There ’s a new cure for the deadliest strain of tuberculosis. So what’s that mean for the REACH Initiative’s HIV research in South Africa?
“This strain of tuberculosis (TB) is XDR-TB – extremely drug resistant tuberculosis– and is, as the name implies, highly resistant to the standard treatments,” says professor and TB/HIV expert Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, ANP-BC, AACRN, FAAN. HIV weakens the immune system, increasing the risk of TB in people with HIV. Dr. Farley’s Center, The REACH The post There’s a new cure for the deadliest strain of tuberculosis. So what’s that mean for the REACH Initiative’s HIV research in South Africa? appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - August 16, 2019 Category: Nursing Authors: Online Editor Tags: On the Pulse antimicrobial resistance hiv REACH initiative TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Even Low Levels of Infection Can Cause Cardiac Dysfunction in Older Individuals
We examined how mycobacterial infection and inflammaging catalyze the decline in cardiovascular function in the elderly. Young (3 months) and old (18 month) female C57BL/6 mice were infected with a sub-lethal dose of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), an NTM. We observed no differences in the M. avium bacterial numbers in the lung, liver, or spleen between young and old M. avium infected mice. However, through the course of M. avium infection, old mice developed severe dysrhythmia and developed pericarditis. Moreover, the hearts of M. avium infected old mice had increased cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, expression of pro-infla...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

RNA Polymerase: A Target for New Antibiotic Drugs?
DNA, with its double-helix shape, is the stuff of genes. But genes themselves are only “recipes” for protein molecules, which are molecules that do the real heavy lifting (or do much of the work) inside cells. Artist interpretation of RNAP grasping and unwinding a DNA double helix. Credit: Wei Lin and Richard H. Ebright. Here’s how it works. A molecular machine called RNA polymerase (RNAP) travels along DNA to find a place where a gene begins. RNAP uses a crab-claw-like structure to grasp and unwind the DNA double helix at that spot. RNAP then copies (“transcribes”) the gene into messe...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - August 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Genes Bacteria Cellular Processes DNA Infectious Diseases Medicines Proteins RNA Source Type: blogs

Is it SAFE to be grain-free?
Listen to critics of the Wheat Belly lifestyle and you’d think that, by banishing all things wheat and grains from your life, you will be excommunicated from your church, tossed out of your club, ostracized by friends and family, and suffer dire health consequences like heart disease and colon cancer. After all, they say that you are eliminating an entire food group and will be crippled by lack of fiber and nutrients. Worse, our focus on increasing our intake of fats and oils will get you a heart attack, three stents, or bypass surgery and you’ll be obliged to take Lipitor and Repatha for a lifetime. First of a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 25, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle grain-free Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Why A Diverse and Inclusive Healthcare Innovation Workforce Matters
By ANDRÉ BLACKMAN There I was, my 10th-grade science fair. My mother made sure I had a tie that fit properly and a shirt that was perfectly pressed. I stood among my peers with our cardboard presentation displays highlighting what we did to make it to this point. I was a little nervous but also extremely proud of myself and excited to see the looks on the judge’s faces when they saw what my project was about: “The Effects of Enzymes on DNA” Boom. Oh, I wasn’t doing something that many people had seen already — I was working inside an NIH facility with a brilliant scient...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech Health Technology digital health Diversity Healthcare Hiring inclusion talent workforce; Source Type: blogs

AI Platform for Cognitive Performance Training
This study, published in journal Advanced Therapeutics, describes the use of CURATE.AI for improving trainee performance on a US Air Force flight simulator program, a task that is very cognitively challenging. In the past, the same research team used the CURATE.AI software to develop a personalized immunosuppressant dosing schedule after organ transplant, optimize drug discovery libraries, and study in vitro and in vivo models of disease, including multiple myeloma and tuberculosis. In the study, participants underwent training with the flight simulator in low, medium, and high intensity levels. CURATE.AI characterized the...
Source: Medgadget - June 10, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Education Informatics Net News Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 27th 2019
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Considering the Experience of Being One of the Last Mortals
With the development of rejuvenation therapies underway, and accelerating, somewhere ahead lies a dividing line. Some people will be the last to age to death, too comprehensively damaged for the technologies of the time to recover. Everyone else will live indefinitely in youth and health, protected from aging by periodic repair of the underlying cell and tissue damage that causes dysfunction and disease. Where is that dividing line? No one can say in certainty. I look at the children of today, with long lives ahead of them, and find it hard to believe that in a hundred years the problem won't be solved well in time for the...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

The latest deadly superbug — and why it’s not time to panic
I have to admit it: recent news reports about a newly described “superbug” are worrisome and at least a little bit terrifying. This time, it’s not a flesh-eating bacterium or drug-resistant tuberculosis — in fact, it’s not a bacterial infection at all. It’s a fungus called Candida auris (C. auris). If the first part of the name sounds familiar, that may be because other Candida species (such as Candida albicans, glabrata, and tropicalis) cause common vaginal and skin infections. They’re often called yeast infections and while quite bothersome, they only rarely cause serious illness...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Health trends Infectious diseases Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

6 Symptoms of Postpartum Depression and 6 Ways to Recover
According to a 2013 study published in JAMA Psychiatry, one out of seven mothers suffers from postpartum depression (PPD). That’s 14 percent of all new moms. Katherine Stone, founder of Postpartum Progress, makes a good point that more women will suffer from postpartum depression and related illnesses this year than the combined number of new cases for men and women of tuberculosis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. Even though, according to Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, PPD is the most common comp...
Source: World of Psychology - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Women's Issues Apathy Depressive Episode Postpartum Source Type: blogs

Measles, tuberculosis, and wheat
Humans have made many dietary mistakes over the years but two mistakes, in particular, stand out: close contact with animals, mostly ruminants, who conveyed their diseases to us and the adoption of the seeds of grasses as human food. These two practices not only changed the course of human history but also human disease. Over the last several centuries, Westerners have populated North America, South America, Pacific islands and other regions. Equipped with superior tools of warfare such as swords and muskets, contact with Westerners decimated indigenous people such as the millions of native Americans, Aztecs, and Amazonian...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 17, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grain-free grains joint pain Source Type: blogs

Trocar during Times of Trauma
​Seventy-five percent of trauma injuries involve some kind of thoracic insult, a quarter of which need a procedural intervention like a chest tube. (Surg Clin North Am 2007;87[1]:95; http://bit.ly/2HaoX90.) Long-term illness, lung disease, and post-operative complications may cause pleural effusions or a pneumothorax, so treating these conditions quickly can significantly decrease patient morbidity and mortality. Other indications for chest tube placement include:Trauma: Pneumothorax, hemopneumothorax, or tension pneumothoraxLong-term illness: Pleural effusion (cancer, pneumonia)Infection: Empyema, purulent pleuriti...
Source: The Procedural Pause - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Degree escalation and doctoral education are sinking the occupational therapy profession
Occupational therapy started on a simple premise - that man, through the use of his hands as they are energized by mind and will, can influence the state of his own health.  That statement was provided to the profession by Mary Reilly, our greatest theoretician.It is a simple concept, borne out of a core philosophy of pragmatism and infused with a dose of all the good intentions of the moral treatment movement.  If you carefully read that core philosophy of occupational therapy you will hear the Emersonian reverberations of self-reliance:'Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. '  That is wh...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - March 12, 2019 Category: Occupational Health Tags: OT Education OT practice philosophy Source Type: blogs

Pediatric Conjunctivitis a Simple Diagnosis Until It Isn’t
​Conjunctivitis is a common condition and easy enough to treat, but several uncommon conjunctivitis syndromes require more care and should not be missed.Conjunctivitis is either infectious (viral or bacterial) or noninfectious (allergic or nonallergic). Viral infections are more common in adults, bacterial ones in children, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Adults tend to have more S. aureus infections, while the other pathogens are more common in children. An adenovirus is typically responsible for viral-associated infections in conjunct...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - March 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 25th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

John W. Campbell, Editor of Astounding Science Fiction, Described Actuarial Escape Velocity in 1949
Some of the voices of the past can appear entirely contemporary, because they saw further and with greater clarity than most of their peers. John W. Campbell, editor of Astounding Science-Fiction Magazine, died of heart disease at age 61 in 1971. In 1949 he wrote an editorial on the future of medicine, aging, and longevity that wouldn't seem out of place today. He anticipated what we presently call actuarial escape velocity, or longevity escape velocity, the idea that gains in life span through progress in medical technology allow greater time to benefit from further gains - and eventually, we are repaired more rapidly tha...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Dispatch from India
I spent last week in Bihar, an area of Northern India near Nepal.  The best way to describe the journey is in pictures.Our small team visited villages along the Ganges to the east of Patna, tracing the path of patients from seeking care to diagnosis to treatment to compliance to wellness.  We met with patients, providers, field officers (think of them as care managers), chemists (pharmacists), and labs.   Here's what we experienced:The villages had hand pumped water supplies, electricity and 4G cellular connections.  Cows and goats were a part of many households.A unique telemedicine program f...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - January 15, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly and Autoimmune Diseases
The Wheat Belly lifestyle begins with elimination of the worst and most dominant of all grains in the diet, semi-dwarf wheat products, followed by elimination of its closely-related brethren in other grains. This alone is a powerful start in reversing the 200-some diseases of autoimmunity. We now know that the gliadin protein of wheat and related proteins in other grains trigger increased intestinal permeability that initiates the process, as highly inflammatory compounds, such as lipopolysaccharide from bacterial cell walls, are permitted entry into the body. We also know that gliadin itself gains entry into the bloo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 11, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation wheat belly Source Type: blogs

The Meaning of Life (as a CIO)
As I approach 60 and reflect on over 40 years in the healthcare IT industry I sometimes feel that I ’ve transitioned from a rogue upstart to the leader of the status quo - always about to be disrupted. I’m no longer a trouble maker, I calm the troubled healthcare technology waters.  If I ’m not careful, that could mean I’ll become a rate limiting step to radical change since I’ve been shaped by a lifetime of experience that started with punch cards, paper tape, and Fortran.The themes I ’ll write about twice a week in 2019 will be about exploring new technology around the world and i...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - January 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

When AI Looks at X-Rays: Interview with Qure.ai CEO, Prashant Warier
If you follow the recent advances in medical technology and artificial intelligence, you may have heard people make bold claims that AI will replace tomorrow’s doctors. While there are still ways to go for technology to reach these sci-fi levels, many companies are actively designing AI systems that will accompany doctors or assist them with their daily tasks. One particularly challenging task has been to enable algorithms to examine medical images and make intelligent conclusions, create reports, or provide recommendations. Medgadget recently had the chance to ask Qure.ai’s CEO, Prashant Warier, about the stri...
Source: Medgadget - January 3, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Informatics Radiology Source Type: blogs

Health lessons from the last North American hunter-gatherer
One of the last true hunter-gatherers in North America was believed to be a man called Ishi with a fascinating tale of the clash between indigenous cultures and early 20th century America. A study of this man provides some insights into the lives of people living something close to a pre-Neolithic lifestyle, i.e., a life without agriculture, grains, and processed food.   “An aboriginal Indian, clad in a rough canvas shirt which reached to his knees … was taken into custody last evening by Sheriff Webber and Constable Toland at the Ward Slaughter-house on the Quincy road. He had evidently been dr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 21, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates gluten grain-free grains wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Bringing Emergency Medicine to Eswatini
​BY ADERONKE SUSAN AKAPO, DO; KATHLEEN ANNE ROCCO, MD; EDWARD KAKISH, DO; & KRIS BRICKMAN, MDEswatini, known as Swaziland until April 2018, is a small South African country approximately the size of New Jersey. It has 1.3 million people, and is bordered by South Africa and Mozambique.The country primarily comprises rural tribal areas with two major cities, Manzini and Mbabane, in the central portion of the country. Eswatini holds the unfortunate distinction of having the highest HIV rate in the world—approximately 26 percent of its population. Emergency medicine within this small country is clearly in its devel...
Source: Going Global - December 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The Global Impact of Health IT – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/30 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Vanessa Carter (@_FaceSA) on the topic of “The Global Impact of Health IT”. Global health pandemics like antibiotic and antimicrobial resistance are among the most critical issues to tackle and in future will require robust, harmonious data surveillance systems along with mass co-operation between the animal, human and environmental health sectors across every country [1]. This is known as One Health [2]. WHO initiatives like GLAS...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 27, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Healthcare Healthcare AI HealthCare IT #HITsm Topics Antibiotic Resistance GLASS Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System Global Health One Health Vanessa Carter Source Type: blogs

Can Money Buy You Longevity And Health?
Better treatment options, dietary conditions and (perhaps) less stress could make the life of the rich also healthier. However, when it comes to longevity and aging, do they really have better chances? Can the upper 0.1 percent secure their health for long decades or even reverse the process of growing old? Could society somehow also benefit from the quest of the richest for longevity? Are health and longevity on the shopping list? You can have an awful lot of things with money. For a starter, you can buy ice cream or Nutella, which are synonymous to self-love, so the Beatles was only partly right in singing that you can&r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Cyborgization Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers age aging aging research blood eternal life genetics immortality Innovation life sciences longevity silicon valley stem cell Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 19th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

More Evidence for the Genetic Contribution to Longevity to be Smaller than Suspected
How much of the natural human variation in longevity and pace of aging has its roots in genetics, and how much is determined by lifestyle and environment? Some gene variants result in beneficial metabolic alterations such as lower cholesterol or a greater resilience in the face of the molecular damage of late old age. Lifestyle choices such as calorie intake and exercise clearly influence long term health and mortality. Similarly, exposure to pathogens and pollutants can accelerate the pace of aging via their interaction with the immune system. The consensus of the past few decades had come to be that the split is around 2...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Migrant Caravan, Central America, and Vaccination Rates
Many commentators have recentlywritten andsaid that members of the migrant caravan and Central American immigrants in general are diseased.   Former Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent David Ward claimed that the migrants are “coming in with diseases such as smallpox,” a disease that the World Health Organization (WHO) certified as beingeradicated in 1980.   One hopes Mr. Ward was more careful in enforcing American immigration law than in spreading rumors that migrants are carrying one of the deadliest diseases in human history nearly 40 years after it was eradicated from the human population.&n...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 1, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Abdominal Cocoon: DAMS Unplugged
Presenting a brief video on case of abdominal tuberculosis. Abdominal cocoon or sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction. Thick  peritoneum encasing the small bowel is the main feature.  Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradproviders.com Mail us at sales@teleradproviders.com (Source: Sumer's Radiology Site)
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - October 31, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

What Do Measles, Tuberculosis, and Grains Have in Common?
What do measles, tuberculosis, and grains have in common? For that matter, what do anthrax, influenza, and brucellosis also share in common with grains? All the conditions listed are examples of zoonoses, i.e., diseases contracted by humans from animals. When humans first invited domesticated grazing creatures–cows, sheep, goats–into our huts, adobe homes, or caves, often sleeping in the same room, using them for milk or food, we acquired many of their diseases. These diseases were unknown prior to the human domestication of grazing ruminants. The process of animal domestication changed the course of human civi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 21, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates gluten gluten-free grain-free grains tuberculosis wheat belly zoonoses Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 22nd 2018
In this report, we propose that the molecular mechanisms of beneficial actions of CR should be classified and discussed according to whether they operate under rich or insufficient energy resource conditions. Future studies of the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of CR should also consider the extent to which the signals/factors involved contribute to the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and other CR actions in each tissue or organ, and thereby lead to anti-aging and prolongevity. RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Infection as the Link Between Cellular Senescence, Autophagy, and Immunosenescence
This open access paper reviews the interactions between cellular senescence, autophagy, and immunosenescence, with chronic infection as a mediating mechanism. Given the present state of knowledge and biotechnology, it is challenging enough to look at any two aspects of the aging body and consider how they might interact in isolation, but this can only ever be a thin slice of the bigger picture. All systems and states in our biochemistry interact with one another in some way, directly or indirectly, and examining ever larger sets of relationships between greater numbers of systems and states is the path to greater understan...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 17, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Alcohol and your health: Is none better than a little?
It’s complicated. That’s the best way to describe the relationship between alcohol and health. As I’ve written about before, a number of studies have demonstrated health benefits with lower amounts of drinking. But if you drink too much alcohol (especially at inopportune times), there may be significant harms as well. Just how these balance out remains a matter of some debate and controversy. While it’s easy to say “too much alcohol is bad for you” (and then point out the litany of harms caused by alcohol, such as liver disease and motor vehicle accidents), it’s harder to answer th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Alcohol Health Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 17th 2018
In this study, we found that TXNIP deficiency induces accelerated senescent phenotypes of mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells under high glucose condition and that the induction of cellular ROS or AKT activation is critical for cellular senescence. Our results also revealed that TXNIP inhibits AKT activity by a direct interaction, which is upregulated by high glucose and H2O2 treatment. In addition, TXNIP knockout mice exhibited an increase in glucose uptake and aging-associated phenotypes including a decrease in energy metabolism and induction of cellular senescence and aging-associated gene expression. We propose that...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Debating the Microbial Hypothesis for Alzheimer's Disease
Why do only some older people develop the elevated levels of amyloid-β that start the amyloid cascade of Alzheimer's disease, leading to tau aggregation and consequent death and dysfunction of brain cells? If amyloid-β is the result of persistent infection by pathogens such as herpesviruses and lyme spirochetes that are, collectively, only present in 20% or so of the population, then perhaps that is the answer. This is the core of the microbial hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease, that amyloid-β is a feature of the innate immune system, and thus persistent infection of brain tissue will result in higher levels...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fake Reform Foisted on Us by Those who Benefit Most from the Current Dysfunction
ConclusionGiridharadas suggested inan interview in New York Magazine,What all that does is create this moral glow. And under the haze created by that glow, they ’re able to create a probable monopoly that has harmed the most sacred thing in America, which is our electoral process, while gutting the other most sacred thing in America, our free press. And they do itunder the cover of changing the world.Unfortunately, he apparently has not come up with what to do about this problem.  The best conclusion I can reach derives from the end of areview of his book by Joseph Stiglitz in the New York Times,Democracy and hi...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 5, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: conflicts of interest Gates Foundation health care foundations health care reform Johnson and Johnson Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Source Type: blogs

Why Cochrane is Wrong About Hypertension. Very Wrong.
By SWAPNIL HIREMATH, MD Archie Cochrane and the Cochrane Collaboration Archie Cochrane was born in Scotland, educated in London (King’s College, University College and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and worked in Cardiff, Wales. His work as a doctor during the Spanish Civil War and World War II, especially in a prisoner of war camp in Salonica, is credited with his push towards generating higher quality evidence. In his description of the clinical trial he conducted, he mentions James Lind as his hero. Ironically, that clinical trial – with weak randomization, open allocation, non-blindin...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: EBM Cochrane patient population risks Source Type: blogs

Why Cochrane is Wrong About Hypertension. Very Wrong.
By SWAPNIL HIREMATH MD Archie Cochrane and the Cochrane Collaboration Archie Cochrane was born in Scotland, educated in London (King’s College, University College and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and worked in Cardiff, Wales. His work as a doctor during the Spanish Civil War and World War II, especially in a prisoner of war camp in Salonica, is credited with his push towards generating higher quality evidence. In his description of the clinical trial he conducted, he mentions James Lind as his hero. Ironically, that clinical trial – with weak randomization, open allocation, non-blinding...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: EBM Source Type: blogs

Digital Technologies for Improving Hygiene in Health Facilities
150 years after Semmelweis advised fellow physicians to sanitize their hands to mitigate the effect of infections, the maintenance of hygiene is still a widespread problem in hospitals and the source of healthcare-associated infections. Now, technological solutions line up against microorganisms, bacteria, and fungi. Here are a few examples. 1 in 9 in-patients will die due to infection According to the US Center for Disease Control, studies show that on average, healthcare providers clean their hands less than half of the times they should. This significantly contributes to the spread of healthcare-associated infections (H...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Policy Makers clean digital digital health future HAI healthcare-associated infection hygiene Medicine robot robotics sensors technology trackers wearable Source Type: blogs

Digital Technologies for Improving Hygiene in Health Facilities
150 years after Semmelweis advised fellow physicians to sanitize their hands to mitigate the effect of infections, the maintenance of hygiene is still a widespread problem in hospitals and the source of healthcare-associated infections. Now, technological solutions line up against microorganisms, bacteria, and fungi. Here are a few examples. 1 in 9 in-patients will die due to infection According to the US Center for Disease Control, studies show that on average, healthcare providers clean their hands less than half of the times they should. This significantly contributes to the spread of healthcare-associated infections (H...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Policy Makers clean digital digital health future HAI healthcare-associated infection hygiene Medicine robot robotics sensors technology trackers wearable Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 009 Humongous HIV Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs

Social Determinants of Health Statistics in AtlasPlus
CDC’s AtlasPlus is a database of health statistics for public health professionals, policymakers, community leaders, researchers, students, and those interested in HIV, viral hepatitis, STDs or tuberculosis. This database provides statistics on these conditions at the state and county level. AtlasPlus was recently updated to include eleven new indicator related to HIV and indicators that reflect the social determinants of health. To learn more, visit the What’s New in AtlasPlus page. (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - June 25, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Erin Seger Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 008 Total TB Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 008 Peer Reviewer Dr McBride ID physician, Wisconsin TB affects 1/3rd of the population and one patient dies every 20 seconds from TB. Without treatment 50% of pulmonary TB patients will be dead in 5 years. In low to middle income countries both TB and HIV can be ubiquitous, poor compliance can lead to drug resistance and malnourished infants are highly susceptible. TB can be very complex and this post will hopefully give you the backbone t...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine Genexpert meningitis TB TB meningitis Tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 240
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 240. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1 Colonial India, under British rule may seem a strange place for medical ethics but during this time the ‘Cobra effect’ was observed. What is the Cobra effe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five advert aortic stenosis body slam cobra effect edgar allan poe informed consent toothpaste tradus et parvus wrestling Source Type: blogs

The Ethics of Keeping Alfie Alive
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs

Beating the Travel Bug & Innovation in Hand Sanitation: Interview with Zoono CSO Dr. Andrew Alexander
While flu season is drawing to a close, transmission of germs can still lead to colds and serious respiratory diseases. In few places are individuals more exposed to a multitude of unique germs and germ carriers than during travel. Unlike some forms of travel, such as buses, where an individual can choose to get off the vehicle or find an alternate transit option, like carpooling, air travel is much less flexible. Based on data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, in 2010, on average 1.73 million passengers boarded domestic flights every day in the United States. On a plane, individuals are confined in a tight env...
Source: Medgadget - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 35-year-old woman is evaluated for intermittent fever
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 35-year-old woman is evaluated for intermittent fever, sweats, fatigue, and dull midchest pain of 2 weeks’ duration. Medical history is significant for liver transplantation 6 months ago for primary biliary cirrhosis; she was seronegative for cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, and her donor was positive for both. Results of pretransplant testing for tuberculosis were negative. She received valganciclovir prophylaxis for 3 months after transplantation. Medications are tacrolimus, prednisone, ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Allergies & Immunology Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Overdiagnosis in IVF - how some IVF clinics increase work for themselves.
Lots of IVF doctors are very trigger happy, and make a diagnosis which is completely inaccurate. For example, they will do an ultrasound scan for a patient on the fifth or sixth day of the cycle and notice at that time that the follicles are small or the endometrium is thin , and then tell her, "Oh, your thin endometrium means that you most probably have endometrial tuberculosis, and you need investigation and treatment for this." This is plainly ridiculous ! On Day 6, most fertile women will have small follicles , because they haven't started growing yet , as a result of which their estrogen levels are goin...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - May 9, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: IVF diagnosis IVF misdiagnosis IVF overdiagnosis IVF tests Source Type: blogs

When philosophy and evidence collide: is an occupation-focused approach suitable in pain management?
I have often described myself as a renegade occupational therapist: I like statistics, I think experimental research is a good way to test hypotheses, I don’t make moccasins (though I occasionally wear them!), I’m happy reading research and figuring out how I can apply findings into my clinical practice. Occupational therapy is a profession that continues to evolve. The origins of occupational therapy lie back in the “moral” model of treatment for mental illness when advocates found that giving people things to do helped them become well (mind you, some of the reasons for admission to a “menta...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 6, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Occupational therapy Pain conditions Research Science in practice pain management Psychology rehabilitation research literature self management T Source Type: blogs

Dressing Up Tuberculosis: Carolyn A. Day ’ s Consumptive Chic by Sebastian Galbo
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 25, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Lucy Bruell Tags: Health Care A Different Take history of medicine Literature Arts and Medicine Blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

Tackling tuberculosis: local government's public health role
Local Government Association (LGA) - This publication looks to address questions that councillors and officers in local governmentmay have on tuberculosis, its burden in the UK and what action they and local governmentcan take to tackle tuberculosis. GuidanceSummary (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - April 9, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs