Coronavirus US: Over 18m at risk have poor or no insurance
Black Americans, who are 42 percent more likely to develop severe COVID-19 and 52 percent more likely to be underinsured, compared to their white counterpart, a new Harvard study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

18.2 million at increased risk of severe COVID-19 uninsured or underinsured: Harvard study
(Physicians for a National Health Program) Harvard researchers found that 18.2 million Americans who are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 due to age and underlying health conditions were also either uninsured or underinsured. Blacks, Native Americans, lower-income, and rural Americans, or those living in states that had not expanded Medicaid were doubly disadvantaged: they were both more likely to be at high risk of severe COVID-19 and to lack adequate coverage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Health care providers for the poor will get more federal coronavirus relief
The Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday that it is taking additional steps to provide federal coronavirus relief funding to health care providers and hospitals that care for the poor and uninsured. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Protesting Police Brutality and Racial Oppression Is Essential Work
As thousands of people march in the streets to protest police brutality, many worry about the risk of COVID-19 transmission. Protesters do not always social distance or wear masks. It is difficult to maintain six feet of separation when the streets fill quickly; it can be tough to call out for change behind a mask; and silent protests feel inadequate when the goal is to finally have one’s voice heard. Because of mass gatherings, COVID-19 cases are projected to rise. This is particularly frightening for people living in places, like Minneapolis, where daily hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 are on the rise or ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Brooke Cunningham Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Implications of Medicaid Expansion in the Remaining States: 2020 Update
Even absent the current economic crisis, if the 15 holdout states had expanded Medicaid eligibility as envisioned under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), 3.9 million fewer people would have been uninsured. (Source: RWJF News Digest - Public Health)
Source: RWJF News Digest - Public Health - June 8, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Simpson M Tags: Health Care Coverage and Access Source Type: news

The Implications of Medicaid Expansion in the Remaining States: 2020 Update
Even absent the current economic crisis, if the 15 holdout states had expanded Medicaid eligibility as envisioned under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), 3.9 million fewer people would have been uninsured. (Source: RWJF News Digest - Quality of Care)
Source: RWJF News Digest - Quality of Care - June 8, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Simpson M Tags: Health Care Coverage and Access Source Type: news

Concept Clearance » Digital Healthcare Interventions to Address the Secondary Health Effects of COVID-19 for Health Disparity and Vulnerable Populations
The intent of this trans-NIH initiative would be to invite research to determine the role and impact of digital health interventions (e.g., mobile health (mHealth), telemedicine and telehealth, health information technology, wearable devices) to address secondary health effects of the social, behavioral, and economic changes following the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly among populations who experience health disparities and other vulnerable populations (e.g., essential medical personnel, emergency responders, and frontline workers in essential businesses or services; people who are residents of chronic care facilities, co...
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - May 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

9.5 Percent Uninsured in U.S. From January Through June 2019
Overall, 13.7 percent of adults aged 18 to 64, 4.4 percent of children aged 0 to 17 were uninsured (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - May 28, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

9.5 Percent Uninsured in U.S. From January Through June 2019
WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2020 -- A total of 9.5 percent of persons were uninsured from January through June 2019, according to a report published online May 28 by the National Center for Health Statistics. Robin A. Cohen, Ph.D., and colleagues from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Did You Lose Your Health Insurance Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic? You May Have Other Options
Liz Clausen never thought her husband would lose his job. He was the first full-time hire at the Austin-based startup where he worked as a programmer, and the economy was booming just a few months ago. Then the COVID-19 outbreak hit, and he was unexpectedly laid off at the end of March. When he lost his job, he lost his health insurance, too — and so did Clausen, a freelance writer who was on his plan. Suddenly, the couple — who had just bought their first house last April — faced the possibility of weathering a global pandemic without health insurance. Clausen’s story is all too familiar for milli...
Source: TIME: Health - May 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer News Desk UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

COVID-19 Care Will Not End at Discharge —Government Help for the Uninsured Shouldn’t Either
Our patient had spent nearly a month on a ventilator, his lungs so diseased that every effort to allow him to breathe on his own had failed. And then, finally, he improved and the tube came out – he needed only oxygen from a mask. Now, he breathes without difficulty on his own. But that is far from the whole story. Once off the ventilator, our patient – a previously healthy man in his 40s – was for a time unable to speak aside from occasional unintelligible sounds. Nor could he move his arms or legs. Happily, he has since recovered some of his ability to speak and move, but we still do not know how long-l...
Source: TIME: Health - May 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Clifford Marks Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Without Universal Health Coverage We Are Sitting Ducks When the next Pandemic Strikes
The usually busy UN Avenue in Nairobi, Kenya where traffic is bumper to bumper on the best of days, is almost empty as people stay at home to avoid spreading the coronavirus. Credit: UN Kenya/Newton KanhemaBy Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya, May 14 2020 (IPS) We live in a different world to the one we inhabited six short months ago. With more than 4 million people infected and over 280,000 dead globally by mid May 2020, Covid-19 has ruthlessly exposed the vulnerability of a globalised world to pandemic disease. People are slowly coming to terms with the frightening and heartbreaking death toll, and we are still not out ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Siddharth Chatterjee Tags: Africa Economy & Trade Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Patients with Medicaid, No Insurance See Smaller Added Benefits from Experimental Therapies
Given these findings, researchers suggested that a better understanding of the quality of survivorship care that patients with suboptimal insurance receive could help determine how external factors may impact outcomes for these patients. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Hannah Slater Source Type: news

The full picture: Why we need more demographic data on COVID-19
By now, we ’re all familiar with the immense strain the COVID-19 pandemic has placed on our health care system, with many medical facilities across the country overburdened by high demand and limited supply as they attempt to deal with an influx of affected patients.But the crisis has also highlighted other health care challenges, including those related to health equity and the striking disparity in risk and outcomes among racial and ethnic groups. Current data show, for instance, that African Americans and Latinos are much more likely than others to be infected and die from the disease. Still, demographic information r...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 1, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Editor's notebook: Rising number of uninsured creates yet another business challenge
A great deal of attention has been focused on Covid-19 ’s impact on business when it comes to lost revenue, furloughed or laid off workers, and the cessation of what once would have been defined as normal work life. But there’s another looming challenge: the loss of workplace-provided health insurance. Just how big of a problem is it? Consider: An estimated 12 million to 35 million workers and their family members may lose their employer-provided health care coverage thanks to job losses connected… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 30, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Cindy Barth Source Type: news