The Dangerous Expansion of Adult Vaccinations
Conclusion The vaccination comprises a misguided and unsafe national health care program which claims to prevent disease. Many significant health injuries are associated with vaccinating adults. Government resources are being spent researching and developing new and different vaccinations. Subjecting adults to more vaccinations is likely to cause more health injury and illness. References: http://www.vaccinationcouncil.org/2012/07/05/herd-immunity… http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/ http://www.vaccinationcouncil.org/2011/02/18/60-lab-studies… http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/adult.html...
Source: vactruth.com - September 10, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Recent Articles Top Stories adult vaccination adult vaccines new vaccines shingles vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs

The Case of Lena
History provides context for understanding.  We are so far removed from the daily life struggles of 100 years ago and our own experiences are so very different that it is difficult for us to develop a clear understanding of  why events unfolded the way that they did.Occupational therapy is a health related profession that was born from the crucible of American society and culture at the turn of the 20th century.  As such, events from those times greatly influenced the thinking of our primary founders.George Edward Barton lived in Clifton Springs in Ontario County on the street behind the Clifton Springs Sani...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - September 2, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Tags: Barton history Source Type: blogs

Why banning commercial surrogacy is not a good idea
The Government of India has decided to pass a law which bans commercial surrogacy. I think it's good that surrogacy is being regulated , because it is often misused and overused. A few unscrupulous clinics were doing too much surrogacy when it wasn't called for, simply in order to make more money, and this needed to be controlled.  When this abuse was highlighted by media reports, the politicians resorted by adopting their standard knee-jerk reflex response , and decided to ban commercial surrogacy completely.At first blush, this seems like a sensible solution , because it is intended to protect poor women who could o...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - August 24, 2016 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 15th 2016
In conclusion, our results demonstrate that circulating GDF11 levels are reduced in our mouse model of premature aging, which shares most of the symptoms that occur in normal aging. However, GDF11 protein administration is not sufficient to extend longevity in these progeroid mice. Although accelerated-aging mouse models can serve as powerful tools to test and develop anti-aging therapies common to both physiological and pathological aging, the existence of certain differences between the two processes implies that further investigation is still required to determine whether long-term GDF11 administration has a pro-surviva...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 14, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV/AIDS Hepatitis Awareness Day (NAIRHHA) toolkit
September 9th is designated as NAIRHHA Day. The purpose of NAIRHHA Day is to bring national and local attention to the HIV and viral Hepatitis needs of African immigrants living in the U.S. in a culturally and linguistically appropriate manner. The creation of a national awareness day will also support the eradication of other epidemics fueling or related to HIV disparities among African immigrants, including Tuberculosis, Substance Use and Mental Health. Learn more about NAIRHHA Day https://nnlm.gov/bhic/2biv FaceBook https://nnlm.gov/bhic/doy1 To request the toolkit http://ow.ly/d/4HyI (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - August 9, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Health Information Literacy HIV/AIDS Minority Health Concerns Public Health Source Type: blogs

CryoSuisse and the 1st International Cryonics Conference this November
At present there are only a few active cryonics providers, organizations that can cryopreserve an individual at death in order to maintain the structure of the mind indefinitely, waiting on a future in which the technology exists to allow restoration to active life. Cryonics offers the only shot at a longer life in the future for those who will age to death prior to the advent of working rejuvenation therapies. The odds are unknown, but certainly infinitely better than those associated with any of the other available options at the end of life. Most cryonics providers and their support organizations are in the US, and the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 9, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 28-year-old man exposed to pulmonary tuberculosis
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 28-year-old man is evaluated after being informed his roommate at a homeless shelter was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis. He reports no fever, cough, night sweats, or weight loss. Medical history is significant for injection drug use, most recently 2 weeks ago, although he reports no known infectious complications in the past. Medical history is otherwise unremarkable, and he takes no medications. On physical examination, vital signs are normal. BMI is 22. Track marks secondary to injection drug ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 16, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Out of Africa
I just got back from the trip of a lifetime: an African safari. I had the good fortune to visit South Africa (both Cape Town/Cape of Good Hope and Krueger National Park) as well as the Zimbabwe side of Victoria Falls. Wow. If you have done it, you know what I mean. If you haven’t, it’s so worth it. No tigers or bears, but lions galore. And elephants and rhinos and hippos (my favorite) and monkeys and I could go on and on. Even ostriches and penguins! It’s something to behold. Of course it’s hard to go the entire trip without making Lion King references or Book of Mormon jokes. Penguins from near Cap...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - June 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Cancer Publc Health Source Type: blogs

The Mischief and the Good In Precision Medicine
By MERCEDITAS VILLANUEVA, MD When The White House announced their Precision Medicine Initiative last year, they referred to precision medicine as “a new era of medicine,” signaling a shift in focus from a “one-size-fits-all-approach” to individualized care based on the specific characteristics that distinguish one patient from another. While there continues to be immense excitement about its game-changing impact in terms of early diagnoses and targeting specific treatment options, the advancements in technology, which underlie this approach, may not always yield the best medical results. In some ca...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Gene Expert Precision Medicine Initiative tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Red flags when selecting an IVF clinic
All IVF patients know that which clinic they select for doing their IVF treatment can have a big impact on the outcome of their cycle, and this is why they spend a lot of energy and time in shopping around for the right IVF doctor. Unfortunately, a lot of them are not really sophisticated enough to be able to differentiate a good doctor and a bad doctor, and most will end up going to whichever IVF clinic their family doctor sends them to. In the past, you could trust that your family doctor would send you to a good clinic, but as we all know, this is no longer a reliable method for selecting an IVF clinic , because the med...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - June 22, 2016 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Endometrial Tuberculosis: HSG
Female genital tuberculosis leads to  endometrial adhesions with deformity and obliteration of the endometrial cavity  and obstruction of the fallopian tubes with multiple areas of constriction. Advanced tuberculous endometritis may mimic Asherman syndromeFamous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradproviders.com Mail us at sales@teleradproviders.com (Source: Sumer's Radiology Site)
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - June 17, 2016 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Are Priority Review Vouchers The Answer To Incentivize Drug Development? Not So Fast.
In the May issue of Health Affairs, two papers examine the potential for voucher systems to incentivize drug development in areas of unmet medical need. Co-authors Kevin Outterson and Anthony McDonnell take a look at potential exclusivity voucher programs designed to encourage development of new antibiotics, while David Ridley and Stephane Régnier analyze the effects that expansion of existing priority review voucher (PRV) programs may have on the value of PRVs as a development incentive. Ridley and Régnier’s work is of particular importance as both houses of Congress pursue a spate of legislative propo...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 15, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Pranav Aurora, Morgan Romine and Gregory Daniel Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Global Health Health Professionals Quality FDA FDAAA priority review rare diseases Source Type: blogs

Making Hepatitis C A Rare Disease In The United States
New breakthrough medicines for Hepatitis C present an important choice about setting goals and taking systemic action to achieve public health advances in the United States. Despite appearing to offer cure rates greater than 90 percent, high-priced Hepatitis C drugs have driven treatment rationing since their approval over two years ago. Gaps in the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of Hepatitis C pose significant public health consequences. In May, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified Hepatitis C as the leading infectious killer in the United States in 2014—the first year in which new me...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 15, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Victor Roy, Dave Chokshi, Stephen Kissler and Prabhjot Singh Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Population Health Public Health Gilead hepatitis C Sovaldi Source Type: blogs

Silicon Valley Joins the Drug and Device Discovery Party
Sean Parker Kobe Bryant Every year the Milken Global Conference pulls together an amazing cadre of people for discussions of a myriad of topics, from politics to energy to healthcare to technology and entertainment. There are few places where one can simultaneously sit in the green room with Vicente Fox, Sean Parker and Kobe Bryant, but this was the place to be if you like to be the least famous person in a room. FYI, of the four of us, I am the only one without my own Wikipedia page. And I was in that room because I was fortunate enough to be asked to participate in a panel at the program cal...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - June 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Biotech Genetics Silicon Valley Source Type: blogs

The demise of authentic makerspaces: From Dad's workbench to Angie's List
Makerspaces or hackerspaces are terms used to describe environments where people build or create with materials, to learn how to share resources and work together to make things.  In their current iterations they are often found in libraries, schools, or even community centers and people are invited to come into the environment to work on individual or shared projects.  Here is a picture of a modern makerspace:Occupational therapists are becoming more interested in makerspaces, perhaps based on a seemingly genetic interest in the concept of a constructed milieu where people can come together to develop skills.&nb...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - May 27, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Tags: history parenting Too much information Source Type: blogs

The demise of authentic makerspaces: From Dad's workbench to Angie's List
Makerspaces or hackerspaces are terms used to describe environments where people build or create with materials, to learn how to share resources and work together to make things.   In their current iterations they are often found in libraries, schools, or even community centers and people are invited to come into the environment to work on individual or shared projects.   Here is a picture of a modern makerspace: Occupational therapists are becoming more interested in makerspaces, perhaps based on a seemingly genetic interest in the concept of a constructed milieu where people can come together to dev...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - May 27, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Tags: history parenting Too much information Source Type: blogs

The Untreated Epidemic Of Medical Student Depression
According to a new meta-analysis spanning four decades of research, 28 percent of medical students are depressed and 5.8 percent have considered suicide. Researchers from Singapore analyzed 77 studies, examining nearly 63,000 medical students across the globe. Distress in medical students is not just a first world problem. The percentage of students with depression or depressive symptoms ranged from 20 percent in Europe to 31.8 percent in the Middle East. Medical students in North America had the second highest prevalence at 30.3 percent. Still, there were no statistically significant differences in depression by regi...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 17, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Kunmi Sobowale Tags: Featured Health Professionals Population Health Behavioral Health counseling depression Graduate medical education medical school Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 142
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 142 Question 1 We’ve all heard of Occam’s Razor but what is Hickam’s Dictum or the Anti-razor? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet172338752'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink172338752')) A patient can have as many diseases as they damn well please. Occam’s razor can be paraphrased ‘when investigating a patient with multiple symptoms, a single un...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 22, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five abarognosis anti-razor Crabtree's bludgeon hickam's dictum life expectancy occam's razor Rene Laennec Stethoscope Source Type: blogs

Improving Diabetic Care in Malaysia
(image credit : The Star) By Dato’ Dr. Lee Yan San (Consultant Physician & Medical advisor to Penang Diabetic Society) Diabetes Mellitus is becoming more common and is a major cause of severe medical complications and early death. Fortunately, although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be controlled and those who are well controlled can enjoy good living and even normal life span. Here are some facts which may help to improve diabetic care in Malaysia. Regular follow up by your doctor is essential to avoid any chronic diabetic complications. I have noticed that many of those who do not have regular follow up by do...
Source: Malaysian Medical Resources - April 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: palmdoc Tags: - Guest - Health tips Diabetes Source Type: blogs

March blogs digest: essential tremor, brain awareness, kidneys, tuberculosis, and more
Shaking up the field March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month, a neurological movement disorder that causes unintentional shaking movements of the hands and head both when in static positions and during movements. In this guest blog Ariel Levy and Robert Chen, editorial board member for Journal of Clinical Movement Disorders, explained more about the disease. Quiz: Test your action potential Brain Awareness Week is a global campaign aiming to increase public awareness of the progress and benefits of brain research and it occurs in March. In light of this, we created a quiz to give you the chance to test how brain...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - April 7, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Sophie Marchant Tags: Biology Health Medicine blogs digest Source Type: blogs

“25 years ago, Vietnam had nearly 600 cases of...
"25 years ago, Vietnam had nearly 600 cases of #tuberculosis for every 100,000 residents. Today, it has less than 200. But, Vietnamese officials and at the @worldhealthorganization fear that hard-won progress may soon be reversed and a remarkable success story may come apart, with deadly consequences. The biggest threat: The money is close to running out. To reach Vietnam's ambitious goal of essentially eliminating tuberculosis as a public health problem, its tuberculosis-control program will cost at least $66 million a year. The country now spends just $26 million a year, $19 million of which comes from foreign donor...
Source: Kidney Notes - March 29, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Funding Zika But Forgetting Tuberculosis
On February 8, the day before the White House sent its Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 budget request to Congress, President Obama requested $1.8 billion in emergency funding to respond to the Zika virus at home and abroad. The World Health Organization (WHO) has proclaimed Zika a “public health emergency of international concern,” and governments have been in panic mode. But while there is certainly sufficient cause for alarm, let us not forget another grave threat to public health, which kills 4,400 people every single day and receives relatively little focus: Tuberculosis (TB). TB has now surpassed HIV/AIDS as the lea...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 24, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: True Claycombe Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Global Health Public Health 2017 budget infectious disease Obama TB tuberculosis USAID WHO Source Type: blogs

Aging Audaciously: Prevention Wisdom Kicked up a Notch Recap
During the Aging Audaciously event, “Prevention Wisdom Kicked up a Notch,” Disruptive Women cohosted with the Congressional Families Cancer Prevention Program at the Library of Congress last Wednesday, our first speaker Dr. Lisa Nelson talked about the culture change that is necessary to transition from pill-centered treatment to lifestyle-focused prevention. In the early 1900s, she said, infectious diseases, such as pneumonia, diarrhea, and tuberculosis, were the top three causes of death. To drive down the rates of these diseases, providers prescribed pills and vaccines and public health campaigns were commis...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Aging Source Type: blogs

“It’s #WorldTBDay. This old machine claimed sunlight...
"It's #WorldTBDay. This old machine claimed sunlight could cure the disease. WATCH and find out more at youtu.be/GhkgwaLMl-Y (or visit our YouTube channel). #medicalmuseum #histmed #medicalhistory #tuberculosis #tb #disease #pathology #history #medicine" By muttermuseum on Instagram. Posted on infosnack. (Source: Kidney Notes)
Source: Kidney Notes - March 24, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

“For #WorldTBDay, see this unusual form of childhood TB:...
"For #WorldTBDay, see this unusual form of childhood TB: gastrointestinal tuberculosis. This disease can mimic inflammatory bowel disease and is often difficult to diagnose because of its vague and non-specific presentations. To learn more about childhood TB, search "WFPIeducation" on Figure 1." By figure1 on Instagram Posted on infosnack. (Source: Kidney Notes)
Source: Kidney Notes - March 24, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

The MDG To SDG Transition: Implications For Health Care Systems
In 2016, the world will move from a global commitment to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to a focus on the much more ambitious and wide-ranging Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Whereas the health-related MDGs focused narrowly on particular diseases or conditions for select vulnerable groups, the SDGs are broader, calling (in SDG 3) for the global community to “ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.” As we take on this challenge, it is useful to reflect on what we have learned and what we will need to do differently to make substantial progress towards the SDGs. For the pas...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 16, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Arian Hatefi, Neelam Sekhri, Haile Debas, Dean Jamison, Jaime Sepúlveda, Alon Unger and Richard G.A. Feachem Tags: Equity and Disparities Global Health Hospitals Insurance and Coverage Organization and Delivery Population Health Public Health Quality HIV/AIDS Millennium Development Goals NCDs SDGs sustainable development goals Source Type: blogs

Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List
Editor’s note: “Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List” is a monthly roundup where we share some of the most compelling health care narratives driving the news and conversation in recent weeks. Cut Off From Ambulance Rides In December 2014, Medicare began a pilot program in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and South Carolina to require prior authorization for “repetitive, scheduled, nonemergency” ambulance rides — enforcing a long-standing Medicare policy under which beneficiaries needed to require a stretcher before Medicare would pay for the nonemergency rides. But the policy crack-down ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 29, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bylander Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Medicare Narrative Matters Quality big data On Our Reading List Source Type: blogs

The Perfect Storm: Vaccination and Modern Malnutrition
We have the perfect storm for creating an environment that will continue to injure and destroy the health of our most precious gifts, our children. We live in America, which is the most highly vaccinated country on the planet. Vaccinations alone are responsible for tremendous health damage. We are also a country that consumes a highly processed, sugar-laden, vitamin-deficient diet, which adds its own set of health problems. Good nutrition is the cornerstone of a strong immune system capable of maintaining health and naturally fighting disease. The combination of vaccinations and poor diets contribute to our growing health ...
Source: vactruth.com - February 15, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories Asthma autism autoimmune disorders Malnutrition official dietary recommendations vaccine schedule Weston Price Source Type: blogs

Do I Have Plague?
Another email from the patient who did not have tuberculosis (lightly edited): I did something stupid. Last night I woke up at 2:00 am to my cats hissing. I turn on the light and they have successfully surrounded a sock. So, I pick up the sock nervously expecting a spider or something but there is nothing. So, I put the sock down and an itty bitty mouse runs out of the sock and all the cats leap for it. I grab a shoe box and after about an hour, trap it. My plan was to put it outside. But I then realize this isn’t [Florida (from where the patient had recently moved)] and it is freezing outside. So I sequester&nb...
Source: Musings of a Dinosaur - January 14, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: notdeaddinosaur Tags: Medical Source Type: blogs

“Do I Have Tuberculosis?”
This is why I love my patients. Actual email exchange with an actual patient: SUBJECT: Do I have Tuberculosis? I had a cold like a week ago and I am better now but I still have a cough that wakes me during the night and produces gross phlegm in the morning. But it is mostly just snot by late morning. It sounds like Keats’ description of his tubercular cough except he thought it was blood instead of phlegm because in the 19th century he probably did not know the difference. Do I need to come in to see you? My response: >RE: Do I have tuberculosis? No. >>Do I need to come in to see you? Only if the cough ...
Source: Musings of a Dinosaur - December 30, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: notdeaddinosaur Tags: Medical Source Type: blogs

Eyes On The Final Prize: Integrating Services To Transform Global Health
As 2015 draws to a close, the global health community is examining the strides that have been made and how we can transform this progress into further gains across the public health spectrum. The United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2030 include SDG 3, a holistic goal for public health that aims to ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages. It is with the backdrop of this collaborative, interconnected development landscape that two important meetings take place in Japan this week. On December 16, a symposium on universal health care will bring together global leaders for a ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 17, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Eric Goosby Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Organization and Delivery Public Health HIV/AIDS Japan malaria sustainable development goals TB United Nations universal health care Source Type: blogs

Treatment of Tuberculosis via Now@NEJM
Treatment of Tuberculosis via Now@NEJM Posted on infosnack. (Source: Kidney Notes)
Source: Kidney Notes - November 27, 2015 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Addressing Tobacco And Secondhand Smoke Exposure In Maternal And Child Survival Programs
Ending preventable child and maternal deaths (EPCMD) by 2035 is one of US Agency for International Development’s (USAID) three global health priorities, along with creating an AIDS-Free Generation and protecting communities from infectious diseases. In June 2014 USAID launched the report Acting on the Call: Ending Preventable Maternal and Child Deaths, which provides an evidence-based approach to meeting this goal across USAID’s 24 EPCMD focus countries. One of the key elements of the EPCMD approach is alignment across interventions to meet the needs of affected populations; for this reason, Acting on the Call ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 24, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Karen Wilson, Jonathan Klein, Sally Cowal, Aaron Emmel and Emily Kaiser Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Population Health Public Health CDC Children cigarettes Environmental Health second hand smoke tobacco USAID Women's Health Source Type: blogs

A View of the Important Divide in Longevity Science from the Other Side of the Fence
Here I'll point out a view of the great divide in aging research from the other side. I have long argued that the most important divide in the field of aging research is between (a) the minority position of those who see aging as an evolved program, so that, for example, epigenetic changes occur that cause altered cellular behavior that in turn leads to an accumulation of damage, dysfunction, and death, and (b) the majority position of those who see aging as a matter of accumulated damage occurring as a side-effect of the normal operation of metabolism, and that damage results in epigenetic changes, dysfunction, and death....
Source: Fight Aging! - November 23, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The End of the NHS?
By SAURABH JHA, MD Britain’s health secretary wants to uncharm his way to a revolution. To galvanize support for a seven-day National Health Service (NHS), which the NHS was before Jeremy Hunt’s radical plans, and still is, he asserted that thousands die because there is a shortage of senior doctors during weekends. This is an expedient interpretation of a study which showed that mortality was higher in patients admitted on weekends. Hunt ignored the fact that patients admitted on Friday night are actually sicker than those admitted on Wednesday morning. When logos failed, and after br...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

The Public Health Dimension Of Germany’s Refugee Crisis
Germany is expecting up to 1.5 million asylum-seekers in 2015 who need shelter, food, and access to basic services. The continued influx of migrants is a major challenge for Germany’s health care system, which is tasked with providing essential medical services for the new arrivals — and may have to deal with novel and unexpected challenges such as mushroom poisoning among foraging asylum-seekers and refugees. How does a system geared toward providing comprehensive coverage to a population of 80 million deal with a large number of new migrants? And how can policies be crafted to respond to this challenge? Acces...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 22, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Dirk Göpffarth and Sebastian Bauhoff Tags: Costs and Spending Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Long-term Services and Supports Organization and Delivery Population Health Public Health European refugees Germany healthy migrant effect immigration crisis immuniza Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 120
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 120 Question 1 What rheumatological condition does Rembrandt’s Scholar have? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1210722826'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1210722826')) Scleroderma He has a pinched nose, tight mouth, pale face with a malar flush, his hands are puffy and the joints on his right thumbs are swollen. Could this be Scleroderma? [Reference] Question 2 When Ra...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 9, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five collapse dentist FFFF hands Kluver-bucy syndrome melanoma pleural collapse rachmaninoff rachmaninov Rembrandt scleroderma TB teeth temporal lobe Source Type: blogs

Putting The Brakes On Global Road Crash Deaths: One Foundation’s Efforts
As the United Nations (UN) meets this week to formally adopt the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), it will set the stage for dealing with a worldwide scourge—road crashes and the growing rates of traffic deaths and injuries. Road crashes kill more than 1.2 million people a year worldwide and injure more than 50 million, with deaths disproportionately taking place in low- to middle-income countries. It’s about time; this public health crisis goes largely unrecognized. If no action is taken, it will become the seventh leading cause of death globally by 2030. The UN’s plan for dealing with this epide...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 1, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Kelly Henning Tags: Global Health GrantWatch Public Health Consumers Health Philanthropy Nonmedical Determinants Prevention United Nations Source Type: blogs

The 21st Century Cures Act: More Homework To Do
In July, the US House of Representatives approved the 21st Century Cures Act, which heads to the Senate for a vote this fall. While no one can complain about the Act’s purported goal of “bring[ing] our health care innovation infrastructure into the 21st Century,” or increasing funding for the National Institutes of Health, the optimism surrounding the legislation obscures measures buried within that many agree will make newly approved drugs and medical devices less safe and effective, increase the cost of medical products, and discourage innovation in biomedical research. Long-term value to the public&rsq...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 24, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Susan Molchan, James Rickert and John Powers Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Health Professionals Hospitals Public Health Quality 21st Century Cures Act Big Pharma Drug approval Fred Upton Research funding Thurgood Marshall Source Type: blogs

5 Year Old New Jersey Girl Died from the MMR Vaccine, Holly’s Law Created
Conclusion We leave you with words from Robin: “My family and I hope that Holly’s story will make a difference and help you realize that you must be aware of the risks of vaccinations, just as you make yourself aware of the risks of any medical procedure. We hope to make change, and one very important improvement must be that the pediatricians acknowledge that there are vaccine reactions, that moderate to serious and even fatal vaccine reactions do exist and occur at least 100 times more than is reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).  We are still very disappointed and disgusted wi...
Source: vactruth.com - September 24, 2015 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Augustina Ursino Tags: Augustina Ursino Human Top Stories adverse reactions Holly Marie Stavola Holly's Law MMR vaccine National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP) Robin Stavola truth about vaccines Vaccine Death VAERS Source Type: blogs

You are not a Paleolithic human
Put down that bone fragment you were digging with and let’s grapple with a basic fact: You are a post-Neolithic human, born 10,000 years after the close of the pre-agricultural paleolithic era that dates back 2.5 million years. The Wheat Belly lifestyle and the population notion of a “paleolithic” diet overlap substantially . . . but there are differences. This is a common question that arises. So here we go and discuss our points of difference. First of all, what I am not doing here is bashing the ideas promoted by most followers of the paleo concepts. The ideas they follow are a damn sight better than c...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 18, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar bowel flora gluten grains insulin legumes paleo Source Type: blogs

Implementing Health Reform: Essential Community Providers; The Contraceptive Coverage Accommodation
The week of August 27, 2015 was quiet in terms of Affordable Care Act implementation activities, but there were at the end of the week on August 21 a couple of noteworthy developments. First, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services published in the Federal Register notice of a new collection of data regarding essential community providers (ECPs) to support the certification of qualified health plans (QHPs) for plan year 2017.  Later in the day, CMS published the data collection forms and supporting statements at its Paperwork Reduction Act website. The ACA requires QHP insurers, including Stand-alone ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 23, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Equity and Disparities Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Source Type: blogs

Amgen Pays $71 Million to States For Off-Label Allegations In Violation of Consumer Protection Laws
  Earlier this week, Amgen Inc. agreed to pay $71 million to 48 states to settle allegations that it violated state consumer protection laws by promoting its anemia drug Aranesp and plaque psoriasis drug Enbrel off-label. Amgen pleaded guilty in 2012 to a federal criminal charge related to similar off-label allegations related to Aranesp, paying $762 million, then the “single largest criminal and civil False Claims Act settlement involving a biotechnology company in U.S. history,” stated DOJ.  Aranesp is used to treat certain types of anemia by stimulating bone marrow to produce red blood cells.&nbs...
Source: Policy and Medicine - August 20, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Heading Off The Looming Diabetes-Tuberculosis Epidemic
Tuberculosis (TB) has recently made headlines in the U.S. And news of these cases remind us once again that TB is far from conquered. This disease infects about 8.6 million people every year and kills 1.5 million, more than any other infectious disease except human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Increasingly, TB’s spread is fueled by rising rates of diabetes—as with HIV, diabetes weakens the immune system, making a person more vulnerable to TB infection and illness—particularly in emerging economies like India and China, which are the source for much o...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 19, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Anthony Harries Tags: Costs and Spending Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Organization and Delivery Population Health Public Health Diabetes epidemics HIV/AIDS TB World Diabetes Foundation World Health Organization Source Type: blogs

Comforting the Dying [EOL in Art 97]
In "La Miseria"  Cristóbal Rojas depicts a man sitting vigil next to a female companion suffering from tuberculosis. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 16, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Near Death from Voodoo Hexing
By CLIFTON K MEADOR, MD   In the spring of 1938, Dr. Drayton Doherty admitted a sixty-year-old African –American man to the hospital. The small hospital was located at the edge of town in an old house that had been converted into a fifteen-bed hospital. Six of the beds were located upstairs at the rear of the house in what previously served as a sleeping porch. The patient was admitted to that porch. Dr. Doherty went on to tell me that the patient, Vance Vanders, had been ill for many weeks and had lost over fifty pounds. He looked extremely wasted and near death. His eyes were sunken and resigned to death. The ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Source Type: blogs

Autoimmunity: Drug Abuse
The Wheat Belly lifestyle that begins with elimination of the worst and most dominant of all grains in the diet, semidwarf wheat products, followed by elimination of its closely-related brethren in other grains, is a powerful start in reversing the 200-some diseases of autoimmunity. We now know that the gliadin protein of wheat and related proteins in other grains initiate the increased intestinal permeability that begins the process, as highly inflammatory compounds, such as lipopolysaccharide from bacterial cell walls, are permitted entry into the body. We also know that gliadin itself gains entry into the bloodstream a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 14, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmunity gluten grains Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Latent tuberculosis (TB) testing and treatment for migrants: a practical guide for commissioners and practitioners
Public Health England (PHE) - This guidance providers advice for commissioners and practitioners implementing local latent TB infection testing and treatment for migrants. It offers practical advice on how primary care based LTBI testing and treatment could be implemented locally. Guidance Associated documentation (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 7, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Commissioning Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Avoiding the Doctor? It’s Time to Man Up and Get a Checked Out
Do you know someone who should have seen a doctor years ago? Maybe it’s your husband, or your father, or your brother, even your son? They complain about the shortness of breath, the nagging cough, or the stomach pain. But they never take action. For some men, so decisive at work or within the family circle, the lack of motivation to get an illness or symptom checked out is surprising. In fact, men are 24% less likely to have visited a doctor in the past year than women. Seeing a doctor is scary and it makes them feel weak and out of control. Roald Bradstock was one of those men. An Olympic athlete who trained 3 to 4...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - June 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Men's Health Source Type: blogs