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Photo Of Husband Supporting Wife With Cancer Has The Internet Weeping
This viral photo of a husband supporting his wife during her cancer treatment is a reminder of what marriage is really about.  On April 14, Mackenna Newman, 17, tweeted a photo of her dad Jon posted up outside his wife Marci’s bedroom, writing, “My mom has to stay in her room in isolation for her cancer radiation so my dad set up a desk at her door to keep her company and I’m crying.” My mom has to stay in her room in isolation for her cancer radiation so my dad set up a desk at her door to keep her company and I'm crying pic.twitter.com/rucH9HfDvk— kenna (@mackenna_newman) Apri...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: Voice box prostheses may only last three months
(Reuters) – Tracheoesophageal voice prosthetic devices often last less than 3 months before they need to be replaced, which is a shorter lifespan than previously reported, according to a new study. “In an ideal setting, voice prostheses should last at least six months and even more ideally, up to one year,” said lead author Jan S. Lewin of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. “In reality, they generally last somewhere about three months before they have to be replaced.” The silicone devices are placed in the shared wall between the trachea and the esophagus after ...
Source: Mass Device - October 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Clinical Trials Implants Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Source Type: news

Research into fly development provides insights into blood vessel formation
Researchers working with flies describe that the concentration of some small intracellular organelles determines the branching capacity of tracheal cells. Tracheal cells are analogous to the cells that form blood vessels in the human body. The inhibition or stimulation of new blood vessels has implications in cancer and in tissue regeneration. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kenya: Ten Million Kenyans At Risk of Lung Cancer
[Nation] Nearly 10 million Kenyan non-smokers are exposed to second-hand tobacco putting them at risk of lung, bronchittis and trachea cancers . (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Duke cancer care in Wake County
Treatment Terms Cancer Anal cancer Bile duct cancer Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Esophageal cancer Gallbladder cancer Kidney cancer Liver cancer Lung cancer Oral cancer Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Rectal cancer Skin cancers Skull base tumor Spine cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat and voice box cancer Thyroid cancer Tracheal cancer Uterine cancer Vaginal cancer and vulvar cancer Additional SEO Keywords cancer imaging and treatment in Cary...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - May 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 Source Type: news

Cigarette Smoke Can Make Your Pet Sick
Most adults who smoke recognize that second- and third-hand smoke is harmful to other people around them, especially children. But not as many smokers realize their habit can also damage their pet's health. Animals can develop lung damage and certain kinds of cancer just like humans do when exposed to second-hand smoke, residual chemicals from cigarettes, and even the hands and clothing of a smoker. According to veterinary oncologist Heather Wilson-Robles of Texas A&M University, in an interview with Medical Daily: "Animals with asthma or bronchitis may have difficulties controlling their disease. A lot of vets, e...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

12 Amazing Things We Learned About The Human Body In 2015
The human body is a source of mystery. But every year, scientists get just a little better at understanding its secrets.  Of course, 2015 has been no different. In the past year, researchers have created better access to proven therapies, developed futuristic new technologies that may change the way we approach disease and even enacted more complete disease screening processes to keep us healthy.  Read on to learn more. Here’s to more scientific discoveries in 2016!   @media (max-width: 969px) { #desktop { display: none; } } @media (min-width: 970px) { #mobile { display: none; } } #g-body-de...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

On Death and Dying: Know Your Status
Her name is Beatrice, an 86-year-old patient on the oncology ward at my hospital. I am standing over her body, hands on her chest, rhythmically moving up and down to pump blood from her heart to the brain and the rest of her organs -- her ribs cracking beneath my weight with each downward push. At the head of the bed, an anesthesiologist is attempting to guide a breathing tube through the mouth and into the trachea to deliver air into her lungs. I look over and see blood coming up through the tube. Almost 4- minutes passes -- several rounds of chest compressions, electrical shocks to the heart, injections of different medi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HART targets artificial bronchus, esophagus for turnaround
Jim McGorry, CEO of Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology (NSDQ:HART), said he’s ready to right the ship at HART by expanding its regenerative trachea tech into both the bronchus and esophagus. McGorry has been the CEO of HART for 4 months, and told the Boston Business Journal he’s preparing to turn the company’s stock slide around. The reins were passed to McGorry from former CEO David Green earlier this year as the company said it was seeking a chief exec had the experience to guide the company through clinical trials and product launches. McGorry took over a slumping company &nd...
Source: Mass Device - November 12, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Regenerative Medicine Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology (HART) Source Type: news

Heart Attack vs. the California Stem Cell Program: Disease-a-week Challenge No. 20
"Hearts will never be practical, until they can be made unbreakable"--L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz It was nine-twenty on a recent Sunday morning, time to pick up Gloria. On Sundays she walks to Church, (she is Catholic; I am not) and after the service we hold hands and take a walk together. So I turned off the computer, trotted downstairs, out the door, up the street, turned right--and there was Gloria. She was too early. I usually had to wait outside the church ten or fifteen minutes, shifting foot to foot, reading my notes or-- was something wrong? The color was gone from her face. Midway through ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

6 Amazing 3D-Printed Body Parts That Changed Patients' Lives
There's been a lot of hype around 3D printing, but its applications in medicine are real. Advances in "additive manufacturing" -- the industrial version of 3D printing -- are being applied toward federally approved medical devices, and have enabled surgeons from Scotland to Chicago to inexpensively visualize medical procedures before performing them. But that's far from all: Doctors are also crafting personalized bones and joints for their patients.  The devices and materials used today in a medical context often go well beyond the plastic and resin prototypes commonly...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Asbestos Puts Shipbreaking Workers at Risk for Many Cancers
This study was one of the few that involved only "shipbreaking," which is the dismantling of old ships for salvage or scrap. It also examined cancers beyond mesothelioma, a cancer caused almost exclusively by inhalation or ingestion of asbestos. The study, published in the on-line medical journal PLOS One, was linked to the Taiwan Cancer Registry and involved 4,227 workers from the 1985 Kaohsiung Shipbreaking Workers Union who belonged to the Labor Insurance Program. They were followed until 2008. There were 940 deaths and 436 cancer cases reported. Their numbers were compared to a control group of 22,135 who wor...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 4, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

To heal the human instrument
When Erik Laurence transferred in 2009 to Shanghai, China, as vice president of a software company, he thought his biggest challenge would be improving his Mandarin-language skills and learning the nuances of the Chinese business scene. But his vocal cords, not the foreign nation, turned out to be his undoing. Laurence, who was in his mid-40s at the time, had struggled for about 20 years with a mild case of spasmodic dysphonia (SD), intermittently losing his voice at odd times. It’s a neurological disorder that involves spasms of the vocal cords, which cause the voice to break up or have a strained or strangled ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 21, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What Is the Trachea?
The trachea is a major airway in the respiratory system. Where is this airway located? (Source: About.com Lung Cancer)
Source: About.com Lung Cancer - June 4, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: lungcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

Cancer diagnosis can’t shake these first-time parents
In some ways, Katelyn Silva and Joe Lauzon are typical first-time parents. They bombard their newborn son Joey’s doctor with questions: Is it OK to give him Tylenol? Is he taking enough formula? Is green poop OK? And people they meet are sharing pictures of their son. The difference is that Katelyn and Joe are asking an oncologist, Suzanne Shusterman, MD, of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, their questions, and Joey’s baby pictures are x-rays and MRI exams shared among a team of physicians. Having a baby is tough “Having a baby is tough. Having a baby with cancer is...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 13, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: All posts Cancer childhood cancer Source Type: news

What is an Endotracheal Tube?
: An endotracheal tube is a flexible plastic tube that is placed through the mouth into the trachea (windpipe) (Source: About.com Lung Cancer)
Source: About.com Lung Cancer - February 21, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: lungcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

Harvard Researcher: Breakthrough Made In Organ Transplants
BOSTON (CBS) — A breakthrough has been made in organ transplants that uses the cells in the patient’s own body. David Green, Harvard Apparatus president, says so far the outcome has been positive. WBZ NewsRadio 1030′s Diane Stern reports play pause Potential Organ Transplant Breakthrough Diane Stern So far, trachea’s have been able to be regenerated in people who have been born with birth defects or have...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kckatzman Tags: Health Healthwatch Heard On WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Local Syndicated Local Watch Listen CBS Boston David Green Diane Stern Organ Donors Organ Transplants Source Type: news

Definition of Trachea
The trachea is a major airway in the respiratory system. Where is this airway located? (Source: About.com Lung Cancer)
Source: About.com Lung Cancer - July 11, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: lungcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Cell-Based Therapies
The world of stem cells We know the human body comprises many cell types (e.g., blood cells, skin cells, cervical cells), but we often forget to appreciate that all of these different cell types arose from a single cell—the fertilized egg. A host of sequential, awe-inspiring events occur between the fertilization of an egg and the formation of a new individual: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are also called totipotent cells. The first steps involve making more cells by simple cell division: one cell becomes two cells; two cells become four cells, etc. Each cell of early development is undifferentiated; that is, it is no...
Source: ActionBioscience - December 28, 2012 Category: Biology Authors: Ali Hochberg Source Type: news

Stem Cells for Cell-Based Therapies
The world of stem cells We know the human body comprises many cell types (e.g., blood cells, skin cells, cervical cells), but we often forget to appreciate that all of these different cell types arose from a single cell—the fertilized egg. A host of sequential, awe-inspiring events occur between the fertilization of an egg and the formation of a new individual: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are also called totipotent cells. The first steps involve making more cells by simple cell division: one cell becomes two cells; two cells become four cells, etc. Each cell of early development is undifferentiated; that is, it is...
Source: ActionBioscience - December 28, 2012 Category: Biology Authors: Ali Hochberg Source Type: news