Sacral Tuberculosis
Here is a case of 35 year Indian origin male with backache with MRI revealed marrow edema in the sacral vertebral bodies along with presacral abscess noted on sagittal fat suppressed images. Interestingly before the MRI Xray didnot show much changes. In patients with osteomyelitis, MRI will pick up the changes earlier than plain xray.MRI SHOWING SARCAL EDEMA& PRESACRAL ABSCESS                              XRAY LS SPINE LATERAL VIEW Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdo...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - August 3, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

The Present And Future Of Digital Pills
Flicking your wrist as your smartwatch nudges you, you find a notification alerting that it’s time to take your digital pill. You grab one from your smart medicine pack, alert your GP, and ingest it with a glass of water. Thereafter, the pill broadcasts a real-time video stream as it goes down your oesophagus and into your stomach. Your GP is simultaneously monitoring the visuals, assessing the progression of your ulcer.  Afterwards, you have a video call with your GP who reassures you of the ulcer’s healing. She also notes that the digital pill contains your personalised medicine 3D-printed onto it and...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 21, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: 3D Printing Health Sensors & Trackers Personalized Medicine schizophrenia digital pill otsuka abilify pillcam patch etectRx infarmate hipaa Source Type: blogs

A Conversation with John Ioannidis
By SAURABH JHA, MD The COVID-19 pandemic has been a testing time for the already testy academic discourse. Decisions have had to be made with partial information. Information has come in drizzles, showers and downpours. The velocity with which new information has arrived has outstripped our ability to make sense of it. On top of that, the science has been politicized in a polarized country with a polarizing president at its helm. As the country awoke to an unprecedented economic lockdown in the middle of March, John Ioannidis, professor of epidemiology at Stanford University and one of the most cited physician sc...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Public Health John Ioannidis Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

Digital Health Ventures That Flew Too Close To The Sun
1.5 billion: that’s the number, in dollars, Forbes put for Proteus’ valuation last year. Dubbed as a healthcare unicorn, the startup even raised over $500 million in venture capital. It made headlines for developing the first-ever FDA-approved digital pill, one equipped with an ingestible and trackable sensor to monitor treatment compliance.  Researchers even proved the technology’s worth. In 2019, an independent study investigated the Proteus’ digital pill. They found it to be accurate, and even improved adherence of tuberculosis patients using oral pills equipped with Proteus’ s...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 7, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Genomics AI cancer IBM google deepmind theranos Watson fail digital pill proteus deus ex machina tech giants finances otsuka Nightingale Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 6th 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 5, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Far Too Little Consideration is Given to the Failure of the Immune System in the Old
There is no situation so terrible that it will not be silently accepted as set in stone, only given that it has lasted for long enough to become routine. So it is with aging, and all of the pain, suffering, and death that accompanies it. The present furor surrounding COVID-19 is unusual for casting at least a little light upon the point that infectious disease largely kills older people, and in very large numbers, year in and year out. In the normal course of affairs, no-one cares until it is their turn to be old, frail, and vulnerable. The immune system decays with age, becoming simultaneously overactive (inflammag...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Contact Tracing: 10 Unique Challenges of COVID-19
Conclusion The story of COVID-19 contact tracing is still in progress, and it’s not clear whether the ending will be success or failure. We hope that this essay has added depth to the opening words “Contact tracing for COVID-19 will be the most complex health investigation ever”. Vince Kuraitis, JD/MBA (@VinceKuraitis) is an independent healthcare strategy consultant with over 30 years’ experience across 150+ healthcare organizations. He blogs at e-CareManagement.com. Eric D. Perakslis, PhD (@eperakslis) is a Rubenstein Fellow at Duke University. Deven McGraw , JD, MPH, LLM (@h...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy The Health Data Goldilocks Dilemma: Sharing? Privacy? Both? Deven McGraw Eric Perakslis Vince Kuraitis Source Type: blogs

Here ’ s How You Can Define ‘ Being Nice ’ on Your Own Terms
“Don’t trade your authenticity for approval.” ~ Unknown As a nice person, I am often conflicted because sometimes I don’t enjoy being nice. Sometimes I act nice out of moral obligation or because I’m trying to be consistent with my perceived identity. Do you view yourself as “nice”? Do others describe you as “nice”? Do you always enjoy being “nice”? If you are unsure how you are perceived by others, ask friends and family to describe you. I’ve been told how nice I am all my life, by family, friends, coworkers, and even bosses. It was a huge part of my...
Source: World of Psychology - June 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Personal Personality Publishers Self-Help Tiny Buddha Authenticity Being nice people pleaser personal identity Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 3rd June 2020
Some things you may need to know.  Nothing last week as I was " on holiday " , so two weeks'worth this time.COVID-19A systematic scoping review of COVID-19 during pregnancy and childbirth (International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology)ResearchProgression to type 2 diabetes in women with a known history of gestational diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis (BMJ)**Leicester authors**Comparative impact of pharmacological treatments for gestational diabetes on neonatal anthropometry independent of maternal glycaemic control: A systematic review and meta-analysis (PLoS Medicine)Maternal cardiovas...
Source: Browsing - June 3, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

The new words from the coronavirus pandemic
With any new illness comes metaphor. It is humanity ’s attempt to incorporate the mystery of disease into our own stories. We like to personify illness, give it human characteristics as a way of visualizing it. We name its actions to help lessen its unpredictability. Tuberculosis consumed. Syphilis punished. AIDS invaded. Cancer grows. COVID-19 qua rantines separate […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 28, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/susan-maclellan-tobert" rel="tag" > Susan MacLellan-Tobert, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Why Some Countries Have Fared Better in Fighting COVID-19
There are more than 1.2 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States right now with nearly 80,000 related deaths on record. This number is greater than a quarter of the total deaths suffered worldwide.  What has America gotten wrong in its response to the deadly virus, and what have other countries done right?   New Zealand, South Africa, and Vietnam—even sharing a border with China where the virus originated —all have experienced relatively few cases and minimal deaths from COVID-19.  Our co-founder and infectious disease expert, Dr. Stephen Berger shared his thoughts ...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 12, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: News Press Source Type: blogs

Tree in Bud Appearance: CT
This is 13 year old child with mother who is sputum positive for TB. CT scan shows Tree in Bud lesions showing an appearance of multiple areas of centrilobular nodules with a linear branching pattern. This finding is considered classical for endobronchial TB as in this case. However, has been described in other conditions as well.Tree in Bud appearance Endobronchial infections like pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis with mucus plugging in cystic fibrosis are other classical causes.Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradproviders.com Mail us ...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - May 12, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Can AI and radiographs help in resource-poor areas for the fight against COVID-19?
Conclusion  With new evidence emerging every day and with COVID-19 guidance and protocols adapting responsively, the national responses vary widely across the globe. However, Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea have shown that aggressive and proactive testing plays a crucial role in containing the spread of the disease.  We believe AI has great potential for helping doctors quantify and monitor COVID progression from a patient’s chest X-rays – this will help determine treatment pathways faster and thus slow any surges in emergency cases. AI will also play a critical role in expanding screening for...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Tech bhargava reddy manoj tld pooja rao preetham srinivas qure.ai tarun raj Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health AdWatch: An arthritis ad in 4 parts
Perhaps you’ve grown as weary as I have of repeated arthritis ads. They appear in frequent rotation on television, online, and in magazines, promoting Enbrel, Humira, Otezla, Xeljanz, and others. If you’ve actually read or listened to these ads, you might have felt perplexed at certain points. Here’s a quick rundown on what they’re saying — and not saying — in one of those ads. “The clock is ticking” Part 1: A teakettle whistles on the stove and a disembodied voice speaks as this ad for Humira opens. “This is your wakeup call. If you have moderate to severe rheumatoid a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health Ad Watch: An arthritis ad in 4 parts
Perhaps you’ve grown as weary as I have of repeated arthritis ads. They appear in frequent rotation on television, online, and in magazines, promoting Enbrel, Humira, Otezla, Xeljanz, and others. If you’ve actually read or listened to these ads, you might have felt perplexed at certain points. Here’s a quick rundown on what they’re saying — and not saying — in one of those ads. “The clock is ticking” Part 1: A teakettle whistles on the stove and a disembodied voice speaks as this ad for Humira opens. “This is your wakeup call. If you have moderate to severe rheumatoid a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Inflammation Source Type: blogs

Leadership During a Healthcare Crisis: Kaiser Permanente ’s Response to COVID-19
A Conversation with Dr. Richard Isaacs, CEO of The Permanente Medical Group and the Mid Atlantic Permanente Medical Group By AJAY KOHLI, MD Organizations aren’t built in crises. Their mettle, their history and their leadership define how organizations adapt and succeed, particularly in difficult times. Of the three, the most important quality is leadership. In this regard, Kaiser Permanente is leading the way in healthcare delivery. I had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Richard Isaacs, CEO of The Permanente Medical Group and The MidAtlantic Permanente Medical Group, to discuss the strategic vision an...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Hospitals Medical Practice Ajay Kohli Kaiser Permanente Mid Atlantic Permanente Medical Group Pandemic Richard Isaacs Source Type: blogs

Health Care Scope of Practice Laws Reveal Another Weakness in Response to COVID-19 Pandemic
Jeffrey A. SingerOn March 24 Arizona Governor Doug Ducey issuedanexecutive order allowing CRNA ’s (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists) to practice independently of physicians or surgeons, thus adding needed personnel to the health care work force during this public health emergency. Guidelines issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services state that nurse anesthetists should be “supervised” by a physician, thus preventing these well ‐​trained specialized nurses from providing anesthesia independently while freeing up physician anesthesiologists so more patients can receive ca...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 26, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

SI Joint TB - Teaching Video
Presenting a brief teaching video on SI joint Tuberculosis and its Radiological findings.Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradproviders.com Mail us at sales@teleradproviders.com (Source: Sumer's Radiology Site)
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - March 25, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Time to redefine normal body temperature?
In this study, researchers analyzed temperature recordings from three periods of time over 157 years: 1860–1940: A mix of armpit and oral temperatures of nearly 24,000 veterans of the Civil War were measured. 1971–1975: Oral temperatures of more than 15,000 people from a large population study (the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) were analyzed. 2007–2017: Oral temperatures of more than 150,000 people in another large research project (the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment) were reviewed. During the nearly 160 years covered by the analysis, the average oral...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Fears: What the AIDS Battle Should Teach Us About COVID-19
By ANISH KOKA, MD As the globe faces a novel, highly transmissible, lethal virus, I am most struck by a medicine cabinet that is embarrassingly empty for doctors in this battle.  This means much of the debate centers on mitigation of spread of the virus.  Tempers flare over discussions on travel bans, social distancing, and self quarantines, yet the inescapable fact remains that the medical community can do little more than support the varying fractions of patients who progress from mild to severe and life threatening disease.  This isn’t meant to minimize the massive efforts brought to bear to keep...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: CORVID-19 Health Policy Patients Physicians AIDS Anish Koka AZT coronavirus COVID-19 FDA novel coronavirus Pandemic Source Type: blogs

Using Ultrasound for Paracentesis
​Paracentesis can be a quick and simple procedure with the right equipment and a well-rehearsed approach. It's important to practice this skill in the procedure lab and to familiarize yourself with the kit in your department a few times a year. This month, we focus on paracentesis set-up and basics, and next month we will review the nuts and bolts of completing the procedure.Important equipment for paracentesis: Five or six collection bottles, antiseptic prep, and a paracentesis kit. Consider longer needles for abdominal walls thicker than 2.5 cm.Grab the ultrasound and a pen. Position your patient at a 45-degree angle, ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - February 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence vs. Tuberculosis – Part 2
By SAURABH JHA, MD Clever Hans Preetham Srinivas, the head of the chest radiograph project in Qure.ai, summoned Bhargava Reddy, Manoj Tadepalli, and Tarun Raj to the meeting room. “Get ready for an all-nighter, boys,” said Preetham. Qure’s scientists began investigating the algorithm’s mysteriously high performance on chest radiographs from a new hospital. To recap, the algorithm had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 1 – that’s 100 % on multiple-choice question test. “Someone leaked the paper to AI,” laughed Manoj. “I...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Health Technology @roguerad AI Saurabh Jha TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 20th 2020
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Theorizing on Historical Trends in Body Temperature, Burden of Inflammation, and Life Expectancy
In this study, we analyzed 677,423 human body temperature measurements from three different cohort populations spanning 157 years of measurement and 197 birth years. We found that men born in the early 19th century had temperatures 0.59°C higher than men today, with a monotonic decrease of -0.03°C per birth decade. Temperature has also decreased in women by -0.32°C since the 1890s with a similar rate of decline (-0.029°C per birth decade). Although one might posit that the differences among cohorts reflect systematic measurement bias due to the varied thermometers and methods used to obtain temperatures, we...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Ride the Fluid Wave Before Performing a Paracentesis
​Before you break out the bottles for a paracentesis, you may want to consider doing a test for ascites. Many procedures require executing an old-school test before even looking at a result or grabbing an ultrasound machine. Knowing what to look for on a physical exam may guide your practice and intervention dramatically. Using noninvasive tools first could help your patient avoid other tedious or unnecessary testing, which may also result in lost time. Incorporating ultrasound into your practice may also help you nail a diagnosis or allow you to perform a procedure better than you expected.A markedly distended abdomen d...
Source: The Procedural Pause - January 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Look Back at 2019
I've always been an optimist.  I believe humans are basically good and that the nice guy will win eventually.After traveling 400,000 miles to 40 countries in 2019, helping government, academia, and industry, my view of the world has not changed.Despite our focus on the negative 24x7 news cycle, 2019 has been thebest year for humanity in history.My best memories, looking back at 2019:*Serving the Gates Foundation in South Africa and Northern India.  Experiencing the rollout of technology enabled platforms that reduced HIV disease burden and improved diagnosis/treatment of tuberculosis.*Working with mayors and...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - December 31, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence vs. Tuberculosis, Part 1
By SAURABH JHA, MD Slumdog TB No one knows who gave Rahul Roy tuberculosis. Roy’s charmed life as a successful trader involved traveling in his Mercedes C class between his apartment on the plush Nepean Sea Road in South Mumbai and offices in Bombay Stock Exchange. He cared little for Mumbai’s weather. He seldom rolled down his car windows – his ambient atmosphere, optimized for his comfort, rarely changed. Historically TB, or “consumption” as it was known, was a Bohemian malady; the chronic suffering produced a rhapsody which produced fine art. TB was fashionable in Victorian Britain...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Saurabh Jha TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 4th 2019
In this study, we hypothesized that moderately and chronically reducing ACh could attenuate the deleterious effects of aging on NMJs and skeletal muscles. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed NMJs and muscle fibers from heterozygous transgenic mice with reduced expression of the vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT), VKDHet mice, which present with approximately 30% less synaptic ACh compared to control mice. Because ACh is constitutively decreased in VKDHet, we first analyzed developing NMJs and muscle fibers. We found no obvious morphological or molecular differences between NMJs and muscle fibers of VKDHet and contro...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Perspective on Longevity Biotech Investment from James Peyer of Kronos BioVentures
James Peyer, formerly of Apollo Ventures and now at the larger Kronos BioVentures, has a range of interesting views on the new and growing longevity biotechnology industry. Apollo Ventures was one of the earlier longevity-focused funds to emerge from the comparatively small community of scientists, patient advocates, and investors enthusiastic to accelerate progress towards the treatment of aging as a medical condition. The presentation here was given earlier this year at the Ending Age-Related Diseases conference organized by the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation. In the matter of creating new medical therapies, t...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 30, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Ping Pong Balls in the Lungs
​"She's worried I had a heart attack."That was the answer I got from the 70ish-year-old patient pointing at his wife when I asked why he came to the emergency department. She quickly added, "He had terrible pain four days ago on the right side, and now he gets winded when he walks."I had already seen his ECG, so I assured her that it appeared normal. I was going to order a chest x-ray, however, because his lungs sounds were pretty quiet. She said he had COPD, and wanted to know if he needed an inhaler.The last time I had seen something like this was in medical school 30 years ago. At that time, I was ...
Source: Lions and Tigers and Bears - October 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Indigenous Medicine – From Illegal to Integral
Brooke Warren Phuoc Le By PHUOC LE, MD and BROOKE WARREN In the 2020 Summer Olympics, we will undoubtedly see large, red circles down the arms and backs of many Olympians. These spots are a side-effect of cupping, a treatment originating from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to reduce pain. TCM is a globally used Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), but it still battles its critics who think it is only a belief system, rather than a legitimate medical practice. Even so, the usage of TCM continues to grow. This led the National Institute of Health (NIH) to sponsor a meeting in 1997 to determine...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Arc Health Brooke Warren complementary and alternative medicine cupping indigenous medicine Phuoc Le TCM traditional chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

There ’s a new cure for the deadliest strain of tuberculosis. So what’s that mean for the REACH Initiative’s HIV research in South Africa?
“This strain of tuberculosis (TB) is XDR-TB – extremely drug resistant tuberculosis– and is, as the name implies, highly resistant to the standard treatments,” says professor and TB/HIV expert Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, ANP-BC, AACRN, FAAN. HIV weakens the immune system, increasing the risk of TB in people with HIV. Dr. Farley’s Center, The REACH The post There’s a new cure for the deadliest strain of tuberculosis. So what’s that mean for the REACH Initiative’s HIV research in South Africa? appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - August 16, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Online Editor Tags: On the Pulse antimicrobial resistance hiv REACH initiative TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Even Low Levels of Infection Can Cause Cardiac Dysfunction in Older Individuals
We examined how mycobacterial infection and inflammaging catalyze the decline in cardiovascular function in the elderly. Young (3 months) and old (18 month) female C57BL/6 mice were infected with a sub-lethal dose of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), an NTM. We observed no differences in the M. avium bacterial numbers in the lung, liver, or spleen between young and old M. avium infected mice. However, through the course of M. avium infection, old mice developed severe dysrhythmia and developed pericarditis. Moreover, the hearts of M. avium infected old mice had increased cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, expression of pro-infla...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

RNA Polymerase: A Target for New Antibiotic Drugs?
DNA, with its double-helix shape, is the stuff of genes. But genes themselves are only “recipes” for protein molecules, which are molecules that do the real heavy lifting (or do much of the work) inside cells. Artist interpretation of RNAP grasping and unwinding a DNA double helix. Credit: Wei Lin and Richard H. Ebright. Here’s how it works. A molecular machine called RNA polymerase (RNAP) travels along DNA to find a place where a gene begins. RNAP uses a crab-claw-like structure to grasp and unwind the DNA double helix at that spot. RNAP then copies (“transcribes”) the gene into messe...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - August 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Genes Bacteria Cellular Processes DNA Infectious Diseases Medicines Proteins RNA Source Type: blogs

Is it SAFE to be grain-free?
Listen to critics of the Wheat Belly lifestyle and you’d think that, by banishing all things wheat and grains from your life, you will be excommunicated from your church, tossed out of your club, ostracized by friends and family, and suffer dire health consequences like heart disease and colon cancer. After all, they say that you are eliminating an entire food group and will be crippled by lack of fiber and nutrients. Worse, our focus on increasing our intake of fats and oils will get you a heart attack, three stents, or bypass surgery and you’ll be obliged to take Lipitor and Repatha for a lifetime. First of a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 25, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle grain-free Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Why A Diverse and Inclusive Healthcare Innovation Workforce Matters
By ANDRÉ BLACKMAN There I was, my 10th-grade science fair. My mother made sure I had a tie that fit properly and a shirt that was perfectly pressed. I stood among my peers with our cardboard presentation displays highlighting what we did to make it to this point. I was a little nervous but also extremely proud of myself and excited to see the looks on the judge’s faces when they saw what my project was about: “The Effects of Enzymes on DNA” Boom. Oh, I wasn’t doing something that many people had seen already — I was working inside an NIH facility with a brilliant scient...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech Health Technology digital health Diversity Healthcare Hiring inclusion talent workforce; Source Type: blogs

AI Platform for Cognitive Performance Training
This study, published in journal Advanced Therapeutics, describes the use of CURATE.AI for improving trainee performance on a US Air Force flight simulator program, a task that is very cognitively challenging. In the past, the same research team used the CURATE.AI software to develop a personalized immunosuppressant dosing schedule after organ transplant, optimize drug discovery libraries, and study in vitro and in vivo models of disease, including multiple myeloma and tuberculosis. In the study, participants underwent training with the flight simulator in low, medium, and high intensity levels. CURATE.AI characterized the...
Source: Medgadget - June 10, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Education Informatics Net News Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 27th 2019
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Considering the Experience of Being One of the Last Mortals
With the development of rejuvenation therapies underway, and accelerating, somewhere ahead lies a dividing line. Some people will be the last to age to death, too comprehensively damaged for the technologies of the time to recover. Everyone else will live indefinitely in youth and health, protected from aging by periodic repair of the underlying cell and tissue damage that causes dysfunction and disease. Where is that dividing line? No one can say in certainty. I look at the children of today, with long lives ahead of them, and find it hard to believe that in a hundred years the problem won't be solved well in time for the...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

The latest deadly superbug — and why it’s not time to panic
I have to admit it: recent news reports about a newly described “superbug” are worrisome and at least a little bit terrifying. This time, it’s not a flesh-eating bacterium or drug-resistant tuberculosis — in fact, it’s not a bacterial infection at all. It’s a fungus called Candida auris (C. auris). If the first part of the name sounds familiar, that may be because other Candida species (such as Candida albicans, glabrata, and tropicalis) cause common vaginal and skin infections. They’re often called yeast infections and while quite bothersome, they only rarely cause serious illness...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Health trends Infectious diseases Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

6 Symptoms of Postpartum Depression and 6 Ways to Recover
According to a 2013 study published in JAMA Psychiatry, one out of seven mothers suffers from postpartum depression (PPD). That’s 14 percent of all new moms. Katherine Stone, founder of Postpartum Progress, makes a good point that more women will suffer from postpartum depression and related illnesses this year than the combined number of new cases for men and women of tuberculosis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. Even though, according to Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, PPD is the most common comp...
Source: World of Psychology - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Women's Issues Apathy Depressive Episode Postpartum Source Type: blogs

Measles, tuberculosis, and wheat
Humans have made many dietary mistakes over the years but two mistakes, in particular, stand out: close contact with animals, mostly ruminants, who conveyed their diseases to us and the adoption of the seeds of grasses as human food. These two practices not only changed the course of human history but also human disease. Over the last several centuries, Westerners have populated North America, South America, Pacific islands and other regions. Equipped with superior tools of warfare such as swords and muskets, contact with Westerners decimated indigenous people such as the millions of native Americans, Aztecs, and Amazonian...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 17, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grain-free grains joint pain Source Type: blogs

Trocar during Times of Trauma
​Seventy-five percent of trauma injuries involve some kind of thoracic insult, a quarter of which need a procedural intervention like a chest tube. (Surg Clin North Am 2007;87[1]:95; http://bit.ly/2HaoX90.) Long-term illness, lung disease, and post-operative complications may cause pleural effusions or a pneumothorax, so treating these conditions quickly can significantly decrease patient morbidity and mortality. Other indications for chest tube placement include:Trauma: Pneumothorax, hemopneumothorax, or tension pneumothoraxLong-term illness: Pleural effusion (cancer, pneumonia)Infection: Empyema, purulent pleuriti...
Source: The Procedural Pause - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Degree escalation and doctoral education are sinking the occupational therapy profession
Occupational therapy started on a simple premise - that man, through the use of his hands as they are energized by mind and will, can influence the state of his own health.  That statement was provided to the profession by Mary Reilly, our greatest theoretician.It is a simple concept, borne out of a core philosophy of pragmatism and infused with a dose of all the good intentions of the moral treatment movement.  If you carefully read that core philosophy of occupational therapy you will hear the Emersonian reverberations of self-reliance:'Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. '  That is wh...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - March 12, 2019 Category: Occupational Health Tags: OT Education OT practice philosophy Source Type: blogs

Pediatric Conjunctivitis a Simple Diagnosis Until It Isn’t
​Conjunctivitis is a common condition and easy enough to treat, but several uncommon conjunctivitis syndromes require more care and should not be missed.Conjunctivitis is either infectious (viral or bacterial) or noninfectious (allergic or nonallergic). Viral infections are more common in adults, bacterial ones in children, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Adults tend to have more S. aureus infections, while the other pathogens are more common in children. An adenovirus is typically responsible for viral-associated infections in conjunct...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - March 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 25th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

John W. Campbell, Editor of Astounding Science Fiction, Described Actuarial Escape Velocity in 1949
Some of the voices of the past can appear entirely contemporary, because they saw further and with greater clarity than most of their peers. John W. Campbell, editor of Astounding Science-Fiction Magazine, died of heart disease at age 61 in 1971. In 1949 he wrote an editorial on the future of medicine, aging, and longevity that wouldn't seem out of place today. He anticipated what we presently call actuarial escape velocity, or longevity escape velocity, the idea that gains in life span through progress in medical technology allow greater time to benefit from further gains - and eventually, we are repaired more rapidly tha...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Dispatch from India
I spent last week in Bihar, an area of Northern India near Nepal.  The best way to describe the journey is in pictures.Our small team visited villages along the Ganges to the east of Patna, tracing the path of patients from seeking care to diagnosis to treatment to compliance to wellness.  We met with patients, providers, field officers (think of them as care managers), chemists (pharmacists), and labs.   Here's what we experienced:The villages had hand pumped water supplies, electricity and 4G cellular connections.  Cows and goats were a part of many households.A unique telemedicine program f...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - January 15, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs