How Cutting Down On Meat Affects Your Social Identity
By Emily Reynolds With increased concern about the impact of meat on our health and the environment, and an ever-expanding selection of meat-free products available to buy, popular interest in vegetarianism and veganism has steadily grown. But for those who want to cut down but aren’t quite ready to give up their burgers, there is a third way: flexitarianism. As a 2019 study from the University of Nottingham on red meat and heart health put it, you “don’t have to go cold turkey on red meat to see health benefits”, finding that halving the amount of red and processed meat eaten can have signific...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Eating Social The self Source Type: blogs

It ’s World Mental Health Day today: Let’s review how a healthy diet can promote mental well-being
_______________ Should you eat an apple—or a bag of Oreos? Go to McDonald’s—or the vegetarian restaurant on the corner? When we make these everyday food choices, many of us think first of our physical health and appearance. But there’s another factor we may want to consider in picking foods: their impact on our mental health. A growing body of research is discovering that food doesn’t just affect our waistline but also our moods, emotions, and even longer-term conditions like depression. Which makes sense, after all. Our brains are physical entities, running on the energy that we put into our ...
Source: SharpBrains - October 10, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness evidence mental health Nutrition well-being Source Type: blogs

Diet, Changing Desires, and Dementia
Last week saw the launch of a campaign (run by the group Vegetarian For Life) that seeks to ensure that older people in care who have ethical commitments to a particular diet are not given food that violates those commitments. This is, as the campaign makes clear, a particularly pressing issue for those who have […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ben Davies Tags: Decision making Ethics Health Care autonomy choice dementia End of life decisions Food and Drink identity medical ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Kilimanjaro Can Be Anywhere: How to Forget Excuses and Adopt a Healthy Lifestyle
You're reading Kilimanjaro Can Be Anywhere: How to Forget Excuses and Adopt a Healthy Lifestyle, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. It's far too easy to come up with reasons not to embark on an outdoor adventure — or even a simple nature hike. The weather’s bad. There are no mountains nearby. The trails are closed. But there are a host of reasons those barriers shouldn't stand in our way. I've always wanted to hike the full John Muir Trail — so much so that I made a pac...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Munjal Shah Tags: featured health and fitness health tips healthy living hiking Source Type: blogs

Beefy Arguments for Libertarianism
This report has layers of flaws and is the most egregious abuse of evidence that I have ever seen,"said Walter Willett of Harvard. "Their recommendations are really irresponsible,"said Frank Hu of Harvard. A contrarian would immediately assume, therefore, that the study in question must be marvelous. Is it?Well, it represents part of a new wave in nutrition, in which a group of scientists who have no financial ties to the food industry set themselves up, like the justices of the Supreme Court, to adjudicate as a panel  on a field of research. And, again like the justices of the Supreme Court, they are n...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Terence Kealey Source Type: blogs

20 Small Ways to Get Out of Your Comfort Zone
“Get out of your comfort zone. You can only grow if you are willing to feel awkward and uncomfortable when you try something new.” Brian Tracy I’m a big fan of doing the unusual thing. Sometimes in big ways. Often in small and daily ways to mix things up. Why? Because this habit is a simple and relatively easy way to: Get out of your comfort zone. And if you change your perspective on yourself from someone who sticks to the old and comfortable all the time to someone who likes to mix things up then it will feel more natural and easier to break out of your comfort zone when comes to bigger things too. Bec...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - September 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Habits Happiness Personal Development Success Source Type: blogs

When it comes to cholesterol levels, white meat may be no better than red meat — and plant-based protein beats both
This study looked at plant-based protein sources, and plant-based diets can provide all the necessary protein for optimal health. Here’s a look at the amount of protein contained in a variety of plant-based foods. Protein content in plant-based foods Food Serving size Protein (grams) Calories Lentils 1/2 cup 9 115 Black beans 1/2 cup 8 114 Chickpeas 1/2 cup 7 135 Kidney beans 1/2 cup 8 113 Black eyed peas 1/2 cup 7 112 Pinto beans 1/2 cup 7 117 Soybeans 1/2 cup 14 150 Tofu 1/2 cup 10 183 Nuts 1/2 cup 5–7 160–200 Peanut butter 2 tablespoons 8 190 Flaxseeds 3 tablespoons 5 150 ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Impossible and Beyond: How healthy are these meatless burgers?
Plant-based burgers are not a novel concept. But new products designed to taste like meat are now being marketed to vegetarians and meat-eaters alike. Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat’s Beyond Burger are two such options. Eating these burgers is touted as a strategy to save the earth, casting meat as a prehistoric concept. Both brands also offer up their products as nutritious alternatives to animal protein. But how do they stack up? It turns out the answer may depend on whether your priorities lie with your personal health or the health of the planet. The good news: Meatless burgers are a good source of protein, vi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Gelsomin, MLA, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

The DASH diet: A great way to eat foods that are healthy AND delicious
The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is an eating plan based on eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, and choosing lean proteins, low-fat dairy, beans, nuts, and vegetable oils, while limiting sweets and foods high in saturated fats. A recent study published the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that men and women younger than 75 who most closely followed the DASH diet had a significantly lower risk of heart failure compared to study participants who did not follow the DASH diet. Currently, about 5.7 million adults in the United States have heart failure, and about half of those who d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Food as medicine Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

The Long Emergency: The petty and the existential
While it is true that fossil fuel interests have been the most important force behind climate change denial and effective policy responses, they aren't the only one. The meat industry, as far as I know, hasn't invested a lot in denialism but they are scared that people will stop eating their product. Obviously plant based foods are also produced by farmers but the overall demand for agricultural products is several times as high in a carnivorous dietary regime than it would be if people mostly ate a plant based diet.The result issome really ridiculous state laws. Yes, state legislatures are trying to ban labeling vegetaria...
Source: Stayin' Alive - July 23, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Digesting the latest research on eggs
Eggs are back in the news — again. A study from the March 2019 JAMA found that higher intakes of cholesterol and eggs were associated with a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death. The researchers reported that ingesting an additional 300 milligrams of cholesterol per day raised this risk, as did eating an average of three to four eggs per week. Should we finally resign ourselves to taking our toast without a sunny-side-up yolk? Not so fast. What did the study find? Human diets are complex and notoriously hard to study. This is one reason why health headlines are often maddeningly contradictory. For t...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Gelsomin, MLA, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Government Should Keep Its Hands Off Our Tofu Sausages!
You may or may not want to eat something called a “veggie burger,” but you probably have a good idea what is in it: Vegetables. And not meat. Similarly, you also probably have a good idea what is in a “hamburger”: Beef, not ham. And a “cheeseburger”: Not just a big cheese patty, but cheese melted on top of beef (yum!). Consumers are pre tty savvy about these things.Sometimes governments try to offer “clarity” through labeling regulations, but in doing so they often make things more confusing. Last yearwe wrote about U.S. government efforts to prevent dairy-free milk products ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 16, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Simon Lester, Inu Manak Source Type: blogs

A practical guide to the Mediterranean diet
The Mediterranean diet has received much attention as a healthy way to eat, and with good reason. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, certain cancers, depression, and in older adults, a decreased risk of frailty, along with better mental and physical function. In January, US News and World Report named it the “best diet overall” for the second year running. What is the Mediterranean diet? The traditional Mediterranean diet is based on foods available in countries that border the Mediterranean Sea. The foundation for this healthy diet includes an ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Eat more eggs
The headlines are once again filled with advice to reduce egg and cholesterol consumption based on a study that found an association of egg and cholesterol consumption with increased risk for cardiovascular events. Sounds scary and persuasive, doesn’t it? After all, nearly 30,000 people were tracked over 17 years and the authors authoritatively declare that this proves that eggs and cholesterol are risk factors for heart disease. There are several problems with this assessment. It is emblematic of the studies that confuse people, yield wildly conflicting conclusions, are used to craft absurd and ineffective dietary g...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 16, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates cholesterol eggs grain-free saturated fat undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Sunday Sermonette: Useless factoids
Genesis 46 is kind of a strange object. Why do we need this enumeration of male descendants, most of whose names we will never see again and who have no individually identifiable role in the plot? Remember that this entire story is fiction, made up nearly 2,000 years after it supposedly happened. I'll get to that. So Israel set out with all that was his, and when he reached Beersheba, he offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac.2 And God spoke to Israel in a vision at night and said, “Jacob! Jacob!”“Here I am,” he replied.Sometimes the man is named Israel and sometimes he's named ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - March 10, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Dietary Blunders: Part I
How did I come to the conclusions that I’ve detailed in my Wheat Belly and Undoctored books? Easy: I started by making huge mistakes in my own diet. Following a super strict low-fat vegetarian diet caused me to develop type 2 diabetes, hypertension, sky-high triglycerides, fatigue and incessant appetite. I reversed everything by no longer limiting fat, adding back meats and other animal products. I’ve since done the same for hundreds of thousands of other people with similar spectacular stories of success. The post Dietary Blunders: Part I appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 4, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates grain-free triglycerides undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Five big nutritional mistakes I ’ ve made over the years
No question: I have made some huge nutritional blunders over the past 25 years since I began to become seriously involved in nutritional issues. My mistakes, however, have provided powerful feedback on how to get diet right, how to get diet wrong. The impact of diet is profound. Among the huge mistakes I’ve made: 1) Reducing total and saturated fat, eating vegetarian—It made me hungry, never satisfied, and, along with mistake #2, made me a type 2 diabetic with fasting blood sugars of 160+ mg/dl, triglycerides as high as 390 mg/dl, a HDL of 27 mg/dl, oodles of small LDL particles, and high blood pressure. 2) Eat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 2, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates exercise grain-free grains undoctored vitamin D Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Frozen treats: Navigating the options
When it’s my turn to go to the grocery store, it takes me forever to make selections. I’m mesmerized by the endless options in every aisle. This week I got tripped up in the ice cream department. Halfway between dark chocolate truffle and coconut caramel swirl, I realized I was caught in a little decision swirl of my own. There was ice cream, frozen custard, frozen yogurt, sherbet, and gelato. Some treats were full fat, reduced fat, low fat, nonfat, low carbohydrate, or sugar-free. And there was a huge selection of dairy-free frozen desserts. What was in all these colorful packages, and which one would be best?...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Should I be eating more fiber?
You probably know the basics about fiber: it’s the part of plant foods that your body cannot digest, and there are two types — soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Both types of fiber are good for us. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel. It is the form of fiber that helps lower cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber is found in black beans, lima beans, Brussels sprouts, avocado, sweet potato, broccoli, turnips, and pears. Insoluble fiber passes through the digestive system relatively intact, adding bulk to stools. It is the form of fiber th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Planet-friendly, plant-based home cooking
With all the news about the health and environmental advantages of eating less meat, many people are trying to eat more plant-based meals. But where do you begin? Instead of trying to cook an entire vegetarian meal from scratch, start with one small step and build from there, says Dr. Rani Polak, founding director of the Culinary Healthcare Education Fundamentals (CHEF) coaching program at Harvard’s Institute of Lifestyle Medicine. “For example, buy some canned beans. You can then make a simple bean salad with a little olive oil and lemon juice. Or if you have a favorite recipe for beef stew, try swapping in be...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Cooking and recipes Food as medicine Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Post-hospital syndrome: Tips to keep yourself or a loved one healthy after hospitalization
If you or a loved one have ever been hospitalized, you know that the primary focus of the hospital team is on diagnosing and treating the condition that put you in the hospital in the first place. The medical team works to treat a patient’s condition until the patient has improved enough to continue treatment and recovery out of the hospital. But recent findings have brought attention to an important issue that doesn’t strike until after you’ve left the hospital — post-hospital syndrome. What is post-hospital syndrome? Post-hospital syndrome can be defined as a period of vulnerability lasting up to ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeremy Whyman, MD Tags: Caregiving Health Healthy Aging Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

I ’ m grain-free, eat nutrient-dense food – why do I need nutritional supplements?
When you remove wheat and grains from your diet, you remove phytates that block gastrointestinal absorption of magnesium, iron, zinc, calcium, and other positively-charged minerals. You also remove the trigger for autoimmune destruction of stomach parietal cells that produce stomach acid and “intrinsic factor” necessary for vitamin B12 absorption. Wheat/grain elimination therefore preserve the stomach’s capacity to produce hydrochloric acid necessary for digestion and intrinsic factor for effective B12 absorption. So if you banish wheat and grains and thereby increase absorption of nutrients and make a ha...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 21, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle bowel flora fiber iodine magnesium microbiota prebiotics resistant starches Thyroid vitamin D Source Type: blogs

Logical Fallacies
From time to time I point out common logical fallacies that unfortunately infest our public discourse. Today's lesson isargumentum ad hominem, in which the debater claims that some characteristic of the proponent of a view renders that person's argument invalid.This has three forms. Tu qoque is pointing out that the proponent has said or done something in the past which is contrary to his or her position. This may be embarrassing, but it does not in any way invalidate the argument the person is currently making. And of course, people can change their minds, although this is something politicians apparently are not allowed ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 10, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Reduce HIGH TRIGLYCERIDES naturally and safely . . . without scam products
High triglyceride levels are as common as muffin tops and man breasts. You will find a triglyceride level among the four values on any standard cholesterol panel. High triglycerides are either ignored by most doctors or reflexively “treated” with drugs, such as fibrates (Lopid, fenofibrate), prescription fish oil (Lovaza, Vascepa) and, of course, statins. But buried in this single triglyceride value is tremendous insight into diet, metabolic efficiencies, and cardiovascular risk, with control using natural, non-medication means easy to accomplish with absolute NO need for overpriced Big Pharma scam pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 28, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates grain-free triglycerides undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Nutritional Lipidology
The statin drug industry and their willing and eager servants, i.e., doctors, have managed to prop up a drug franchise that has reaped hundreds of billion of dollars over the years while providing little benefit but plenty of harm. Although I’ve discussed these issues many times here in the Wheat Belly Blog, the Wheat Belly books, and more recently in the Undoctored book and Blog,  it bears exploring further. I keep on hoping that clarity, logic, evidence, truth and repetition overcome our lack of billions of dollars in marketing that Big Pharma controls, a genuine David-vs-Goliath situation. I call all the vari...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates cardiovascular cholesterol heart lipoproteins statin undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

What to Look For in Luxury Treatment
Individualized Treatment When you are looking for a luxury treatment center, it is extremely important that you find individualized treatment for your needs. No two addictions are the same; everyone has different experiences, traumas and life stories that lead to addiction. Detoxing and withdrawal symptoms can differ in severity, circumstances are different from client to client and needs are constantly changing. That’s why it is important that you find a luxury treatment center that will take the time to develop a plan for your individual needs. Evidence-Based Treatment Upon entering luxury treatment, you will first...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 7, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Rehab Information Complementary Therapies Drug Rehab Information Sober Living and Aftercare luxury luxury drug rehabilitation luxury heroin rehab Source Type: blogs

Eat more plants, fewer animals
Science has shown us over and over again that the more meat we eat, the higher our risk of diabetes, heart disease, and strokes. Conversely, the more fruits and vegetables we eat, the lower our risk for these diseases, and the lower our body mass index. Why is eating meat bad? High-quality research shows that red meats (like beef, lamb, pork) and processed meats (bacon, sausage, deli meats) are metabolized to toxins that cause damage to our blood vessels and other organs. This toxic process has been linked to heart disease and diabetes. (Want to know more? Read about how these animal proteins harm the body here and here). ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Food as medicine Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Split Pea and Celeriac Soup – Perfect.
If you want to know my perfect Saturday in NYC, here it is… Wake up latish – 8 am. Shower and have a cup of coffee while you plan tonight’s dinner. Make a shopping list, set up a loaf of bread to rise, then hit the streets with Mr TBTAM on the bikes. Ride across town, through Central Park, chatting a bit on the phone with your little brother who often calls you on Saturday mornings  (love my wireless airpods), across the West Side to Riverside Park and the West Side Greenway. If it’s a cold day in November, dress warmly – scarf, gloves – and don’t let the wind b...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - November 12, 2018 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Recipes Soups Vegetarian Pea soup Split pea Source Type: blogs

How to Change Your Life in Just 2 Minutes a Day: 10 Quick Habits
“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” Lao Tzu “The distance is nothing; it is only the first step that is difficult.” Madame Marie du Deffand Making a positive change in your life does not have to be about making a huge leap. But I believe that belief is one of those things that hold people back from improving their life and world. A simpler way that more often results in actual action being taken and new habits being established – in my life at least – is to take smaller steps but many of them. So today I’d like to share 10 quick habits that can help you to chang...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Habits Happiness Personal Development Productivity Success Source Type: blogs

Make Hackathons Fair Again
By FRED TROTTER On Oct 19, I will begin to MC the health equity hackathon in Austin TX, which will focus on addressing healthcare disparity issues. Specifically, we will be using healthcare data to try and make an impact on those problems. Our planning team has spent months thinking about how to run a hackathon fairly, especially after the release of a report that harshly criticized how hackathons are typically run. A Wired article written earlier this year trumpets a study called “Hackathons As Co-optation Ritual: Socializing Workers and Institutionalizing Innovation in the ‘New’ Economy,” which cr...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Hack-a-thon Tech hackathon health equity Healthcare Source Type: blogs

Four enemas and gruel: The birth of breakfast cereal
In the latter half of the 19th and early 20th century, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg operated a sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan, a place where you would stay for a month or two and receive four enemas per day, three meals of thick gruel (a mixture of grains such as wheat, rye, barley, millet or corn), and other treatments to “cure” lumbago, rheumatism, or cancer. Kellogg also advocated a regimen of fresh air, exercise, hydrotherapy and a vegetarian diet that abstained from coffee, tea, alcohol, as well as sex. One day, while preparing a batch of gruel, Dr. Kellogg was called away, only to return hours later to f...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Uncategorized blood sugar grain-free grains low-carb wheat belly Source Type: blogs

What is a plant-based diet and why should you try it?
Plant-based or plant-forward eating patterns focus on foods primarily from plants. This includes not only fruits and vegetables, but also nuts, seeds, oils, whole grains, legumes, and beans. It doesn’t mean that you are vegetarian or vegan and never eat meat or dairy. Rather, you are proportionately choosing more of your foods from plant sources. Mediterranean and vegetarian diets What is the evidence that plant-based eating patterns are healthy? Much nutrition research has examined plant-based eating patterns such as the Mediterranean diet and a vegetarian diet. The Mediterranean diet has a foundation of plant-based...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Orthorexia: The extreme quest for a healthy diet
The pursuit for the healthiest diet continues. Just as I was finishing writing this blog post, a new study came out suggesting that both low-carb and high-carb diets may shorten lifespan. In the 1980s and ‘90s, we were following the low-fat trend. These days, the ketogenic diet and the very-low-carb diet are all the rage. And if you think there is controversy about the right amount of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins you should eat, the conversation can get downright ugly if we start talking about specific items like gluten. Research continues to look for insight into the best diet for humans. But the relentless foc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Campos, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Healthy Eating Mental Health Source Type: blogs

7 Small Habits That Will Steal Your Happiness
“Simply put, you believe that things or people make you unhappy, but this is not accurate. You make yourself unhappy.” Wayne Dyer “Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.” Marcus Aurelius It is usually pretty easy to become a happier person. It is also quite easy to rob yourself of your own happiness. To make yourself more miserable and add a big bowl of suffering to your day. It is a common thing, people do it every day all over the world. So this week I’d like to combine these two things. I want to share 7 happiness stealing habits that...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Happiness Personal Development Source Type: blogs

Low-carb fairy tales
Conclusion: Premarin INCREASED breast cancer, INCREASED endometrial cancer, INCREASED cardiovascular death, even accelerated dementia. And this has been the story over and over again: Conclusions drawn in observational studies have proven to be flat wrong about 4 times out of 5. This hasn’t stopped people like Frank Sacks and Walter Willett, through the observational Physicians’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study to, time and again, declare observational findings as fact. Unfortunately, even the USDA buys this observational fiction, incorporating the findings of observational studies in their dietary g...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Fat grain-free low-carb saturated wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Coconut oil: Good or bad?
Conclusion: Premarin INCREASED breast cancer, INCREASED endometrial cancer, INCREASED cardiovascular death, even accelerated dementia. And this has been the story over and over again: Conclusions drawn in observational studies have proven to be flat wrong about 4 times out of 5. This hasn’t stopped people like Frank Sacks, through his observational Physicians’ Health Study and Nurses’ Health Study to, time and again, declare observational findings as fact. Unfortunately, even the USDA buys this observational fiction, incorporating the findings of observational studies in their dietary guidelines. Conventi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates coconut Fat grain-free Inflammation low-carb saturated fat wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Diet and age at menopause: Is there a connection?
This study does have limitations. For one, it relied on women to accurately remember what they ate in the past, and didn’t prove that the dietary differences actually caused the shifts in menopausal age. In addition, it included only 900 women — the ones who began menopause — in its final analysis, and used a relatively short four-year follow-up period, says Dr. Ley. That said, the findings are still worth noting, she says. They add to the ongoing discussion about the role of diet in menopause. They also seem to back up data from the Nurses’ Health Study II, which suggested that dietary factors &mda...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Health Healthy Eating Menopause Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Lifestyle change as precision medicine
Are you frustrated that you dropped only a few pounds following a new diet, but your best friend lost almost 30? Why did the probiotics that helped your sister’s bloating sensation do nothing for you? Your coworker swears that going gluten-free made his joint pain disappear, but you just came away craving more bread and pasta. In a world where we expect personalized products and services delivered promptly to our screens and doors, medicine is not even close to bringing this level of experience. Why does precision medicine in the 21st century remain so elusive? We are using an old framework to resolve the most common...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Campos, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Tracing The Future of Forensic Medicine
Realistic genetic photo fits, portable diagnostic labs and microbiomes are all new elements in the tool-kit of medical professionals in forensic medicine to catch criminals and solve complex cases. Reality is not at all CSI, but not because of the lack of high-tech, but due to the distortions of television. Let’s see how the future of forensic medicine might look in actuality. CSI and its effect Ultraviolet cameras showing bruises healed a while ago. Luminol displaying traces of blood on leather jackets. UV lights like lightsabers scouring over empty rooms to find saliva, semen or any fluid to do a DNA exam in a high...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 26, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Biotechnology Future of Medicine Genomics AI artificial intelligence crime CSI DNA forensic forensic medicine forensic science genetics microbiome police Source Type: blogs

Dry Eye: An Interview With Corneal Specialist Dr. Peter Polack
I met ophthalmologist and corneal specialist Dr. Peter Polack while speaking in Ocala, Florida. He told me that, by having his patients with dry eye—which has increased dramatically over the last 20 years—remove all wheat and grains, he is seeing this condition reverse within weeks, along with all the other health benefits. Unlike other ophthalmologists, who virtually have nothing to do with diet and therefore prescribe the costly drugs Restasis and Xiidra (each cost $500-$550 per month), Dr. Polack rarely has to resort to use of these awful agents. Here Dr. Polack speaks about his phenomenal experience. More a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune dry eye gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation restasis undoctored wheat belly xiidra Source Type: blogs

An Education Proposal to Chew on this 4th of July
If government is going to establish public schools, which must be secular, the U.S. Constitution requires that it also provide school choice for religious Americans. Soargued Corey DeAngelis and I last week in aDetroit News op-ed, and it ’s something you might mull over this 4th of July as you watch over your grilling burgers or, hopefully, even more satisfying smoked brisket or bacon-wrapped hot dogs. (It ’s always a good time to raise your outdoor cooking game!) Government must not inculcate religious beliefs, but it also must not elevate non-belief over religion, hence the need for choice.If you want to seri...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 3, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can ’ t believe headlines
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can ’ t believe headlines
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

20 Small Ways to Break Out of Your Comfort Zone and Create a Positive Change Starting Today
“Move out of your comfort zone. You can only grow if you are willing to feel awkward and uncomfortable when you try something new.” Brian Tracy I’m a big fan of doing the unusual thing. Sometimes in big ways. Often in small and daily ways to mix things up. Why? Because this habit is a simple and relatively easy way to: Expand your comfort zone. And if you change your perspective on yourself from someone who sticks to the old and comfortable all the time to someone who likes to mix things up then it will feel more natural and easier to break out of your comfort zone when comes to bigger things too. Becaus...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Habits Happiness Personal Development Success Source Type: blogs

The Top Diets For 2018
It’s a new year and we all started out with new pledges and resolutions. We thought to ourselves that this year would be different, it would be better. How many of us pledged to be healthier and to lose some weight is 2018? I know I was one of them. As our wishes for healthier slimmer bodies evolves every year, so do the dieting options and trends. Like clockwork, there are a few new diets to consider for 2018. The lowest ranking diets this year, also known as, diets you should avoid are the Keto diet and the Dukan diet. The Keto diet requires you to load up on fats while simultaneously slashing carbs. This forces yo...
Source: Nursing Comments - April 20, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: M1gu3l Tags: Dieting Source Type: blogs

The Top Diets For 2018
It’s a new year and we all started out with new pledges and resolutions. We thought to ourselves that this year would be different, it would be better. How many of us pledged to be healthier and to lose some weight is 2018? I know I was one of them. As our wishes for healthier slimmer bodies evolve every year, so do the dieting options and trends. Like clockwork, there are a few new diets to consider for 2018. The lowest ranking diets this year, also known as, diets you should avoid are the Keto diet and the Dukan diet. The Keto diet requires you to load up on fats while simultaneously slashing carbs. This forces you...
Source: Nursing Comments - April 20, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: M1gu3l Tags: Dieting Source Type: blogs

Creatine: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Restoring Brain Energy
This study clearly demonstrates the possibility of using creatine supplementation to modify high-energy phosphate metabolism in the brain. This is especially important for people with certain brain disorders as alterations in brain phosphate metabolism have been reported in depression, schizophrenia, and in cases of cocaine and opiate abuse. The effects of creatine supplementation in another human study demonstrated that creatine can improve cognitive performance during oxygen deprivation. The participants in this study received creatine or placebo for seven days and were then exposed to a hypoxic gas mixture. In compariso...
Source: World of Psychology - April 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Publishers Research Brain Chemistry brain energy Brain Function Cognitive Functions creatine neurodegenerative conditions Psychiatric Disorders study Source Type: blogs

How much can what we eat help inflammatory bowel disease?
Speaking at the event, Dr Alan Desmond, Consultant Gastroenterologist at South Devon Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, UK, suggested that active Crohn’s Disease (CD) can be successfully reversed by adopting a Whole Food Plant Based Diet (WFPBD). He cited data from two trials which have shown diets like the WFPBD, which restricts animal protein, animal fat, omega-6 PUFAs, dairy, emulsifiers and food additives while providing dietary fibre can bring improvements in people with Crohn’s in just six weeks. Patients in the trials obtained 50% of caloric intake from an enteral formula (an artificial ‘complete nu...
Source: Nursing Comments - March 13, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: M1gu3l Tags: Nutrition Source Type: blogs

How to Live a Happy Life: 10 Things to Say Yes to Starting Today
“Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.” Marcus Aurelius “Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” Abraham Lincoln “If you want happiness for an hour — take a nap. If you want happiness for a day — go fishing. If you want happiness for a year — inherit a fortune. If you want happiness for a lifetime — help someone else.” Chinese Proverb Saying no is often the easier way out. When you say no you can safely stay within your comfort zone. You don’t have to fear failing or being r...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Happiness Personal Development Source Type: blogs