Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 24th 2020
In conclusion, taller body height at the entry to adulthood, supposed to be a marker of early-life environment, is associated with lower risk of dementia diagnosis later in life. The association persisted when adjusted for educational level and intelligence test scores in young adulthood, suggesting that height is not just acting as an indicator of cognitive reserve. A Comparison of Biological Age Measurement Approaches https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/a-comparison-of-biological-age-measurement-approaches/ Researchers here assess the performance of a range of approaches to measuring biological...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Epigenetic Profile of Werner Syndrome is Very Different from that of Aging
The research community has long used progeroid syndromes such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and Werner syndrome as tools in the investigation of aging. This category of conditions are colloquially thought of as accelerated aging, but are in fact only a little similar to aging. The various underling genetic causes of progeria result in accelerated accumulation of cellular damage of various sorts, different in each case, leading to tissue dysfunction and outcomes that resemble a range of normal age-related conditions. Aging is itself a process of damage accumulation, so it isn't surprising to find some degree of si...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 4th 2019
In this study, we hypothesized that moderately and chronically reducing ACh could attenuate the deleterious effects of aging on NMJs and skeletal muscles. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed NMJs and muscle fibers from heterozygous transgenic mice with reduced expression of the vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT), VKDHet mice, which present with approximately 30% less synaptic ACh compared to control mice. Because ACh is constitutively decreased in VKDHet, we first analyzed developing NMJs and muscle fibers. We found no obvious morphological or molecular differences between NMJs and muscle fibers of VKDHet and contro...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Senescent Cells in Blind Mole Rats do not Exhibit the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype
Naked mole-rats live as much as nine times longer than similarly sized rodent species. A short summary of what is known of their biochemistry is that they exhibit many of the molecular signs of aging found in other mammals, such as oxidative damage, presence of senescent cells, and so forth, but few to none of the consequences found in other mammals. Naked mole rats stay fit and healthy and physiologically youthful right up until very late life. The near relative species of blind mole-rat has many of the same characteristics, although it is less well studied than naked mole-rats at the present time. The accumulation...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 28th 2019
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

TET2 Regulates the Neuroinflammatory Response in Microglia
TET2 upregulation has been shown to improve neurogenesis and cognitive function in old mice. So it is interesting that researchers here link increased expression of TET2 with the inflammatory response of microglia in the brain. The broader context is that is becoming increasingly clear that dysfunctional and inflammatory microglia contribute significantly to the progression of neurodegenerative conditions. This is one of many examples of apparently contradictory results to illustrate the point that cellular biochemistry is very complex. Contradictions usually indicate that there is much left to be understood about the way ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 9th 2019
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity
Researchers here show that the fat tissue surrounding skeletal muscle that is observed in older and obese individuals contributes to declining muscle mass and strength. The most compelling evidence arises from transplantation of fat tissue between mice, showing that it produces harmful effects. The researchers further suggest that cellular senescence is an important factor in this process, which dovetails nicely with what is known of the way in which excess visceral fat tissue accelerates aging. The presence of larger than usual amounts of visceral fat increases the number of lingering senescent cells in the body, and sene...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 5, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 22nd 2019
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Infection-Senescence Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease
With the continued failure of clinical trials of therapies for Alzheimer's disease, largely immunotherapies, that aim to clear amyloid-β, a growing faction of researchers are rejecting the amyloid hypothesis. In that mainstream view of the condition, the accumulation of amyloid-β causes the early stages of Alzheimer's, but in addition to disrupting the function of neurons, it also causes immune cells in the brain to become inflammatory, dysfunctional, and senescent. This in turn sets the stage for the aggregation of tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles, which causes widespread cell death and the much more sev...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 26th 2018
This study is the culmination of a decade of research that has repeatedly demonstrated that this vaccine can effectively and safely target in animal models what we think may cause Alzheimer's disease. I believe we're getting close to testing this therapy in people." Although earlier research established that antibodies significantly reduce amyloid buildup in the brain, researchers needed to find a safe way to introduce them into the body. A vaccine developed elsewhere showed promise in the early 2000s, but when tested in humans, it caused brain swelling in some patients. The new idea was to start with DNA codin...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Ssk Upregulation Extends Improves Intestinal Function and Extends Life in Flies
In this study, we show that Snakeskin (Ssk), an sSJ-specific protein, plays an important role in controlling the density and composition of the gut microbiota and that upregulation of Ssk during aging can prolong Drosophila lifespan. More specifically, loss of intestinal Ssk in adults leads to rapid-onset intestinal barrier dysfunction, changes in gut morphology, altered expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and microbial dysbiosis. Critically, we show that these phenotypes, including intestinal barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis, can be reversed upon restored Ssk expression. Consistent with a critical role fo...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 4th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Commentary on Senolytic Gene Therapies to Target p16 Overexpression
This short commentary discusses the utility of Oisin Biotechnologies' initial strategy for destroying senescent cells, which is to use p16 expression as the determining sign of senescence. Oisin's implementation involves delivering dormant DNA machinery indiscriminately to all cells, and then triggering it only in cells with high levels of p16. This particular implementation is one of many possibilities in the gene therapy space, and thus various other groups are working on their own p16-based approaches as senolytic development as a treatment for aging grows in funding and popularity. It isn't just senescence and a...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 28, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Rutland Osprey Project
A vast drinking water reservoir in the English county of Rutland, about half way between Peterborough and the home of the pork pie, Melton Mowbray, is home to the first Western Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) to breed in England for 150 years. A translocation programme means that these raptors are now breeding at Rutland Water having been settled there, migrated (naturally) to Africa (Senegal, the tracking devices show) and then returned in the spring. In paying the birds a visit, we made the mistake of heading to the Wildlife Trust’s Rutland Water Nature Reserve in Egleton, near Oakham, paying our money (to a...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 26th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

TET2 Overexpression Enhances Neurogenesis and Cognitive Function in Old Mice
Heterochronic parabiosis is the process of linking the circulatory systems of an old and young animal. It improves measures of aging in the older individual, and worsens measures of aging in the younger individual. Researchers use this technique to try to pinpoint the important signaling and other cell behavior changes that take place with advancing age. This isn't just a matter of looking at signals in the bloodstream, however. Researchers can analyze any of the changing gene expression patterns and biochemical relationships inside cells, as they respond to the altered environment. That is the case in the open access pape...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 23, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 20th 2017
This study cohort is a healthy subset of the EpiPath cohort, excluding all participants with acute or chronic diseases. With a mediation analysis we examined whether CMV titers may account for immunosenescence observed in ELA. In this study, we have shown that ELA is associated with higher levels of T cell senescence in healthy participants. Not only did we find a higher number of senescent cells (CD57+), these cells also expressed higher levels of CD57, a cell surface marker for senescence, and were more cytotoxic in ELA compared to controls. Control participants with high CMV titers showed a higher number of senes...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 19, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Why is Sepsis a Condition of the Elderly?
Sepsis and consequent septic shock occur more frequently in the old and cause greater harm and mortality in older individuals. The condition occurs when an infection spurs the immune system into a state of runaway inflammation and then shutdown, sufficient to disrupt or permanently damage metabolism and organ function. The open access paper here dives into the details of age-related immune system dysfunction, with an eye to explaining why exactly these failures cause sepsis to be both worse and more prevalent in the elderly. As for so many of the specific frailties of old age, the best solution is to repair the immune syst...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 13, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 25th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

An Introduction to DAF-16 and FOXO in the Context of Aging and Longevity
In the early 1990s Cynthia Kenyon and others produced the first C. elegans nematode worms to exhibit significantly extended longevity through a single gene mutation, in daf-2, the nematode version of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor, and went on to map the relevant nearby biochemical landscape of these mutants. It is perhaps overly simplistic to mark this as the dividing line between a research mainstream whose members believed aging to be an intractably complex process, and a research mainstream increasingly interested in slowing aging through adjustment of metabolism, but that is the story as it is commo...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Comparing Gene Expression Profiles of Mammalian Species in Order to Search for the Determinants of Longevity
In this study, we examined the transcriptomes and metabolomes of primary skin fibroblasts across 16 species of mammals, to identify the molecular patterns associated with species longevity. We report that the genes involved in DNA repair and glucose metabolism were up-regulated in the longer-lived species, whereas proteolysis and protein translocation activities were suppressed. The longer-lived species also had lower levels of lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine and higher levels of amino acids; and the latter finding was validated in an independent dataset of bird and primate fibroblasts. Li...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 28, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Catalytic Asymmetric Csp3 −H Functionalization under Photoredox Conditions by Radical Translocation and Stereocontrolled Alkene Addition - Wang - 2016 - Angewandte Chemie International Edition - Wiley Online Library
Catalytic Asymmetric Csp3 −H Functionalization under Photoredox Conditions by Radical Translocation and Stereocontrolled Alkene Addition - Wang - 2016 - Angewandte Chemie International Edition - Wiley Online Library (Source: Organometallic Current)
Source: Organometallic Current - September 27, 2016 Category: Chemistry Tags: Photoredox Catalysis Sp3 Functionalization Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 12th 2016
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 11, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

First Published Paper for the SENS Research Foundation Mitochondria Team
For most of the past decade the SENS Research Foundation has helped to fund work by various groups on allotopic expression of mitochondrial genes, a way to both cure mitochondrial disease and, more importantly, prevent mitochondrial DNA damage from contributing to the aging process. Allotopic expression works by creating backup copies of important mitochondrial genes in the cell nucleus, altered such that the resulting proteins can make their way back to the mitochondria where they are needed. Some of that work gave rise to Gensight in France, where researchers are commercializing the ability to move one of these genes int...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 6, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

More to science: working as an Assistant Dean for Basic Science
How did you get interested in science? As far back as I can remember, biology, math, and music were my favorite subjects in school. I guess I was always very analytical, so science and math came pretty easy to me. I grew up in North Dakota and went to a very small school, so unfortunately I didn’t get to participate in science fairs as a kid. I think the reason I ended up in science was really due to the process of elimination. I didn’t think I was talented enough to go into music, and I didn’t particularly want to teach, which is what I thought you’d have to do if you went into math, so science it ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - February 25, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Dana Berry Tags: Biology Health Medicine #moretoscience careers early career researchers PhD Science > Careers science administration Source Type: blogs

Investigating the Mechanisms by which 7-Ketocholesterol Contributes to Age-Related Macular Degeneration
In this study, we hypothesize that the age-related deposition of 7KCh is related to subretinal microglial recruitment and activation that in turn contributes to progression to neovascular AMD. We evaluated the specific effects that 7KCh exerts on retinal microglial physiology and explored the notion that 7KCh induces pathogenic microglial changes. Our findings described here indicate that 7KCh acts as a chemoattractant capable of inducing the translocation of retinal microglia to the subretinal space. Once there, uptake of 7KCh by microglia can increase microglial activation, M1 polarization, and expression of angiogenic f...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 22, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An Introduction to the Redox Theory of Aging
There are a lot of theories of aging. Simply outlining the numerous categories of theory and offering a few comments as to which of the better known theories are currently well supported, dead, or disputed is a fairly detailed undertaking. It is hard to avoid delving into the history of the field when explaining how the research community ended up where it is today in terms of the various camps. There are evolutionary theories that seek to explain how aging came about, there are damage accumulation theories of aging, programmed aging theories that see aging as an evolved program of individual self-destruction, and any numb...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 13, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Corynebacterium glutamicum
Andreas Burkovski (Erlangen, Germany) presents a new publication on Corynebacterium glutamicum Written by a team of prominent scientists and containing practical information and state-of-the-art science. Essential handbook for everyone working with Corynebacterium and related organisms read more ... Corynebacterium glutamicum: From Systems Biology to Biotechnological Applications (2015) A comprehensive overview of C. glutamicum systems biology and biotechnological applications including: proteomics; flux analysis technology; metabolic engineering; manipulation of nitrogen metabolism; transport, degradation and assimilation...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - February 25, 2015 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Lysosomal Dysfunction in Atherosclerosis
Atherosclerosis is the build up of fatty plaques known as atheromas in blood vessel walls, leading to death or injury when blood vessels suffer structural failure or part of a plaque breaks loose to block a blood vessel elsewhere. Plaques start because damaged lipids cause a reaction in blood vessel walls, drawing in the immune cells called macrophages that ingest the lipids to remove them. Sometimes this doesn't work well enough, and the immune cells become stressed by intake of too many lipids and die. Plaques are comprised of the remnants of cells, and the presence of all this waste material causes further inflammation,...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 25, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Lasker Award Recognizes Question-Driven Research on Protein Folding
We congratulate long-time NIGMS grantee Peter Walter of the University of California, San Francisco, on being recognized with the 2014 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award  for his elegant and insightful work on the signal that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). He shares the honor with Kazutoshi Mori of Kyoto University in Japan. For more than 30 years, we have funded the Walter lab to investigate how yeast cells control the quality of their proteins and organelles to maintain homeostasis. In the 1990s, at the time Walter was conducting the research that led to this award, we supported his stud...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - September 10, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Monique Hall Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Rare Cancer are Subsets of Common Cancers
In June, 2014, my book, entitled Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs: Keys to Understanding and Treating the Common Diseases was published by Elsevier. The book builds the argument that our best chance of curing the common diseases will come from studying and curing the rare diseases. One of the key ideas developed in the book is that each common diseases is actually an aggregate of cellular processes that are present, individually, in rare diseases. In the case of the common cancers, we can find specific rare diseases that are subsets of the common diseases. Here is an excerpt from Chapter 8: 8.3.3 Inherited syndromes that cau...
Source: Specified Life - July 9, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: cancer syndromes carcinogenesis common cancers common disease familial cancer syndromes genetic disease orphan disease orphan drugs rare cancers rare disease Source Type: blogs

Point Taken: Finger Dislocations
Finger dislocations are relatively simple to identify and treat, but ligament and volar plate ruptures are often missed. Radiographs are not always indicated, but are useful in locating the area of injury and noting avulsion fractures. It is important to listen to the patient’s story to identify the mechanism by which the injury occurred because mimicking this mechanism is typically the best way to relocate the joint. Patients typically do not always need local anesthesia or digital block because relocation techniques are quick and can often be done while simply distracting the patient for a second or two. Treatment ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - January 3, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Asymmetric Synthesis of the Aminocyclitol Pactamycin, a Universal Translocation Inhibitor
JacsAsymmetric Synthesis of the Aminocyclitol Pactamycin, a Universal Translocation InhibitorRobert J. Sharpe, Justin T. Malinowski, and Jeffrey S. Johnson (Source: Organometallic Current)
Source: Organometallic Current - November 25, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Total synthesis Source Type: blogs

Chromosomal studies of the fetus after a miscarriage are a waste of money
A miscarriage is a heartbreaking event and the one thing the patient wants to know is – Why did the miscarriage happen ? Did I do something wrong ? And what can we do to prevent this from happening again ? This is one of the reasons why a lot of doctors will send the fetus ( products of conception, POC) for genetic testing – either FISH or karyotyping or CGH. These are expensive tests, and I think many doctors do this as a knee jerk reflex – doctors like doing tests in order to make a diagnosis , and because patients demand answers . ( Some do it because they make a lot of money by ordering the test !)...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - November 8, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Source Type: blogs

Manipulating Mitochondrial Maintenance via NAD+
All sorts of maintenance processes operate in various parts of the cell. An important location is within the swarming herd of mitochondria, as damage there appears to be a significant cause of degenerative aging. Some forms of mitochondrial damage can evade the evolved means of repair and recycling, leading to dysfunctional mitochondria and dysfunctional cells that export harmful reactive compounds out into surround tissues. Can this process be slowed by boosting the operation of natural maintenance mechanisms, however? Arguably this is what happens in many of the methods demonstrated to extend life and slow aging in labor...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 25, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

My turn to do lab meeting
I've been so absorbed in my Useful Genetics course that I've let our weekly lab meetings lapse over the last few months.  But I've set up a new schedule and today it's my turn to present.  Of course I haven't done any experiments lately, but I've done one tiny analysis and I'll also talk about plans for the CIHR proposal. The tiny analysis was the first step in addressing a question I've been wondering about for a while now- the phylogenetic distribution of the rec2/comEC gene.  In H. influenzae the  Rec2 protein sits in the inner membrane and translocates a single strand of DNA from the periplasm to t...
Source: RRResearch - July 19, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Rosie Redfield Source Type: blogs

Industry, Academic, Foundation and Government Alliances Continue in Early 2013
As promised, we are continuing to provide coverage of newly announced or recently discovered collaborations between industry, academia, and other entities to highlight the importance of such relationships in furthering medical progress and improving patient care.    Michael J. Fox Foundation and Parkinson’s A recent opinion article published in Nature Medicine discussed how “Money without collaboration won’t bring cures.”  The piece, written by Todd B. Sherer, chief executive officer of The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, maintained that “It's up to st...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 15, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Bacterial Toxins
Thomas Proft presents a new book on Bacterial Toxins: Genetics, Cellular Biology and Practical Applications This timely volume serves as an update on the most important recent advances in the genetics, cellular biology and practical applications of the most important bacterial toxins. Written by internationally respected scientists from eight different countries, topics reviewed include: the molecular basis and risk factors for verotoxin pathogenesis; molecular mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori CagA translocation and function; structure and mechanisms of action of pore-forming toxins; bacterial enterotoxins as immunomodula...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - January 25, 2013 Category: Microbiology Tags: Microbiology publications Bacteriology publications Molecular Biology publications Source Type: blogs

USMLE Questions – Characteristic Disease Findings
The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) is designed to emphasize knowledge of clinical scenarios and clinical pearls, even on Step I. Listed below are some commonly encountered disease findings and characteristics. Feature Disease 45, X chromosome Turner’s syndrome 5-HIAA increased in urine Carcinoid syndrome Aganglionic rectum Hirschsrpung’s disease Apple-core sign on barium enema Colon cancer Arched back (opisthotonos) Tetanus Argyll-Robertson pupil Syphilis Ash leaf on forehead Tuberous sclerosis Auer rods  Acute myelogenous leukemia Austin Flint murmur Aortic r...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 18, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Surgpedia USMLE diseases findings VMA water hammer pulse Source Type: blogs