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The environment can become a noninvasive therapeutic approach to bolster white matter health
(Children's National Health System) Those parents you overhear transforming trips to the grocery store into sensory adventures -- telling babies too young to babble that broccoli is GREEN, radishes are RED and tangerines are ORANGE -- are onto something. Being exposed to a complex and stimulating environment rich with new sights, sounds and a full vocabulary can play a powerful role in strengthening infants' developing brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Smart Is a Dog Really? The Secrets of a Canine Mind
Odds are you don’t look forward to spending time in a magnetic resonance imager–and with good reason. The clanging, coffin-like machine seems purpose-built for sensory assault. But you’re not Ninja, a 3-year-old pit-bull mix, who trots into a lab at Emory University in Atlanta, catches a glimpse of the MRI in which she’ll spend her morning and leaps happily onto the table. Ninja is one of the few dogs in the world that have been trained to sit utterly still in an MRI (the little bits of hot dog she gets as rewards help) so that neuroscientist Gregory Berns can peer into her brain as it works. &ldquo...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized animals Dogs Pets Source Type: news

Dopamine dressing – can you dress yourself happy?
The fashion world has bought into the idea that wearing La La Land yellow and head-to-toe colour will act as an antidote to these dark days. Now here comes the science part …So-calleddopamine dressing is everywhere this season. Based on the idea that wearing overtly fun clothes can help lift your mood in depressing times, it begs the question: can wearing “happy clothes” really make us more happy?The fashion industry is certainly trying to convince us that it can be done. The catwalks have been a Skittles packet of brights – fromFanta orange at Armani andscarlet at Maison Margiela toBeauty and the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ellie Violet Bramley Tags: Fashion La La Land Psychology Life and style Science Source Type: news

LSD study reveals why acid trips last so long
Research is first to demonstrate precisely how the compound lysergic acid diethylamide attaches to serotonin receptors in the brain“You can hear the Universal Symphony with God singing solo and Holy Ghost on drums,” was how Hunter S. Thompson described the experience, while the Beatles famously sang about “tangerine trees and marmalade skies”.Related:LSD's impact on the brain revealed in groundbreaking imagesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Drugs Neuroscience Biology Source Type: news

Massaging Your Brussels Sprouts Will Make Them Way Better. Really.
Brussels sprouts have the potential to be delicious, especially when roasted, sautéed or caramelized. These edible buds are rich in nutrients, including fiber and vitamin C, which makes us want to eat them all the more. But if you’ve ever tried eating them raw in a salad, you may have noticed they’re a little unpalatable ― they’re particularly tough to chew. It turns out the trick to some of the best Brussels sprouts of your life is the simple art of massage. via GIPHY Massaging your veggies?! Skeptics have a right to be wary, but they should also keep an open mi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cats and Kitchen Counters
According to one survey in which more than 1,000 veterinary professionals and 167 cat owners were asked if cats should be allowed to freely roam the kitchen counters. Without discussing what the kitty might be up to, whether to troll for food or survey the landscape, 21 percent viewed it favorably, 13 percent said they "rarely" allow it and 54.5 percent responded with a resounding "no." There was also an "other" option, which claimed 11.4 percent of the votes from veterinary professionals. Cat owners seemed somewhat more permissive than the veterinarians; 28 percent said their cats' counter s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Foods That Can Calm Anxiety And 3 That Don't.
dear Editor, I've included credits for all the photos above each point below the post and am hoping we can use this photo for the post itself and for social media sharing. Thank you! Anxiety has become so prevalent in today's world, it's now considered the norm rather than the unusual. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older, or 18% of the population. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health) While medication is a valid route, many of us choose to seek a mo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Soda Is Out, Seltzer Is In: 5 Better-for-You Bubblies
By Alex Orlov for Life by Daily Burn Love the joyous bubbles and sugary sweetness of diet cola? The calorie-free carbonation seems like a dieter's dream, but research shows that sugary colas can make your taste buds crave real sugar even more -- and even alter your brain chemicals. Yikes! Luckily, not all fizzy beverages get the same bad rap (unless, of course, you drink way too much of them). For people who can't resist the satisfying fizz on the tongue, there are plenty of other ways to satisfy that craving for an effervescent pick-me-up. From probiotic-rich tonics to flavored seltzers, these carbonated drinks might hel...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I’m the MOST racist! How groups give people extreme views | Dean Burnett
From Republican presidential candidates to hard-core Corbyn supporters, we’re used to hearing extreme views from all over the political spectrum and beyond. Why? As a British person with liberal leanings, the ongoing coverage of the US Republican race to select a presidential candidate is often baffling. Much of this is due to Donald Trump, of course. Donald Trump, the ungodly offspring of a retired golfer and a beligerent tangerine. Donald Trump, a man who once heard the word “unspeakable” and thought “challenge accepted!” Just when you think he couldn’t possibly be more openly offensiv...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 7, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Science Psychology Politics Donald Trump Media Science and scepticism Society Religion Race issues Source Type: news

The Healing Power of Gratitude
"You were given life; it is your duty (and also your entitlement as a human being) to find something beautiful within life, no matter how slight."--Elizabeth Gilbert Gratitude is perhaps the most important key to finding success and happiness in the modern day. Knowing what we appreciate in life means knowing who we are, what matters to us and what makes each day worthwhile. Paying attention to what we feel grateful for puts us in a positive frame of mind. It connects us to the world around us and to ourselves. Research demonstrates that focusing on what we are grateful for is a universally rewarding way to feel ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How oysters, spinach, and tangerines could be the secret to chiselled cheekbone
Frida Harju, nutritionist at health and fitness app Lifesum, advises incorporating food into your diet that is high in vitamins C and A and zinc to help boost skin and improve definition. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Become Who You Are: The World's First Legally Recognized Cyborg May Be Onto Something
Bodies are imperfect. Every combination of flesh, nerves, bones and blood has its particularities and limitations, some of which restrict the experience of its owner more severely than others. For issues that threaten our safety and survival, technology offers a helping hand. Glasses improve vision. Crutches, wheelchairs and prosthetics help with movement. For those with abnormal heart rhythms, there are pacemakers.  But what about the less dire limitations, for example, those that affect your aesthetic perception? How would your life be different if you couldn't see color, if the range of your vision was limited to v...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Number 6 Burns Like an Orange Flame
Say the number six and it sits at my temples, a serrated, moist tangerine sheen moving like fire. I prefer the number seven, pale turquoise and floating like a cottony cloud before my eyes. But my favorite has always been the number four, earthy, silent, smelling of mushrooms and cube-shaped. I can admit this now without self-consciousness. As a child I thought everyone perceived the world in this way. Until I realized they didn't. To avoid ridicule, I quickly learned to keep silent. The same silence recognized by some others of you reading this now. To me, numbers appear in color. Letters appear in c...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drugs Live: Cannabis on Trial - live blog
Join us for live action, discussion and debate during Channel 4’s TV experiment into the effects of cannabis, including hashish and skunk injested in a controlled environment Drugs Live: why I wanted to get stoned on TV‘Jon Snow’s negative experience on skunk is very understandable’ 11.42pm GMT Right. So there we have it. The main findings seemed to be that skunk users heard more voices where they weren’t present, that cannabis of any kind was associated with an increased desire to listen to music, and that performance on a memory task was impaired while intoxicated.Also, I’d really like...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 3, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Suzi Gage Tags: Drugs Cannabis Biology Human biology Source Type: news

5 Healthy Eating Habits To Adopt This Year
By Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD Nutrition is a hot topic these days, yet many of my clients still struggle with consistently following through with "the basics," and the stats show that missing the mark on many healthy habits is the norm. For example, the median daily intake of produce for U.S. adults is 1.1 servings of fruit and 1.6 servings of veggies, far below the minimum recommended five daily servings. If you're going to set just one goal for 2015, I think eating more produce should be it, but I've also listed four others below. I know you've heard them before, but they are without a doubt the most tried-and-tru...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wish I’d a hysterectomy years ago! – Sharon’s Story
At the age of 40 I was diagnosed with fibroids. A scan confirmed I had about 10 of them, the largest was almost the size of a rugby football, the others between the size of a tangerine and an orange. All of them subserosal so my uterus was quite deformed. As I had no intention of having children, the mistake I made was not opting to go for a hysterectomy immediately. Instead I thought I would try embolization, mainly because I was self employed and taking between 2 – 3 months off work was not cost effective for me, so a 2 week recovery post-embolization was a lot more appealing. I had it done – not a pleasant p...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - May 14, 2014 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Your Stories bilateral salpingo oophorectomy embolisation endometriosis fibroids laparascopic hysterectomy Source Type: news

29 Quick Remedies for Relieving Constipation After Hysterectomy
Towards the end of November last year I asked our Facebook ladies if they could share what they had used for relieving constipation after hysterectomy and I’d like to share there various answers here with you. This is not an exhaustive list, and it doesn’t mean that everything suggested here will work for everyone, but with a bit of trial and effort you should find a solution if you are having this problem. They are not in any particular order – just as I picked them up off Facebook. Colts foot rock. Get it at old fashioned sweet shops. Kiwi fruit smoothie, curries, fibre Punes and prune juice Over the c...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - January 15, 2014 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Hysterectomy Recovery constipation wind Source Type: news

Mangosteen's phytochemical components
Indonesia's "Queen of Fruits," Garcinia mangostana L., or purple mangosteen, is a popular superfood both in its natural form and as a botanical dietary supplement. The fruit of a tropical evergreen tree, mangosteen is about the size of a tangerine with white flesh that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The seductive charm of fMRI
Neuroimaging is widely regarded as the key to understanding everything we do, but the authors of a controversial new book, Brainwashed, claim this approach is misguided and dangerousYou've seen the headlines: This is your brain on love. Or God. Or envy. Or happiness. And they're reliably accompanied by pictures of colour-drenched brains – scans capturing Buddhist monks meditating, addicts craving cocaine, and students choosing Coke over Pepsi. The media – and even some neuroscientists, it seems – love to invoke the neural foundations of human behaviour to explain everything from the Bernie Madoff financia...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 29, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Psychology Biology UK criminal justice Health, mind and body Medical research Media Higher education Law Neuroscience Features Crime University teaching The Observer Medicine Science and nature Source Type: news

Eating naartjies in the bioscope: a little guide to South African English | Mind your language
The vocabulary and grammar of spoken South African English are coated in a fine layer of Afrikaans dust. It's been there so long that most of us no longer noticeThe first English lesson I ever gave was in a little language school in a sprawling Taiwanese city. The theme was Fruit, a subject about as straightforward as it gets for a native English speaker. Unless you're from South Africa.To prepare, I flipped through the previous teacher's handmade flashcards and consulted my English guidebook for the names of the "exotic" fruits found in Asia – apple-shaped Chinese pears and otherworldly dragon fruit. But w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Comment Blogposts guardian.co.uk Media Language South Africa Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Tangerine Sorbet — Recipes for Health
A light, refreshing sorbet that can be made with a number of different fruits. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - February 11, 2013 Category: Nutrition Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Cooking and Cookbooks Recipes Medicine and Health Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts Citrus Fruits Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Winter freeze keeps citrus growers up at night
Extreme cold is a threat to California's $1-billion lemon, orange, tangerine and grapefruit crop. The next few nights will be critical.It's edging toward midnight and John Gless is keeping a wary eye on the thermometer as he patrols his family's 450 acres of citrus orchards outside Hemet. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 13, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news