 48 United States by the end of this century. As temperatures rise, so will the incidences of heat stress.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 15, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Two black holes colliding and resulting gravitational waves
Visualization of two black holes colliding and the resulting gravitational waves that were generated. [Visualization: Carson Brownlee; Intel GR-Chombo simulation data: Pau Figueras, Markus Kunesch, Saran Tunyasuvunakool and Juha Jäykkä, Stephen Hawking Centre for Theoretical Cosmology.] (Date ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 14, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Dark Energy camera portrait of Centaurus A
The main lighting in this image, captured using the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope, is from the galaxy Centaurus A and the luminous glow is from stars. The image provides a spectacular view of the dark tendrils of dust that occlude the bright center of the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 13, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Molecular dynamic analysis of ion distributions around DNA strand
The charged ions that surround DNA molecules can dramatically affect its conformation, folding and dynamics. This visualization is from a molecular dynamics simulation of a DNA system where the electron density of the surrounding ions was critical to understanding how they might modulate the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 13, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Artist's rendition depicting Oculudentavis naga
(Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 8, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

After 24,000 years, tiny animals still live in Siberian permafrost. More at NSF The Discovery Files.
NSF-funded researchers from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville were astonished to find life-frozen in suspended animation-for some 24,000 years.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 7, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

New species of lizard preserved in amber
Amber preserved the complete skull, partial skeleton, soft tissue and scales of a new species of unusual lizard known as Oculudentavis naga, as well as inclusions of numerous insects of various sizes. [Research supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grants DEB 1657656 and DBI ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 7, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Comparison of Oculudentavis naga and Oculudentavis khaungraae
Oculudentavis naga (top) is in the same family as Oculudentavis khaungraae (bottom). The lizards' tapered narrow snout can have a deceptively beaklike appearance, an effect heightened by a well-developed crest. [Research supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grants DEB ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 7, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

CT scan and X-rays of unusual extinct lizard
Computerized tomography scans and X-rays reveal a well-preserved specimen of an unusual extinct lizard that represents a new species in the genus Oculudentavis. [Research supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grants DEB 1657656 and DBI 1701714.] Learn more in the Florida ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 7, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

The Atlantic Ocean takes thousands of years for a world cruise? The Discovery Files takes you there.
NSF-funded researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and MIT estimated the time it would take water to journey from the lower branch of the Atlantic to around the world's ocean basins.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 30, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Getting physical is good for your child ’ s body – and their brain, too.
A team of researchers at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School found regular physical activity has widespread, positive effects on a child's developing brain-their own unique connectome.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 24, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Anna's hummingbird generates sound like simpler wings of insects
(Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 23, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Kagome lattice imaged from a bulk material
This is the first example of a kagome lattice -- an arrangement of atoms in a pattern resembling a Japanese style of basket weaving called kagome -- imaged from a bulk (or 3D) material. The image of a crystal was taken at MagLab using a special scanning transmission electron microscope. [MagLab ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 23, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Microwaves traveling through sample inside an NMR magnet
This image represents how microwaves would travel through a sample placed inside a nuclear magnetic resonance magnet. Red represents high microwave intensity, blue represents low intensity and yellow is in between. [MagLab is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (grant DMR ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 23, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

Fossil pollen paints a picture of fast-paced human impact.
This week's Discovery Files Video highlights the pollen research of an international team of NSF-funded scientists who analyzed more than 1,100 fossil pollen records to understand how ecosystems have changed since the end of the last ice age--some 18,000 years ago.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 23, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video