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Medication may provide greater virus suppression, reduction in lesions for patients with genital herpes
(The JAMA Network Journals) In a study appearing in the Dec. 20 issue of JAMA, Anna Wald, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Washington& Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, and colleagues compared the medications pritelivir and valacyclovir for reducing genital herpes simplex virus shedding and lesions in persons with recurrent genital herpes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 20, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Valtrex (valacyclovir)
Title: Valtrex (valacyclovir)Category: MedicationsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/23/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Skin General)
Source: MedicineNet Skin General - November 23, 2016 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

5 Things You Might Mistake For A Yeast Infection
Yeast infections don't have a monopoly on itching, burning, and weird discharge. For SELF, by Zahra Barnes. Lizzie Roberts / Getty Images In today's roundup of extremely obvious statements: The sky is blue, grass is green, and no one wants to get a yeast infection. But unfortunately, for some people with vaginas, they're a fact of life. These annoying infections happen due to an overgrowth of the naturally occurring fungus Candida albicans, and they're pretty common, affecting three out of every four women in their lifetimes, according to Mayo Clinic. Since yeast infections aren't exactly rare, when you experience th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don’t shrug off shingles
If you had chickenpox as a kid, there is a good chance you may develop shingles later in life. “In fact, one in three is predicted to get shingles during their lifetime,” says Dr. Anne Louise Oaklander, director of the Nerve Unit at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. The same varicella-zoster virus that causes chickenpox also causes shingles. After the telltale spots of chickenpox vanish, the virus lies dormant in your nerve cells near the spinal cord and brain. When your immunity weakens from normal aging or from illnesses or medications, the virus can re-emerge. It then travels along a nerve t...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Solan Tags: Healthy Aging Infectious diseases Vaccines Source Type: news

Everything You Think You Know About Herpes Is Wrong
By Kristine Thomason Hate to break it to you, but you probably have herpes. Turns out, nearly two-thirds of the global population is infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), according to a recent report released by the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO researchers estimated that 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 are infected with HSV-1, which is best known as a cause of cold sores. Another 417 million people worldwide aged 15-49 have HSV-2, the type most often thought of as a sexually transmitted disease. But get this-140 million adults have genital infections caused by HSV-1, meaning half a billion p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

News from NIH
March 26, 2015: HIV Can Spread Early, Evolve in Patients’ Brains   "The AIDS virus can genetically evolve and independently replicate in patients’ brains early in the illness process, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have discovered."   March 23, 2015: For Most Children With HIV and Low Immune Cell Count, Cells Rebound After Treatment   "Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after beginning treatment, according to a study by researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health." March 1...
Source: AIDSinfo At-a-Glance: Offering Information on HIV/AIDS Treatment, Prevention, and Research, A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) - March 27, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HIV levels fell in HSV-2–seronegative patients taking valacyclovir
HIV levels declined in patients who did not have herpes but took the antiherpes drug valacylovir in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial. The study showed that the drug “likely reduced HIV levels by interfering directly with HIV’s reproductive machinery and did not require the... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - March 23, 2015 Category: Dermatology Tags: IMN Journals IMN News IMN Infectious Diseases FPN Journals FPN News FPN Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Herpes Drug Might Help Control Spread of HIV, Too
Researchers found that Valtrex appeared to reduce viral levels Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS, Herpes Simplex, Medicines (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Herpes Drug Might Help Control Spread of HIV, Too
Researchers found that Valtrex appeared to reduce viral levels (Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - March 17, 2015 Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Infections, Pharmacy, Reproductive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Common herpes medication reduces HIV-1 levels, independent of herpes infection
Valacyclovir reduces HIV-1 levels — even when patients do not have herpes -- results from a resent study indicate. The result not only means that Valacyclovir can be used effectively with a broader range of HIV-1 patients, but also suggests promising new avenues for the development of HIV-fighting drugs. This insight is particularly significant given that some forms of HIV-1 have become resistant to existing medications. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Common herpes medication reduces HIV-1 levels, independent of herpes infection
(Case Western Reserve University) Case Western Reserve researchers are part of an international team that has discovered that a common herpes drug reduces HIV-1 levels -- even when patients do not have herpes. Published online in Clinical Infectious Diseases, the finding rebuts earlier scientific assumptions that Valacyclovir (brand name, Valtrex) required the presence of the other infection to benefit patients with HIV-1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 13, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: Spotty Palms
(MedPage Today) -- A 35-year-old woman presents for patchy alopecia which has been present for three to four weeks. In addition to the hair loss, she has been suffering from mild fatigue and some diffuse aches. On exam, she has an asymptomatic skin rash. ? The rash is diffuse over her torso, somewhat faint but visible over the extremities, and prominent on the hands ? Her only recent medications are valacyclovir, which she took for three weeks previously for an asymptomatic vaginal erosion. (Source: MedPage Today Dermatology)
Source: MedPage Today Dermatology - June 23, 2014 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

New Study: Side Effects of Valtrex (Valacyclovir) Target the Brain;...
The American Journal of Therapeutics on March 22 of this year notes that, “Serious neuropsychiatric side effects have been demonstrated with the use of valacyclovir (Valtrex)….” (1) The Center for the...(PRWeb August 25, 2013)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/8/prweb11052617.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 25, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UNM Cancer Center selected for national clinical trial
(University of New Mexico Cancer Center) The University of New Mexico Cancer Center is among the few select institutions nationwide participating in a Phase 3 clinical trial studying a novel treatment for men with newly diagnosed, localized prostate cancer. In the study, men will receive injections of an engineered virus directly into the prostate followed by oral doses of valacyclovir. The injection causes complex changes in tumor cell behavior that ultimately lead to priming the immune system against them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news