Podcast: Stealing Cinderella (A True Story)
 Would you risk everything for love? Even your life? In today’s podcast, Gabe interviews Mark Diehl, author of Stealing Cinderella: How I Became an International Fugitive for Love. Mark’s book is his true-life story of growing up with an emotionally unstable mother, his resulting rebellious streak and drug use, and the wild ride of his forbidden love affair with a South Korean woman. The story details the couple’s narrow escape from her rich, abusive family in a journey where they almost lost their lives. Tune in for a true-life fairy tale that’s stranger than fiction. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW G...
Source: World of Psychology - March 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Motivation and Inspiration Podcast Relationships The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Drills, needles, and pain, oh my! Coping with dental anxiety
For many people, going to the dentist is an unpleasant but manageable experience. For others, just the thought of going to the dentist causes severe anxiety, leading them to delay or avoid dental treatment. Unfortunately, this behavior can spiral into a vicious cycle of dental pain, health problems, worse anxiety, and more complex and costly dental procedures. Dental anxiety and phobia It’s very common for people to fear going to the dentist. When dental fear is severe and leads people to delay or cancel treatment, these individuals may meet criteria for dental phobia or odontophobia, which is included in the Diagnos...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tien Jiang, DMD, MEd Tags: Anxiety and Depression Dental Health Health care Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

The Brain Stage: The Power & Promise of The Cephalic Phase for Health
Listen to the Podcast or Read the Transcript [00:00:03] Hi I’m Dr. Alan Greene pediatrician and I’d like to talk with you tonight about The Brain Stage. [00:00:10] I remember vividly when I was a pediatric resident in training go to a Grand Rounds about a surprising topic. [00:00:18] The function of the brain and the function of the skin and one of the things that dermatologists talked about was a common procedure freezing warts. Freezing warts was then, and is still, one of the most common ways to get rid of warts. What she talked about was how wildly different the results were in different studies. People use...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - May 23, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Uncategorized Cephalic Phase Placebo The Brain Stage Source Type: blogs

How Do I Detox From Benzodiazepines?
Detox from Benzodiazepines Benzodiazepines are highly addictive medications. They are used to help treat anxiety, sleep issues, and even seizures. They work to calm the body and can be a great, helpful tool for many people when used as prescribed. There are many different types of Benzodiazepines, as they differ in strength and onset time. Some Benzodiazepines, such as Librium, is used to help treat symptoms associated with alcohol withdrawal. Detox from Benzodiazepines can be difficult, but it is possible. The names that people know most commonly know Benzodiazepines as include: Xanax Valium Ativan Klonopin They are onl...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - April 27, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Substance Abuse benzo benzodiazepines medical detox Source Type: blogs

A Xanax prescription that should have been rejected
In hindsight, I should have never accepted a Xanax prescription from my doctor. What followed was catastrophic — rapidly developing tolerance and physical dependence on the drug and a prolonged illness. Three-and-a-half years later, I am still slowly tapering off Valium (having transitioned to a longer-acting benzodiazepine to aid in tapering) and experiencing debilitating symptoms […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 28, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christy-huff" rel="tag" > Christy Huff, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Will US Drug Policymakers Blow It Again —This Time With Benzodiazepines?
In a recent  column, Maia Szalavitz reports on the rise in overdose deaths related to benzodiazepines (a class of tranquilizers including Xanax, Valium, and Ativan). According to a recent  study in JAMA, the number benzodiazepine prescriptions doubled in the US   from 2003 to 2015. And benzodiazepines are found in the bloodstream of almost a third of all opioid overdose victims—a nearly ten-fold increase since the beginning of this century. Szalavitz reminds us that the US is not the only developed country with an overdose problem from the nonmedical use of prescription drugs: ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 14, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Benzodiazepines and Addiction
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 31, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs

The Anoscope for Foreign Bodies in the Rectum
​Rectal exams are difficult for the patient and require true expertise. You cannot expect to complete a good rectal exam or remove a rectal foreign body without the correct information, good bedside relationship, and the right equipment.Ensuring your patient has confidence in your ability is vital. Take the time to get to know what equipment is available in your ED. It's important to know what to do before a patient comes to your department with a rectal complaint.Most departments have a box dedicated to the anoscope. It typically will have two handles for light sources and two sizes of obturators with casing. The items ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - December 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Acute Angle Closure: Mastering Tonometry
​Identifying and managing disease often requires the delicate and skillful use of temperamental emergency department machinery. The ability to apply these may appropriately help determine a difficult diagnosis.Glaucoma, we all know, can cause blindness, and acute narrow angle glaucoma refers to the angles within the eye that are not as wide and open as normal. People with acute angle glaucoma have abnormal anatomy within the eye where the angle changes as the eye is dilated. This can cause blockages of fluid drainage from the anterior to posterior changes resulting in increased intraocular pressure. It ca lead to acute a...
Source: The Procedural Pause - November 9, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Live the Wheat Belly lifestyle, get off prescription medications
Take a look at the list of medications people have been able to stop by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle. These represent medications prescribed by doctors to, in effect, “treat” the consequences of consuming wheat and grains. They prescribe drugs to treat inflammation, swelling, skin rashes, gastrointestinal irritation, high blood sugars, airway allergy, joint pain, high blood pressure, leg edema and other abnormal effects caused by wheat and grains. The list includes anti-inflammatory and pain medication, acid reflux drugs, injectable and oral drugs for diabetes, numerous anti-hypertensive agents, asthma i...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 27, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar bowel flora cholesterol Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

What the medical profession can learn from this patient
A excerpt from A Mind Unraveled: A Memoir. Copyright © 2018 by Kurt Eichenwald. Published by Ballantine Books, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. All rights reserved. I awoke in pain. Sometime during a seizure, I had fallen down the stairs outside of my bedroom and banged myself up. I suspected I broke a bone and decided to get an X-ray once I was more coherent. About an hour later, I hailed a cab and asked to go to the nearest hospital. Any doctor, I figured, could find a fracture. The cabby dropped me off at Capitol Hill Hospital. I remember little that followed, but my father later ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kurt-eichenwald" rel="tag" > Kurt Eichenwald < /a > Tags: Patient Neurology Source Type: blogs

We Seem To Have News Thick And Fast On Prescription Monitoring.
First we have:DORA the ignorer: Prescription-tracking system failing to monitor all high-risk addictive drugs Diazepam, quetiapine and fluoxetine contributed to ex-Navy submariner's death, says coronerAntony Scholefield2nd October 2018A coroner has stressed the need for real-time script-tracking software to cover addictive schedule 4 drugs such as diazepam and quetiapine, not just opioids.The Tasmanian coroner made the comments after investigating the 2014 death of 44-year-old ex-Navy submariner Michael Allan Steer, who died from a toxic combination of prescription medication.Toxicology analysis revealed the presence of di...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - October 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Can I Become Addicted to My Anxiety Medication?
What is Anxiety? Having anxiety is a difficult issue suffered by millions. It is much more than just butterflies in your stomach before going on stage or before an important event – it can be crippling and can cause severe impacts on one’s life, and you may need to be on anxiety medication to help with the symptoms. According to anxiety.org, there are many anxiety-related disorders, and they are divided into three main categories: Anxiety disorders Obsessive-compulsive and related disorders Trauma and stressor-related disorders Anxiety disorders are characterized by a general feature of excessive fear (i.e. e...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 8, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Anxiety Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment PTSD anxiety medication benzodiazepines Source Type: blogs

Is Addiction Hereditary?
Looking at Your Family History It can be widely speculated that addiction can be hereditary. If there are addicts in your family, it could be possible that their behaviors can be passed on to you, as well. When considering this, it is important to look at your family history, especially your parent’s. Numerous studies show the cause of addiction can be broken down to 50 percent genetic and 50 percent issues with coping skills. Further studies have shown that children of addicts are up to 8 times more likely to also develop an addiction. One study in particular took 231 individuals who had been clinically diagnosed wi...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - September 20, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Alcoholism Depression Depression Treatment Drinking Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eating Disorder Treatment Mental Health family family disease hereditary Source Type: blogs

Anxiety and Addiction
Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders Anxiety is a complex condition that affects millions of people all over the world. It is a broad term in itself and can look different on everybody. It is literally defined as: “a nervous disorder characterized by a state of excessive uneasiness and apprehension, typically with compulsive behavior or panic attacks.” Often times, anxiety and addiction can also go hand-in-hand. Much like anxiety, panic attacks can be completely different for everybody who experiences them. You may experience all symptoms, or only some. Some symptoms of anxiety and panic attacks may include: Rapid he...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - September 11, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Anxiety Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eating Disorder Treatment Source Type: blogs

Depression: Common medication side effect?
This study is especially thought-provoking, given that more and more people are taking medications with depression or suicidal thoughts as possible side effects. The CDC just released updated data showing a troubling recent rise in suicide rates, and that 54% of those who die from suicide do not have a known mental health disorder, so this is an important public health issue. That said, it is important to note: in this study, people who used these medications were more likely to be widowed and have chronic health problems, both of which are associated with a higher risk of depression. And many (but not all) of these medica...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Anxiety and Depression Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

Internet support forums for benzodiazepine withdrawal: the good, the bad, and the ugly
Since the advent of the internet and rise of social media, patients can connect and compare their experiences with prescribed drug withdrawal. A problem that was once considered rare is a worldwide epidemic that is finally getting noticed.  A recent New York Times article discussed the problems many have discontinuing antidepressants, and more than 8,800 readers responded about their difficulty stopping these drugs. Another recent article discussed the role of online communities in supporting patients withdrawing from prescribed drugs. This led me to reflect on my observations as both a doctor and patient navigating o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christy-huff" rel="tag" > Christy Huff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

‘ Going to Extremes ’ Hall of Fame
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In 2012, Greg Kelly suggested that LITFL collate the most extreme ‘medical extremes’. This is how things currently stand: ParameterLevelDiagnosisSubmitted by Ammonia514 umol/LTorsten Behrens Base excess (postive)40.6 mmol/LChronic Type 2 respiratory failureJakob Mathiszig-Lee Bilirubin1113 umol/lDrug-induced hepatitis (anabolic steroids)Jurij Hanžel Blood pressure345/245 mmHgDuring weightlifting (P. Palatini et al, 1989: https://www.ncb...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Investigation extremes hall of fame Investigations parameters Physiology Source Type: blogs

Not Quite Digital Health But An Anti-Scientific Outrage Nevertheless!
This appeared last week:Thank God, Australia is now licensed to ‘moisten intestines’ and ‘replenish the gates of vitality ’16/02/2018Edwin Kruys A while back I spoke with a politician who was very cross about the decision by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to make codeine products no longer available without prescription. When I asked why, the answer was, “Codeine is great for jet lag, especially wit h a Scotch.”Clearly there was some confusion here about the indication of (the painkiller) codeine, which can cause serious side effects, especially in combination with oth...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - February 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Dr. Google: The top 10 health searches in 2017
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Ever wonder what other people are wondering about? I know I do. So, here are the top 10 health searches in Google for 2017. And just so you don’t have to look each one up, I’ve provided a brief answer. You’re welcome. 1.  What causes hiccups? I was surprised this one made it to the top 10 list of health searches. Maybe this search is common because hiccups are as mysterious as they are universal. I’ve written about hiccups before, but let’s just say the cause in any individual person is rarely known or knowable. Then again, the reason hiccups stop is als...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Sleep Medications for Alzheimer's and Dementia Patients
I often have family caregivers request medications to help people living with Alzheimer's and related dementia to sleep.By Rita JablonskiAlzheimer's Reading RoomMedications have their place in Alzheimer's care, but only AFTER all of the suggestions listed below have been followed.It may seem exhausting to the caregiver to have to engage in all of these activities; but, the resultscould lessen exhaustion, frustration, and stress in a manner of days.Subscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading - This is a Free Service - Join NowRule Out Physical Problems FirstThere are many medical conditions that contribute to problems sleeping.Som...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - February 19, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers dementia connect alzheimers sleep alzheimers symptoms alzheimers treatment care of dementia patients dementia sleep not sleeping sleep medication Source Type: blogs

A Mental Health Counselor ’s Views on Speculations About President Trump’s Mental Health
Speculations about the mental health of U.S. presidents is not new and they have sometimes been justified. After he left office, it was learned that during the Watergate crisis Richard Nixon was depressed, drinking excessively and taking Valium, and talking to portraits of former presidents in the White House. President Reagan was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease after his second term, but it is assumed that he was afflicted with the progressive illness while he was still in office. All presidents have probably been called “crazy” in the colloquial sense by their political enemies. And some presidents h...
Source: World of Psychology - January 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeffrey T. Guterman, PhD Tags: Celebrities Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychology Stigma armchair diagnosis Cognitive Decline Conspiracy Theorist delusional behavior Dementia Denial Dona Source Type: blogs

The Other Opioid Epidemic
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD “I made myself a hypodermic injection of a triple dose of morphia and sank down on the couch in my consulting-room….I told her I was all right, all I wanted was twenty-four hours’ sleep, she was not to disturb me unless the house was on fire.” – Axel Munthe, MD, The Story of San Michele (1929) When people in this country mention the opioid epidemic, most of the time it is in the context of addiction with its ensuing criminality and social deprivation, and the focus is on opioids’ medical complications like withdrawal, overdose and death. But that is only one of the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Take it from this physician: Beware the dangers of benzodiazepines
It’s 3 a.m., and I wake with a jolt. My heart is pounding out of my chest. I stumble out of bed to take a beta blocker hoping it’s enough to quiet my heart so I can doze off again. I sleep fitfully the next three hours, experiencing weird dreams and terrifying nightmares. At 6 a.m., I take my Valium. Nauseated, I lie in bed for 30 minutes, so I keep down my pill. I must get my six-year-old daughter ready for school. Between my confusion and the stress of all the little steps it takes to get out the door in the morning, I am brought to tears. These simple tasks were no big deal before my illness. I left my job a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 6, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christy-huff" rel="tag" > Christy Huff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Pain in the Bite
​A 14-year-old boy with no past medical history was brought to the ED in some distress by his parents. One hour earlier while looking for his baseball glove in the garage he had felt a small pinprick just above his right ankle. The patient, however, became increasingly uncomfortable and began complaining of diffuse abdominal pain.​His initial vital signs were a temperature of 97°F, heart rate of 112 bpm, blood pressure of 151/91 mm Hg, and 98% pulse oximetry on room air. He appeared uncomfortable, was diaphoretic, and had a rigid abdomen. A small puncture wound with some mild erythema to the lateral right ankle was...
Source: The Tox Cave - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A hidden reason for electronic prescribing of controlled substances
As of July 1, pharmacies in Maine cannot honor paper or telephone prescriptions for controlled substances, from OxyContin down to Valium, Lyrica, and Tylenol with codeine. EPCS, or electronic prescribing of controlled substances, is a double security step in the prescription process built into EMRs, electronic medical records. It involves another password entry and the use of one-time passwords from a small number generator issued to each prescriber. It has been said that this will prevent fraudulent prescriptions via phone or on stolen prescription pads, as well as altering of legitimate prescriptions. Continue reading .....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/a-country-doctor" rel="tag" > A Country Doctor, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Medications Pain management Source Type: blogs

Lethal Poison Used in Syria
​The Syrian government recently used what is believed to be sarin on civilians, killing 80 people and injuring many more. (CNN. April 20, 2017; http://cnn.it/2oXX47G.) The use of a nerve agent was confirmed by the Turkish government after examining several bodies during autopsy.Sarin was first developed by the Germans as a pesticide in 1938, and is one of the G-series nerve agents that includes tabun, soman, and cyclosarin. Sarin was also used in a terrorist attack in the Tokyo subway in 1995, killing 12 people. (TIME. March 20, 2015; http://ti.me/2oY3F1Y.) Sarin is an organophosphorus compound similar to what is found i...
Source: The Tox Cave - June 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

10 Things Every Alzheimer's Caregiver Needs to Know and Discuss with Their Doctor
TheAmerican Geriatrics Society has published a list of ten things doctors and their patients should consider, know and understand.I think it is important forevery caregiver of a person living with Alzheimer's, or a related dementia, todiscuss these 10 issues with the doctor. Doing this in advance might be one of the most important caregiverdecisions you can make.It might also be a good idea toshare this article in support groups, and bookmark (save) it so you can find it when you need it.What is Alzheimer's Disease?By Carole Larkinhttp://www.alzheimersreadingroom.comI think this is an important list of things that nee...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - April 13, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: rtdemarco at gmail.com Tags: alzheimer care care of dementia patients dementia help for caregivers elderly dementia care geriatrics health help alzheimer's help with dementia help with dementia care life news memory care facility Source Type: blogs

Bioterrorism: 10 facts about sarin gas
As the civil war in Syria shows no signs of de-escalating, worrisome evidence points towards the deployment of chemical warfare with banned agents recently, resulting in almost a hundred deaths with more than a quarter of them children. Chlorine and Sarin gas are primarily being implicated. Here are ten facts to know about Sarin gas and how it works. 1. Historically, Sarin was used for bioterrorism by members of Aum Shinrikyo, a radical religious cult group in Japan, in 1994 and 1995 that collectively poisoned 6500 people on the subway. In 1998, Saddam Hussein used it against Iranians and Kurdish people. The Syrian governm...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 9, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/tanu-s-pandey" rel="tag" > Tanu S. Pandey, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Emergency Source Type: blogs

If you have low back pain try these steps first
Low back pain, the scourge of mankind: it is the second leading cause of disability here in the United States, and the fourth worldwide. It’s also one of the top five medical problems for which people see doctors. Almost every day that I see patients, I see someone with back pain. It’s one of the top reasons for lost wages due to missed work, as well as for healthcare dollars spent, hence, a very expensive problem. Looking at two kinds of back pain Let’s talk about the most common forms of back pain: acute (which lasts less than four weeks) and subacute (which lasts four to 12 weeks). Most of these cases ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Managing your health care Pain Management Source Type: blogs

‘ Going to Extremes ’ Redux
LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Five years ago, based on a suggestion by Greg Kelly, we sought out the most extreme parameters clinicians have encountered in looking after their patients. This is the league table we have assembled so far: ParameterLevelDiagnosisSubmitted by Fluid gain between hemodialysis sessions21 LRenal failureKT CRP950 mg/LNicky Highest glucose121 mmol/LHHS/ HONKGuru Troponin I180.0 ng/mlMIWanderer CD4 count (lowest)2 cells/uLAIDSAnne pH (lowest in DKA, and survived...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 22, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Emergency Medicine Intensive Care clinical extremes laboratory parameters pathophysiology Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 175
LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 175th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 4 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid,  Justin Morg...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Justin Morgenstern Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Obstetrics / Gynecology R&R in the FASTLANE EBM literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 172
Welcome to the 172nd edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid,  Justin Morgenstern and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R proj...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Airway Emergency Medicine Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE EBM Education recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Medications that Increase the Risks of Falling
Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older, and research suggests that those taking four or more medications are at an even greater risk than those who don ’t.ByAlzheimer's Reading RoomWhat ’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and DementiaHow to Test Your Memory for Alzheimer's and DementiaHow to Get Answers To Your Questions About Alzheimer's and Dementia“Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for adults 65 and older, and research suggests that those taking four or more medications are at an even greater risk than those who do...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - February 1, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care care of dementia patients dementia care health help alzheimer's help with dementia care medications falls Prescription Medications Risks risk of falling senior care Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence at RSNA: I'm Sorry, Dave. I'm Afraid I Won't Be Taking Over...
DISCUSSION all over RSNA was Artificial Intelligence, and in particular, AI as applied to Radiology. Well, let's be even more specific. There was a cloud (pun intended) hanging over McCormick, the specter of RSNA Yet To Come, which I quite presciently predicted in my 2011RSNA Christmas Carol:I sat down on a PET/CT gantry and bowed my head. The room spun, and when I looked up again, we were seated on a bench beside Lake Michigan. It was a blustery day, with winds one only sees in Chicago in the winter. Strangely, I felt no chill, as I watched leaves blowing through the PACSman's shadowy figure.I looked behind me and gasped....
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - December 11, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Benzodiazepines: What You Should Know Before Filling Your Prescription
The opioid crisis is still in full swing, but that doesn’t mean opioids are the only class of drugs hurting people. Benzodiazepines, like Xanax, Versed, Ativan, or Valium, are a class of drugs that are prescribed for anxiety and panic disorders. Prescriptions for and overdoses caused by benzodiazepines, which depress the central nervous system, have increased at alarming rates over the last twenty years. Here’s what you need to know about benzodiazepines before you fill your prescription. Like all prescription drugs, there are some people in specific circumstances who can benefit from properly used prescriptio...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - November 29, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: sheilas Tags: Richard Taite Source Type: blogs

Solutions for Difficult Problems:Eye Irrigation — Morgan Lens No More! Part 2
We promised you short, sweet, and simple solutions, and we plan to deliver. Many of the tools we want you to use may have merely been forgotten. The steps to complete these simple solutions will require just a few minutes of brushing up on the basics while watching our how-to videos and reading our step-by-step blog posts.One of the lengthiest procedures in the emergency department can be eye irrigation. Some patients may need 5-15 liters of normal saline flush, which can take hours. Alkaline products need ample flushing and constant reevaluation with pH checks to avoid ocular burns. Patients can get frustrated and often t...
Source: The Procedural Pause - October 3, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Dementia Care, Which Drugs Increase the Risk of Falling
Medications can increase the risk of falls and falling; and, are a major cause of injuries and death in older adults.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomDuring the entire 8 and a half years, 3,112 days, that I was taking care of my mother, I worried about her falling.Falls can result in hip injuries, head injuries, or something worse.If you loved one is falling, or complaining of "dizziness" check out the list of medications below; and then, consult with your personal care doctor.Problems with Balance, Walking, Falling an Early Sign of DementiaThe drugs older people take can make them more susceptible to fallin...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 7, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care Alzheimer's Dementia dementia care dementia falls dementia help for caregivers family caregiving help alzheimer's help with dementia care memory care searches related to falling Source Type: blogs

Give them the vees …
Today’s Maltese memory brought to you by the letter V Vacation, vacuum, vagina, vain, Valentino, Valium, vague, Valletta, vanity, Van Gogh, vanish, variation, V.A.T., Vatican, vasectomy, Vaseline, vegetarian, V-Day, velocity, venereal disease, vendetta, venial sin, venture, vent, ventilation, ventriloquist, Venus, veritas, vernacular, vermouth, versus, velvet, vermillion, vessel, Vesuvius, victim, V.I.P., vice versa, vicious circle, Vicky, victory, video, vino, violence, violin, virgin, virile, Virgin Mary, virtuoso, virtue, Viagra, vibration, vice, vicinity, vicious, viper, virus, visceral, vision, visitation, vitam...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - September 5, 2016 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Synthetic Dialectic
Banning New Drugs:What is the Path Forward?Eighteen months ago, in apost on novel synthetic drugs in the cannabinoid and cathinone families, I wrote that the new fake marijuana and fake Ecstasy were “very nearly the perfect overdose drugs.”  An MDMA-like stimulant called PMMA was implicated in a number of deaths in Florida, Chicago, and Ireland back then. PMMA, like many synthetic highs, is toxic at low doses, and takes a fair amount of time to take effect, thereby encouraging double dosing.A year and a half later, what has changed? Today ’s synthetic pharmaceuticals are not coming from secret underg...
Source: Addiction Inbox - September 2, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

Cancer Is Scary, but It’s the MRI Machine That Terrifies Me
I mentioned in last’s week blog that I don’t scare easily. Well, that might not be completely true. I have two real fears — and they are major! For one thing, I am totally afraid of falling off a cruise ship. I am convinced that someone falls off a ship on every cruise. I can’t imagine anything more terrifying than finding yourself in the middle of the ocean, with the big boat you were on moving off into the horizon without you. I know that sounds random and irrational, but there you have it. My Biggest Fear My other fear is perhaps more relatable, especially for other women who may be living w...
Source: Life with Breast Cancer - July 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Kathy-Ellen Kups, RN Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: blogs

Cancer Is Scary, but It ’s the MRI Machine That Terrifies Me
I mentioned in last’s week blog that I don’t scare easily. Well, that might not be completely true. I have two real fears — and they are major! For one thing, I am totally afraid of falling off a cruise ship. I am convinced that someone falls off a ship on every cruise. I can’t imagine anything more terrifying than finding yourself in the middle of the ocean, with the big boat you were on moving off into the horizon without you. I know that sounds random and irrational, but there you have it. My Biggest Fear My other fear is perhaps more relatable, especially for other women who may be living w...
Source: Life with Breast Cancer - July 8, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Kathy-Ellen Kups, RN Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: blogs

Beta-Blockers for Cocaine and other Stimulant Toxicity
Dogma: “a belief or set of beliefs that is accepted by the members of a group without being questioned or doubted; a point of view or tenet put forth as authoritative without adequate grounds.” Years ago I treated a university student who presented to the emergency department (ED) after drinking several cans of a popular caffeinated energy drink to “pull an all-nighter” during final exam week. He was tremulous, agitated, and pale, with sinus tachycardia ranging from 140 to 160 bpm and normal blood pressure (BP). The house officer (registrar) working with me that night proposed treating him with a be...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 4, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: John Richards Tags: Toxicology and Toxinology alpha stimulation amphetamines Beta Blockers cocaine dogma John Richards Stimulant Toxicity Stimulants Source Type: blogs

The Opioid Crisis: Nociception, Pain and Suffering
By MARTIN SAMUELS, MD In order to understand the concept of pain and its relationship to the current opioid crisis, it is prudent to review the neurology of pain an why it exists.  Several concepts are important to integrate. Nociception:  Nociception is the capacity to sense a potentially tissue damaging (noxious) stimulus.  To illustrate this one should place a forefinger in a glass of ice water and determine how long passes until an unpleasant sensation arises.  If one performs this experiment in a large group, one can recognize that, although the stimulus is the same (a glass of ice water), the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: THCB Source Type: blogs

What You See Is Not What You Get - Purdue Pharma Executives Pleaded Guilty, but the Oxycontin Billionaires Went Unnoticed
What you see if often not what you get.   Nine years ago, three top executives of Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty to criminal charges of "misbranding" Oxycontin.  The case appeared to be a landmark.  In previous years, top executives of large health care corporations rarely faced legal consequences when their companies misbehaved.  Yet in the Purdue Pharma/ Oxycontin case, things were not what they seemed.  Maybe that is why this case never did yield a new era of accountability for top corporate health care leaders.Background - the Oxycontin Guilty PleasIn 2007, we posted about the executive...
Source: Health Care Renewal - March 31, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: anechoic effect conflicts of interest deception health care corruption legal settlements marketing narcotics Oxycontin Purdue Pharma Source Type: blogs

Alkalotics Anonymous
​A 50-year-old man with a past medical history of alcoholism presented to the ED with altered mental status, nausea, and vomiting. He is arousable but a poor historian. His girlfriend said he drinks a half-gallon of rum daily, and had his last drink two days earlier. She reported that he started to feel nauseous, vomit, and go through alcohol withdrawal. She said he also has been taking a lot of calcium carbonate for an upset stomach, but she was unable to say exactly how much. ​ His blood pressure was 146/70 mm Hg, heart rate was 110 bpm, respiratory rate was 14 bpm, PO2 was 96% on room air, and blood glucos...
Source: The Tox Cave - February 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs