Avoiding the Doctor? It’s Time to Man Up and Get Checked Out
Do you know someone who should have seen a doctor years ago? Maybe it’s your husband, or your father, or your brother, even your son? They complain about the shortness of breath, the nagging cough, or the stomach pain. But they never take action. For some men, so decisive at work or within the family circle, the lack of motivation to get an illness or symptom checked out is surprising. In fact, men are 24% less likely to have visited a doctor in the past year than women. Seeing a doctor is scary and it makes them feel weak and out of control. Roald Bradstock was one of those men. An Olympic athlete who trained 3 to 4...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - June 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Men's Health Source Type: blogs

Extremely Drug Resistant TB Diagnosed in Maryland Patient
Extremely drug resistant TB has been diagnosed in a man who traveled from India and then through 3 states before he presented for evaluation. He is now being treated at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Extremely drug resistant TB is defined as being resistant to four of the major drugs used to treat the infection. The post Extremely Drug Resistant TB Diagnosed in Maryland Patient appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - June 9, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease expressions extremely drug resistant National Institutes of Health phrases slang surgery TB tuberculosis words Source Type: blogs

Early HIV Treatment Is Essential, But So Is Testing And Linkage To Care
Last week’s announcement of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial results confirms what many experts have long believed — early treatment for HIV reduces illness and death. While START further establishes the vital role of early antiretroviral therapy (ART), many questions remain on how to actually bring the life-saving benefits of treatment to individual patients. In many regards, the very question over when to start treatment is unusual in the field of infectious disease. “No one says we shouldn’t treat TB [tuberculosis] until the size of your cavity is 5 centimeters ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 3, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Preeti Malani Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Organization and Delivery Public Health Carlos del Rio HIV Medicine Association HIV-AIDS Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment Source Type: blogs

Access, Excess, And Medical Transformation: Delivering Durable Health Care In Rural Nepal
Conclusion: On Impact And Scale We believe that Durable Healthcare can transform the health care industry away from the dominant fee-for-service paradigm and towards a model that incentivizes patient safety, patient-centeredness, and evidence-based medicine. Only then we will have a competitive marketplace of private sector providers who leverage public funds for the broader public good. (Source: Health Affairs Blog)
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 21, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Duncan Maru and Padam Chand Tags: Global Health Innovations in Care Delivery Organization and Delivery Population Health Public Health ACOs Durable Healthcare Organization EMR health technology Nepal health care Possible triple aim Source Type: blogs

Grief and Mourning at Death [EOL in Art 10]
Munch painted "Death in the Sickroom" in 1893.  Like many other paintings, it deals with the tuberculosis and death of his sister when he was 14.   Munch directs our focus not to the dying person but to the inner thoughts and grief of the fa... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 20, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

CME: Online Medical Education Could Revolutionize Training in Emerging Markets
A recent article published in Forbes argues that online medical education has the opportunity to revolutionize training for doctors and nurses in emerging markets. Internet-based learning tools “will increase the number of health workers globally and train them to provide high-quality care in places that desperately need it,” writes Will Greene, who runs TigerMine Ventures, an advisory firm that helps companies and organizations in Southeast Asia. Greene argues that medical education in emerging markets “typically suffers from two problems.” He writes: First, medical universities and residency ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 10, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Legal Briefing: Coerced Treatment and Involuntary Confinement for Contagious Disease
My latest “Legal Briefing” column is now up over at the Journal of Clinical Ethics.  "Legal Briefing: Coerced Treatment and Involuntary Confinement for Contagious Disease" covers recent legal developments involving coerced treatment and involuntary confinement for contagious disease. Recent high profile court cases involving measles, tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus, and especially Ebola, have thrust this topic back into the bioethics and public spotlights. This has reignited debates over how best to balance individual liberty and public health.  For example, the Presidential ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 20, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

When Death is Optional
Many people believe that medical control over aging will be stunningly expensive, and thus indefinite extension of healthy life will only be available to a wealthy elite. This is far from the case. If you look at the SENS approach to repair therapies, treatments when realized will be mass-produced infusions of cells, proteins, and drugs. Everyone will get the same treatments because everyone ages due to the same underlying cellular and molecular damage. You'll need one round of treatments every ten to twenty years, and they will be given by a bored clinical assistant. No great attention will be needed by highly trained and...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 5, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

What Do Measles, Tuberculosis, and Grains Have in Common?
What do measles, tuberculosis, and grains have in common? For that matter, what do anthrax, influenza, and brucellosis also share in common with grains? All the conditions listed are examples of zoonoses, i.e., diseases contracted by humans from animals. When humans first invited domesticated grazing creatures–cows, sheep, goats–into our huts, adobe homes, or caves, often sleeping in the same room, using them for milk or food, we acquired many of their diseases. These diseases were essentially unknown prior to the human domestication of grazing ruminants. The process of animal domestication changed the course o...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 9, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-Free Lifestyle barley corn gluten grains measles rye tuberculosis zoonoses Source Type: blogs

Collaborative tuberculosis strategy for England: 2015 to 2020
Public Health England -This strategy outlines how Public Health England and NHS England intend to organise and resource services to tackle tuberculosis (TB) from 2015 to 2020. It looks at using the assets that already exist in the NHS and the public health system to: support and strengthen local services in tackling TB (particularly in areas of high incidence); ensure clear lines of accountability and responsibility; and provide national support for local action. Strategy Consultation: summary report Infographic Public Health England - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - January 21, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities NHS finances and productivity Regulation, governance and accountability Source Type: blogs

Postdoc position in Computational Biology / Infectious Disease w/ Ashlee Earl at the Broad
My friend, the brilliant Ashlee Earl is recruiting a post doc ... posting this for her.POSTDOC – COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGIST (INFECTIOUS DISEASE)Requisition Number: 1571 http://www.broadinstitute.org/careers/job-openings/job-openings-0The goal of the Bacterial Genomics Group at Broad is to develop and implement genomic and metagenomic methods to answer pressing questions related to bacteria and their role in human health. Specifically, we seek to understand the evolution and spread of bacterial pathogens (and antibiotic resistance) including the interactions that these pathogens have with their host and host-associated m...
Source: The Tree of Life - January 9, 2015 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

New Antibiotic Teixobactin Holds Promise Against Resistant Organisms
Researchers at Northwestern University have found and grown a new type of antibiotic that kills many of the deadly antibiotic organisms that are developing today, such as MRSA, tuberculosis, and Clostridium difficile. The antibiotic, dubbed teixobactin, is still in clinical trials with animals. The post New Antibiotic Teixobactin Holds Promise Against Resistant Organisms appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - January 8, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease Pharmacology antibiotic MRSA resistance teixobactin tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 105
Question 1Rodney Dangerfield, the comedian, attends your emergency department. Complete his presenting complaint  “I drink too much. The last time I gave a urine sample it had…“?Reveal Answerexpand(document.getElementById('ddet114141590'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink114141590'))…an olive in itQuestion 2If one orders a Brompton’s cocktail, what might one get?Reveal Answerexpand(document.getElementById('ddet383681379'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink383681379'))Non-commercial hospital grade analgesic/sedativeMore commonly known as Brompton’s mixtureIt con...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 28, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Brompton cocktail chocolate survival FFFF Rapa Nui Rapamycin Rhabdophis tigrinus yamakagashi Source Type: blogs

Whole issues of Genome Biology/Genome Medicine on "Genomics of Infectious Disease"
Wow this has really got some nice papers: BioMed Central | Article collections | Genomics of infectious diseases special issue.  I note - this goes well as a follow up to the series I co-coordinated in PLOS a few years back: Genomics of Emerging Infectious Disease - PLOS CollectionsFrom their site:Infectious diseases are major contributors to global morbidity and mortality, and have a devastating impact on public health. The World Health Organization estimates that 1 in 3 deaths worldwide are due to an infectious disease, with a disproportionate number occurring in developing regions. While the completi...
Source: The Tree of Life - November 23, 2014 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Web First: For Global Health Programs Aiding Developing Countries, Analyzing A New Funding Model
This study, which was supported in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the UK Department for International Development, will also appear in the December issue of Health Affairs. (Source: Health Affairs Blog)
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 13, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Tracy Gnadinger Tags: AIDS All Categories Chronic Care Global Health Policy Public Health Source Type: blogs

TWiM 90: Think globally, act locally
I usually don’t post TWiM episodes here, but #90 has a lot of virology. In this episode, recorded in La Jolla, CA at the annual meeting of the Southern California Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, I first speak with Laurene Mascola, Chief of Acute Communicable Diseases at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Dr. Mascola talks about how Los Angeles county has prepared for an outbreak of Ebola virus. Next up is David Persing, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical and Technology Officer at Cepheid. His company has developed an amazing, modular PCR machine that is brining...
Source: virology blog - October 30, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology This Week in Microbiology bacteria Cepheid diagnosis ebola virus GeneXPert infectious disease MERS microbe PCR polymerase chain reaction public health SARS tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Quarantine: The politics are as real as the science
Implementation of medical quarantines in America brings into conflict various legitimate arguments regarding who, if anyone, should have the authority to restrict movements of citizens.  Quarantines are not new, but they exist now in a world with new dangers and new opportunities for abuse. In teaching medical students in recent years, it became apparent that many students found the concept of a home quarantine to be abhorrent.  Many were aghast at the concept that a patient could be restricted from daily activities, and found it an egregious violation of civil liberties and ethical conduct.  ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Hayley Dittus-Doria Tags: Health Care Politics decision making public health ethics Public Trust syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ebola: Local hospitals cannot be prepared
Recently at our community hospital, after we concluded a nearly two-hour standing room only Ebola preparedness meeting, I practiced donning and doffing the personal protective equipment (PPE) for Ebola cases. PPE is the protective wardrobe health workers wear when examining a patient with a contagious infectious disease. Each disease has a different level of transmission and requires an appropriate level of protection. I wear gloves 25 times a day to examine each patient I see. (Not all doctors do this; in my specialty of infectious diseases, though, it is prudent.) I dress in a gown a dozen times when entering a room of a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 26, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Hospital Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Surprised by Joyousness
This week, I was brought up short by a quote from a book by Malcolm Muggeridge entitled Something Beautiful for God. Muggeridge is writing about Mother Teresa and the religious congregation she founded, the Missionaries of Charity. According to Wikipedia, the Missionaries of Charity ”run hospices and homes for people with HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis; soup kitchens; dispensaries and mobile clinics; children’s and family counselling programmes; orphanages; and schools.” Muggeridge... // Read More » (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 25, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Joe Gibes Tags: Health Care bioethics Health Care Practice Joy in medicine Mother Teresa syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ebola Fever: “Don’t Panic”
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. In The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, author Douglas Adams provided his protagonist with two pieces of advise: don’t panic and always carry a towel. The first is good advice when it comes to Ebola panic. I was sitting down on the plane in San Diego airport after the American Society for Bioethics & Humanities meeting when I noticed a woman walking down the aisle with a face mask. Being a public health-oriented person, I figured she had tuberculosis and was under order to wear a mask to protect other people’s health.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 24, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Public Health ebola Source Type: blogs

AppStudio Humanitarian Challenge
Save the World by Developing or Donating! September 3, 2014 — The number of smart phones in third world is growing at the almost the same rate as Malaria, Ebola, Tuberculosis and AIDS. Nedzad Demirovic, an AppStudio user, had a great idea. Could we motivate our developer community to create some great apps to help people? He made a generous contribution to get this started. We here at NS BASIC Corporation have matched it, and we’re looking for more. We are organizing a Challenge for the best mobile application that will warn and educate users how to avoid the threats of diseases in the friendly game like ...
Source: The Palmdoc Chronicles - October 7, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: palmdoc Tags: Software News AppStudio Javascript NSBasic Source Type: blogs

500 Days And Counting: Critical Steps In The Countdown To Achieving MDG 6
Editor’s note: For more on global health, see the September issue of Health Affairs. We are now less than 500 days away from December 31, 2015, the target date for reaching the world’s Millennium Development Goals (MDG). This includes MDG 6, the goal of combatting HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases. Astonishing progress has been made to date (as mentioned previously in our Health Affairs Blog post): AIDS-related deaths have fallen 35 percent since their peak in 2005; global mortality from tuberculosis has fallen by 45 percent since 1990; and global malaria mortality rates dropped 42 percent globally bet...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 6, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Deb Derrick and Peter Yeo Tags: All Categories Global Health Public Health Source Type: blogs

A Little Reverse Engineering of the Role of Inflammation in Age-Related Immune Dysfunction
In this study, we demonstrate that the lungs of old mice have elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and a resident population of highly activated pulmonary macrophages that are refractory to further activation by IFN-γ. The impact of this inflammatory state on macrophage function was determined in vitro in response to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). Macrophages from the lungs of old mice secreted more proinflammatory cytokines in response to M.tb infection than similar cells from young mice and also demonstrated enhanced M.tb uptake and P-L fusion. Supplementation of mouse chow with the NSAI...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 2, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Five Absurd Overreactions to the Surge in Child Migrants
Alex Nowrasteh The surge of unaccompanied migrant children (UAC) that dominated the news cycle in June and July of this year has receded – so much so that many emergency shelters established to handle the inflow are shutting down.  At the height of the surge, many commentators and government officials expected 90,000 UAC to be apprehended by the end of the fiscal year (FY).  As the end of the FY approaches, the number of apprehended UAC stands at roughly 66,000 - far below the estimates. Now that the surge has receded, here are some of the most absurd overreactions to it.  Never be...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 11, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Partnership And Progress On The Path To Achieving Millennium Development Goal 6
TweetEditor’s note: For more on global health, stay tuned for the upcoming September issue of Health Affairs. In 2000, nearly 200 world leaders came together and agreed on a set of objectives intended to tackle some of the most pressing development challenges of our time, such as poverty, AIDS, and child mortality. With a target date of December 31, 2015, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provided a clear path for progress and a platform for immediate action. Last week, on August 18, we reached a milestone on that path – as of that date, 500 days remained to achieve these eight goals. So where do we ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 25, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Deb Derrick and Peter Yeo Tags: AIDS All Categories Global Health Policy Public Health Source Type: blogs

Nature Podcast: 21 August 2014
This week, how seals took tuberculosis to the Americas, a better map of Neanderthals in Europe, and microbial life lurking beneath the Antarctic ice. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - August 20, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Nature Publishing Group Source Type: blogs

A Brief Letter to the Long Retired
Life isn't fair, but you've probably figured that out by now. Your body is corroding, and there's nothing great about that. I guess I'm not telling you anything you don't know here. So try this on for size: in among all of the modern wonders of medicine, many of which you have become familiar with, some few scientists are working on ways to control the causes of aging and thus put a halt to all age-related disease. "All?" you might well ask. Well, aging is just another medical condition, so why not? We didn't put up with tuberculosis once we could do something about it. Coughing up your lungs just because every...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 18, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Help support acupuncture clinical skill building and vital healthcare in Nepal!
Founder’s note: Hey folks, this post is from a NCNM graduate who is going to be participating in the Acupuncture Relief Project in Nepal. She asked that I help her drum up funding for her endeavor – a very worthy cause. She’s going to be contributing some content about the project and her experience, starting with this post. Please give to her cause, if you can, and tell your friends!   Dear Chinese Medicine Central Readers, In early January 2015, I will leave my husband, two young children, a sweet German Shepherd and a cozy home. I will load a backpack aboard a flight in Portland, Oregon that will ...
Source: Deepest Health: Exploring Classical Chinese Medicine - August 13, 2014 Category: Alternative Medicine Practitioners Authors: Guest Author Tags: Community and Cultivation Foundational Science Source Type: blogs

Preventing Damage from Mitochondrial Mutations
SENS, the Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence, is an ongoing research and advocacy program that aims to bring aging under medical control. One day aging will be in exactly the same bucket as tuberculosis: it exists, it is a threat if you somehow lose access to modern medicine, but most people are never troubled by it. After watching the research community for more than a decade, I firmly believe SENS is the best path towards this goal, offering a shot at real working rejuvenation within our lifetimes if funded sufficiently. Aging is a matter of cellular and molecular damage, and SENS is in essence a repair prog...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 7, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

“Give me your tired, your poor…”
The rapid influx of unaccompanied immigrant children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border in the last few months has spurred a national conversation regarding the United States’ role in offering refuge to these children, the majority of whom are fleeing widespread gang violence and delinquency in their home countries of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. A key talking point for some in the debate has become the supposed threat to public health that these children pose. Pundits and politicians, from city councils to the U.S. Congress, have latched on to the alarmist claim that immigrant children are carrying diseases wi...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - August 1, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Access Advocacy Consumer Health Care Disparities Global Health Policy Politics Publc Health Source Type: blogs

Do we need more schooling, or just re-tooling?
In a conversation on the OT Connections Forum Dr. Pam Toto stated "These other professions - PT, Pharmacy, Nursing - whether you think they are comparable or not, have evolved to a point where they feel a need for that additional training for competent entry-level practice."I think these comments are interesting.  Dr. Toto is not the first to make these kinds of observations.  Others have stated that we need to prepare practitioners for the complexity and demands of the future.'  I have been wondering what that really means.First of all, I would like to acknowledge that in some instances our practi...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - July 31, 2014 Category: Occupational Therapists Tags: history OT Education OT practice philosophy Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, July 23, 2014
From MedPage Today: Salt Consumption Tied to Heart Risk in T2D. Higher salt intake was associated with a greater risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Three-Drug Cocktail Has Promise in TB. An experimental, three-drug tuberculosis (TB) treatment regimen demonstrated bactericidal activity in patients with drug-sensitive or multidrug-resistant disease. Antiviral Group: ‘Biomedical’ Tx Could Slow HIV. Nearly all people living with HIV could be rendered noninfectious by a suite of “biomedical interventions,” according to new recommendations for HIV prevention. ACS: What ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 23, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Life in Britain on the Eve of the First World War
Marian L. Tupy The Telegraph has an interesting series of short articles about life in Britain at the start of WWI. While all of the articles are worth reading, here are the best parts for those who like to compare standard of living then and now. Work and leisure Most Edwardians worked in dark, noisy factories, cut hay in fields, toiled down dirty and dangerous mines; had bones bent by rickets and lungs racked by tuberculosis. Life expectancy then was 49 years for a man and 53 years for a woman, compared with 79 and 82 years today. They lived in back to back tenements or jerry-built terraces, wore cloth caps or bonnets (...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 22, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Marian L. Tupy Source Type: blogs

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB meets SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY
DALLAS BUYERS CLUB  is a biopic about an unlikely hero, directed by Québécois Jean-Marc Valle and written by Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack. In case you get a call from your local AIDS-Walk coordinator, remember 50,000 cases of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) still occur in the USA annually. Transmission is largely preventable with education, testing and early intervention. Ethnic peoples of color are disproportionately affected in new cases. Thirty-five years ago, I never imagined AIDS would be the defining disease of my career and then some.  After my AIDS-Walk call...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: September Williams, MD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Fundraising Update: $66,000 Pledged to the Matching Fund
Starting on October 1st and continuing through to the end of the year we'll be running a grassroots fundraiser for SENS rejuvenation research, with all donations going to the SENS Research Foundation. Initiatives like this help to fund ongoing cutting edge work taking place at noted laboratories around the country, projects that build the foundations for future therapies to reverse the effects of aging and prevent all age-related disease. Aging is just damage to cells and tissue structures, we know what that damage is, and we can envisage the technologies needed to repair it in great detail. All that is lacking for rapid p...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 14, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Disgrace of the Year: Leading Lung Health Groups Call for Ban on Fake Cigarettes, But Want Real Ones to Remain on the Market
Yesterday, a group of international lung health organizations issued a position statement on electronic cigarettes, which called for a ban (or severe restrictions) on these products until more is known about their health effects. In contrast, these organizations did not express any problem with real tobacco cigarettes remaining on the market, even though they kill millions worldwide each year, and electronic cigarettes are not known to have killed a single person ever.According to a press release from the American College of Chest Physicians: "Experts from the world’s leading lung organizations have released a p...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - July 11, 2014 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 07-2-2014
Ve have vays of keeping you qviet. Halt den mund! Government-contracted security force who actually call themselves the “Brown Shirts” … threatens to arrest medical providers if they leak any information to media about all of the medical illnesses that are being seen at an illegal alien refugee camp in Lackland Air Force Base. By the way, this story is from FoxNews, so everyone should just ignore it until you or your family members sit next to one of them on a bus or in a movie theater. Combine these kids on playgrounds with anti-vax kids? What could go wrong? Nothing to worry about. Nothing at all. New ...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - July 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Fact vs. Fiction: Judge Upholds Barring Unvaccinated Children from Public Schools
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Vaccination is one of the great success stories of public health. People who receive vaccinations against disease are far less likely to contract that disease. In 1900, 30.4% of all deaths from infectious disease were to children under the age of 5 and the top three causes of death were pneumonia, tuberculosis and diarrhea-enteritis. By 2010, the only infectious disease in the top ten list was influenza and pneumonia at 9th place. In 2012, 91.4% of adolescents are immunized for measles, mumps & rubella, 92.8% for Hep B, and many others.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 27, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Pediatrics Philosophy & Ethics Politics Public Health vaccination Source Type: blogs

Hemoptysis Pearls
There was a nice article over at Consultant360.com by Drs. Laren Tan and Samuel Louie on hemoptysis pearls. Learned quite a few things. 200 mls of blood (about a cupful) is enough to fill the dead space in the lungs and is therefore generally considered the minimum amount of blood to make the diagnosis of “massive” hemoptysis. Hemoptysis with chest pain – think pneumonia/pleurisy, PE with pleurisy, pulmonary edema from an MI, or lung cancer Hemoptysis with dyspnea – think either exacerbation of patient’s underlying medical problem or a precursor to respiratory failure Hemoptysis with fever &nd...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - June 26, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Medical Topics Source Type: blogs

GlaxoSmithKline's Marketing Firm Promised "Clinical Trials Could be Your Solution" to Poor Graduate Students
We have frequently raised concerns about the increasing domination of clinical research, particularly clinical trials, by those with vested in interests in the research producing particular results.  In particular, drug, biotechnology and device companies often sponsor trials meant to evaluate their own products.  Often it appears that commercial trial sponsors manipulate various aspects of research design, implementation, analysis, and dissemination to increase the likelihood of a result favorable to their interests.  Furthermore, when even such manipulation fails to produce the desired result, particular s...
Source: Health Care Renewal - June 24, 2014 Category: Health Management Tags: clinical trials GlaxoSmithKline manipulating clinical research marketing research subjects Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 06-23-2014
The right to carry a concealed weapon only exists if your doctor says so. Many states are requiring that physicians certify whether patients are competent to carry a concealed weapon. Some states require mandatory reporting of those deemed not competent to carry a concealed weapon. Of course, the natural extension of such laws is that if the doctors make an inappropriate determination, then the doctors can be held liable if the certifiee does something inappropriate with the weapon. This New England Journal of Medicine article shows that many doctors aren’t comfortable making that determination. Then again, I’v...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - June 24, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Roll-Out Of New TB Drug Must Be Handled With Care
Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Johnson and Johnson, has announced that it will make its breakthrough new tuberculosis (TB) drug, Sirturo, available at a discount in 130 developing countries. As the first new antibiotic to be approved to treat TB in over 40 years, Sirturo will be an important new weapon in the aging arsenal of medicines used to treat this deadly disease. Sirturo’s approval was a breakthrough for global health and TB treatment. In 2012, the airborne disease killed about 1.3 million people, making it second only to HIV/AIDS in the ranks of infectious killers. While the number of people dying ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 13, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: José Castro Tags: All Categories Global Health Pharma Policy Public Health Source Type: blogs

Eat Pooideae
Pooideae is a subfamily within the biological family of grasses, Poaceae. Grasses within the Pooideae subfamily include wheat, rye, barley, corn, and rice, as well as the rye grass and Kentucky bluegrass in your back yard and wild grasses in fields near your home. Pooideae grasses can be promiscuous. Some of the grasses in this subfamily are able to cross-fertilize and mate with each other. This is how, for instance, einkorn wheat from 10,000 years ago evolved to create emmer wheat, the 28-chromosome of the Bible. Emmer is the product of the natural mating of 14-chromosome einkorn with a 14-chromosome wild grass, Aegilops ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Grasses Source Type: blogs

Eat Pooideae (A Problem For Hungry Humans)
Pooideae is a subfamily within the biological family of grasses, Poaceae. Grasses within the Pooideae subfamily include wheat, rye, barley, corn, and rice, as well as the rye grass and Kentucky bluegrass in your back yard and wild grasses in fields near your home. Pooideae grasses can be promiscuous. Some of the grasses in this subfamily are able to cross-fertilize and mate with each other. This is how, for instance, einkorn wheat from 10,000 years ago evolved to create emmer wheat, the 28-chromosome of the Bible. Emmer is the product of the natural mating of 14-chromosome einkorn with a 14-chromosome wild grass, Aegilops ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Grasses Source Type: blogs

Eat Pooideae (A Problem For Hungry Humans)
Pooideae is a subfamily within the biological family of grasses, Poaceae. Grasses within the Pooideae subfamily include wheat, rye, barley, corn, and rice, as well as the rye grass and Kentucky bluegrass in your back yard and wild grasses in fields near your home. Pooideae grasses can be promiscuous. Some of the grasses in this subfamily are able to cross-fertilize and mate with each other. This is how, for instance, einkorn wheat from 10,000 years ago evolved to create emmer wheat, the 28-chromosome of the Bible. Emmer is the product of the natural mating of 14-chromosome einkorn with a 14-chromosome wild grass, Aegilops ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Grasses Source Type: blogs

Emmanuelism provided the Core Values to the developing occupational therapy profession
As part of a multi-year research effort into the nature of Social Justice I have been participating in an lengthy conversation about this topic on the OT Connections forum, which is an official message board for the American Occupational Therapy Association.From the beginning of the discussion some have claimed that Social Justice is a Core Value in occupational therapy.  This has been a difficult claim to validate, because there does not seem to be a a standard definition of 'Core Value' just as there does not seem to be agreement on the definition of Social Justice itself."In 2003, members of the AOTA Represent...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - May 7, 2014 Category: Occupational Therapists Tags: history Source Type: blogs

What Is Tuberculosis?
Tuberculosis is not a disease of the past. It is important to educate yourself on the disease, what the symptoms are, and how it is treated.Contributor: Lisa P. KirkpatrickPublished: Mar 26, 2014 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - March 26, 2014 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Get Schooled on Tuberculosis (TB)
We will go over five interesting facts about tuberculosis, including some things the general population may not know about.Contributor: Ashley PhamPublished: Mar 26, 2014 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - March 26, 2014 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Tuberculosis Facts You Need to Know
Tuberculosis is the second leading infectious killer in the world. Today, TB is a global health concern with an increase in multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Learn the facts about TB and how it might affect you.Contributor: Sam MontanaPublished: Mar 26, 2014 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - March 26, 2014 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs