Improving the monitoring of ship emissions
(University of Oldenburg) A new EU-project aims at developing a sensor network to monitor ship emissions. A German-French team led by marine scientist Oliver Wurl of the University of Oldenburg, Germany, will develop a network of data bouys for autonomously measuring soot, oil, sulphur dioxide or plastic debris at the sea surface and in the air. Drones and devices deployed from aboard research vessels will supplement the system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UN Chief Warns of Deadly Germs as Potential Bioterrorist Weapons
Credit: United NationsBy Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Jul 8 2020 (IPS) The coronavirus—which has claimed the lives of over 538,000 people and infected more than 11.6 million worldwide—has destabilized virtually every facet of human life ever since its outbreak in late December. Providing a grim economic scenario of the devastation caused by the pandemic– including rising poverty, hunger and unemployment– UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned last week of the possibility of an even worse disaster: the risks of bioterrorist attacks deploying deadly germs. He said it has already shown some of the...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Thalif Deen Tags: Armed Conflicts Featured Global Global Geopolitics Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Katherine Johnson, NASA Mathematician Whose Work Inspired the Film Hidden Figures, Dies at 101
Katherine Johnson, a mathematician who calculated rocket trajectories and earth orbits for NASA’s early space missions and was later portrayed in the 2016 hit film “Hidden Figures,” about pioneering black female aerospace workers, has died. She was 101. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said on Twitter that she died Monday morning. No cause was given. Bridenstine tweeted that the NASA family “will never forget Katherine Johnson’s courage and the milestones we could not have reached without her. Her story and her grace continue to inspire the world.” The @NASA family will never forget ...
Source: TIME: Science - February 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: BEN FINLEY / AP Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime Space Source Type: news

Bayreuth researchers discover new arsenic compounds in rice fields
(Universit ä t Bayreuth) University of Bayreuth researchers, together with scientists from Italy and China, have for the first time sys-tematically investigated under which conditions, and to what extent, sulphur-containing arsenic com-pounds are formed in rice-growing soils. In the journal " Nature Geoscience " the scientists present their re-sults and identify the urgent need for research with a view to protecting consumers from health risks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ghana: Reducing Air Pollution in Accra
[Ghanaian Times] Air pollution is a type of environmental pollution that affects the air and is usually caused by smoke or other harmful gases, mainly oxides of carbon, sulphur and nitrogen. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 11, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Unique data confirms why water turns brown
(Lund University) By analysing almost daily water samples taken from the same river from 1940 until today, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have confirmed their hypothesis that the browning of lakes is primarily due to the increase in coniferous forests, as well as rainfall and sulphur deposits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ground-breaking Clean Air Protocol to Guard Human Health and the Planet, Enters into Force
Credit: Bigstock.By External SourceUNITED NATIONS, Oct 5 2019 (IPS) European and North American countries will take a major stride in cleaning up the atmosphere next Monday, 7 October, through the implementation of an amended legally binding treaty to limit the amount of emissions polluting the air. With 18 countries and the European Union now having ratified the amended treaty, from a total of 51 who have signed, including many of the countries which are part of the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the official entry into force marks an important step to curb pollut...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Environment Europe Global Headlines Health North America Source Type: news

Babies exposed to air pollution have greater risk of death - study
Infant mortality rate higher in babies exposed to pollutants such as sulphur dioxideBabies living in areas with high levels of air pollution have a greater risk of death than those surrounded by cleaner air, a study has found.It is not the first study to investigate the link between air pollution and infant mortality , but thestudydrew particular focus on different pollutants and its analysis at different points in babies ’ lives.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: UK news Science Infant and child mortality Health Society Air pollution Environment Cardiff University Pregnancy Parents and parenting Source Type: news

Country diary: a dowdy female with the vapours gets male moths a-flutter
Langstone, Hampshire: Potential mates can detect the emergence of an adult vapourer moth from miles awayIt was impossible to miss therusty tussock moth (Orgyia antiqua) caterpillar foraging on my raspberry bush. Its body was dotted with orangey-red pinacula, wart-like growths sprouting clusters of pale lemon hairs. It had two bristly black antler-like protrusions at the front of its head, and a tail-like projection from its rear. Along its back four sulphur-yellow dorsal tufts stood proud, like the bristles of an interdental toothbrush. Measuring it at 25mm in length, I could tell it was a female, as males reach a maximum ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Claire Stares Tags: Insects Wildlife Gardens Environment Animals Biology Science Source Type: news

How the Apollo Program Changed Our Understanding of What the Moon Even Is
As the ancient planet Theia struck its glancing blow into Tellus, the planet that would become Earth, part of its mantle sloughed off into that of the planet it had struck, but some drove on past, pushing a layer of Tellurian mantle ahead of it like mud on the blade of a bulldozer. Still traveling with more than half of Theia’s original speed, blade and burden rose together back out into space. Much fell back. Much did not. Some escaped completely to form a short-lived ring around the Sun. But a lot stayed in orbit around the wrecked, reforming planet below. It was from that fiery orbital aftermath that the Moon was ...
Source: TIME: Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Morton Tags: Uncategorized apollo1150 space Source Type: news

Scientists discover Snowball the cockatoo has 14 distinct dance moves – video
A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology are back with evidence that Snowball is not limited in his dance moves. Despite a lack of dance training, videos show, Snowball responds to music with diverse and spontaneous movements using various parts of his bodyContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Animals Science Source Type: news

Scientists discover Snowball the cockatoo has 16 distinct dance moves – video
A sulphur-crested cockatoo named Snowball garnered YouTube fame and headlines a decade ago for his uncanny ability to dance to the beat of the Backstreet Boys. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology are back with evidence that Snowball is not limited in his dance moves. Despite a lack of dance training, videos show, Snowball responds to music with diverse and spontaneous movements using various parts of his bodyContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Animals Science Source Type: news

Cockatoo choreographs his own dance moves, researchers believe
New study of Snowball the prancing parrot points to bird at peak of his creative powersBlock-rocking beaks: Snowball ’s moves reviewed by our dance criticWhen Snowball the sulphur-crested cockatoo revealed his first dance moves a decade ago he became an instant sensation. The foot-tapping, head-bobbing bird boogied his way on to TV talkshows and commercials and won an impressive internet audience.Related:Block-rocking beaks: Snowball the cockatoo – reviewed by our dance criticContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Animal behaviour Science Birds Animals World news Source Type: news

Graphene sponge helps lithium sulphur batteries reach new potential
(Chalmers University of Technology) To meet the demands of an electric future, new battery technologies will be essential. One option is lithium sulfur batteries, which offer a theoretical energy density more than five times that of lithium ion batteries. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently unveiled a promising breakthrough for this type of battery, using a catholyte with the help of a graphene sponge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 29, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A novel environmental-friendly and safe unpacking powder without magnesium, aluminum and sulphur for fireworks - Han Z, Jiang Q, Du Z, Huey Hoon H, Yu Y, Zhang Y, Li G, Sun Y.
A novel environmental-friendly unpacking powder for fireworks which has no sulfur, no magnesium, no aluminum or their alloys has been prepared in this study: potassium perchlorate (75%), potassium hydrogen terephthalate (13%), micronano porous silicon (9%)... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Radical plan to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe, study finds
Experts worry that injecting sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere could put some regions at riskA new study contradicts fears that using solargeoengineering to fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm patterns in some parts of the world.Related:Geoengineering may be used to combat global warming, experts sayContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Holden in Washington Tags: Geoengineering Environment Climate change US news Science Source Type: news

Radical proposal to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe, new study claims
Experts worry that injecting sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere could put some regions at riskA new study contradicts fears that using solargeoengineering to fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm patterns in some parts of the world.Related:Geoengineering may be used to combat global warming, experts sayContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Holden in Washington Tags: Geoengineering Environment Climate change US news Science Source Type: news

A cause of possible genetic problems in mitochondria is revealed
(University of Seville) The loss of mitochondrial information and of mitochondria gives rise to defective cell metabolism. As well as the lack of capacity to generate the energy necessary for the cells, the loss of mitochondrial information can generate an increase in oxygen free radicals that attack and damage the genetic material or produce Iron-Sulphur protein deficiencies. All this brings about incorrect cell functioning and eventually cell death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Screening for volatile sulphur compounds in a fatal accident case - Xiang P, Qiang H, Shen B, Shen M.
Acute fatal poisoning due to the inhalation of toxic gas frequently occurs in China. Volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) are toxic to humans. In fatal poisoning investigations, such as those in industrial settings, a number of VSCs, including methanethiol (M... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Impact of air pollution on depression and suicide - G ładka A, Rymaszewska J, Zatoński T.
Air pollution is one of the greatest public health threats worldwide. All substances appearing in excessive quantities in the atmosphere, such as particulate matter, nitrogen oxides or sulphur oxides may be its ingredients. Depending on their size and natu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Sulfur mustard-related ocular complications: a review of proteomic alterations and pathways involved - Panahi Y, Shahbazi A, Naderi M, Jadidi K, Sahebkar A.
Sulphur mustard (SM; (2, 2'-dichloroethylsulfide)) was used for the first time in 1917, during the World War I. SM mainly induces DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This compound injures the respiratory system, eyes, skin and the endocrine, ga... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Hawaii ’s Erupting Volcano Looks Even Crazier From Space at Night
A stunning image released by NASA shows what Kilauea, the volcano in Hawaii that has been erupting for three weeks, looks like from space. As the photo shows, Kilauea is not only visible from space — you can also see the lava spewing out of the volcano. Seven instruments aboard NASA ‘s International Space Station and partner satellites have been detecting active fissures, fires, ash and sulphur dioxide plume as well as the height and composition of volcanic plumes, a NASA release explains. “One of the first things emergency responders wanted to know was where the lava was coming out, where are all the fis...
Source: TIME: Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized hawaii onetime Source Type: news

Researchers create super sponge that mops up oil spills
Australian scientists say new polymer can remove crude oil and diesel from seawater•Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noonOil spills could be soaked up by a new floating substance that combines waste from the petroleum industry and cooking oil,according to new research led by South Australia ’s Flinders University. The new polymer, made from sulphur and canola cooking oil, acted like a sponge to remove crude oil and diesel from seawater, according to a new study published in the Advanced Sustainable Systems journal. The polymer can be squeezed to remove the oil and then reused.Continue...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Adam Morton Tags: Oil Environment Oil spills Australia news South Australia Science Source Type: news

Ships in the English Channel have highest rate of sulphur violations in northern Europe
(Chalmers University of Technology) Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have shown that between 87 and 98 percent of ships comply with the tougher regulations for sulphur emissions that were introduced in northern Europe in 2015. The lowest levels of compliance were observed in the western part of the English Channel and in the middle of the Baltic Sea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Iraq ’s Toxic Conflict
By Will HigginbothamUNITED NATIONS, Feb 2 2018 (IPS)In Iraq, thirty years of armed conflict has killed hundreds of thousands of people, wounded countless more, displaced millions and laid cities and towns to waste. Amongst all of this death and destruction, there is an often-overlooked victim whose harm has far reaching consequences: The environment.Whilst Iraq’s environment has suffered from degradation due to conflict for decades, in recent years it has been exacerbated due to the so-called Islamic State (ISIS).“Wherever ISIS has been there has been huge environmental destruction and with that have come poten...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Will Higginbotham Tags: Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Environment Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Women's Health Source Type: news

Lawmakers Put Medical Skills to Work After Train Crash
CROZET, Va. (AP) — Republican members of Congress with medical experience put their skills to work after a train carrying dozens of them crashed into a garbage truck in rural Virginia, killing one person in the truck and injuring others. The lawmakers were on their way to a strategy retreat in the countryside when the collision occurred around 11:20 a.m. Wednesday in Crozet, about 125 miles (200 kilometers) southwest of Washington. No serious injuries were reported aboard the chartered Amtrak train, which set out from the nation's capital with lawmakers, family members and staff for the luxury Greenbrier resort in W...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alan Fram and Heidi Brown, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Sulphur Mustard (Mustard Gas): Incident Management
United Kingdom Department of Health. 11/23/2017 This 13-page document provides information about how to respond to a chemical incident involving sulphur mustard, also known as mustard gas. It discusses Physicochemical Properties, Published Emergency Response Guidelines, and Health Effects. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Maybe the healthiest wine in the world
When I was in South Africa last year, I met a revolutionary winemaker… His wine was completely organic. It had no toxins, and it contained powerful antioxidant properties. It was infused with a local herb called rooibos, also known as “red bush.” You may have seen rooibos tea on supermarket shelves. I immediately knew this wine should be made widely available in America — and I’m still hopeful a distributor will bring it here. I enjoy a nice glass of red wine from time to time, but the trouble with most of the wines sold in America is that they’re loaded with dangerous chemicals. Winema...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - December 7, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health additives natural organic Sulfites wine Source Type: news

Substrate exfoliation carves an opening for kesterite photovoltaics
Sulphur incorporation followed by a neat exfoliation process enhances the voltage of kesterite solar cells and gives them the potential to power the Internet of Things (Source: Nanotechweb.org News)
Source: Nanotechweb.org News - November 16, 2017 Category: Nanotechnology Authors: Robert Westbrook Source Type: news

Louisiana boy delivers brother when mom went into labor
Jayden Fontenot delivered his baby brother Daxx after his mom Ashly Moreau unexpectedly went into labor August 11 at his home in Sulphur, Louisiana. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Reducing harmful emissions from diesel locomotives
The EU-funded ENSPIRIT project is developing an innovative emission abatement system capable of reducing nitrogen oxide (NOx) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) pollution levels and meeting stringent new regulations on particle matter. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - August 18, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Warning on the world's most common pesticide
Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley found that spraying with elemental sulphur raises the risk of asthma and breathing problems in children living near fields. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Promising Drug Reduces Growth of Aggressive Mesothelioma
Scientists in Italy have found a platinum-based drug that successfully lessens growth of the most aggressive type of mesothelioma cancer cells. Researchers at the University of Salento discovered the experimental drug Ptac2S was more effective in reducing the spread of sarcomatoid malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in mice compared to cisplatin — the most widely used chemotherapy drug for treating mesothelioma. Sarcomatoid is the least common of the three mesothelioma cell types but is considered more aggressive and harder to treat. A diagnosis with the sarcomatoid cell type is typically associated with a poor pro...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 7, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Alimta alternatives to cisplatin Antonella Muscella Biphasic mesothelioma chemotherapy for mesothelioma chemotherapy resistance DNA adducts epithelioid mesothelioma genomic activities mesothelioma clinical trials mesothelioma survival Source Type: news

How Poop Can Be Worth $9.5 Billion
Let’s get two nasty numbers out of the way first (and don’t say you haven’t wondered about these at least once): The human race produces about 640 billion lbs. (290 billion kg) of feces per year, and about 3.5 billion gal. (1.98 billion liters) of urine. Divide by 7 billion if you’d like to get your own annual contribution to this heaping helping of yuck. From the moment human beings shambled out of the state of nature, the problem has always been just what to do about all that biological refuse. In the developed world, the answer is familiar: Flush it away as fast as possible and try not to think a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized crops Disease energy Environment fertilizer health Pollution recycling waste Source Type: news

Sulfur Hexafluoride Use in DMEK Safe to 3 YearsSulfur Hexafluoride Use in DMEK Safe to 3 Years
Use of 20% sulphur hexafluoride for tamponade instead of 100% air in Descemet's membrane endothelial keratoplasty led to similar patient outcomes but fewer graft detachments. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines - October 9, 2015 Category: Opthalmology Tags: Ophthalmology News Source Type: news

Asteroid that killed dinosaurs also intensified volcanic eruptions - study
Research on the Deccan Traps in India reveals massive rise in lava flows around time of impact of Mexico’s Chicxulub crater 65m years ago, increasing the catastrophe for ecosystemsThe asteroid that slammed into Earth and heralded the doom of the dinosaurs triggered a surge in volcanic eruptions that made the catastrophe even worse, researchers claim.Scientists analysed prehistoric lava flows in India and found that soon after the massive impact, volcanic eruptions became twice as intense, throwing out a deadly cocktail of sulphur dioxide and carbon dioxide. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Dinosaurs Science Asteroids Volcanoes Evolution Natural disasters and extreme weather Space World news Biology Source Type: news

Opportunity to host Native Voices traveling exhibition
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is proud to announce a partnership with the American Library Association (ALA) through which ALA’s Public Programs Office will manage a national tour of a traveling adaptation of Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, to America’s libraries and other Native-serving cultural institutions beginning in 2016. Four copies of the traveling exhibition will tour nationally for four years to dozens of sites around the country. The four year national tour of Native Voices has been publicly announced (for 2016-2020), and the ALA is welcoming proposals. A...
Source: Dragonfly - October 2, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Catherine Burroughs Tags: News From NN/LM PNR Source Type: news

No evidence 'cocktail of everyday chemicals' causes cancer
ConclusionThis systematic review has identified 85 chemicals found in the environment that have the potential to affect different stages in the development of cancer. The researchers say this is intended as a starting point, so that future research can look at what effect these chemicals may have when there is exposure to more than one. This is a new approach to understanding the risk that various chemicals may have.The study did not find that these chemicals cause cancer, but that they have the potential to make changes to cells, which would then create particular characteristics of cancer, such as increased uncontrolled ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

Earth's Mysteriously Light Core Brims With Sulphur
New research from the European Association of Geochemistry indicates that the Earth's core contains large deposits of sulphur, estimated to be upwards of 8.5 x 1018 tonnes. Published in the Geochemical Perspectives Letters in June 2015, this estimation far surpasses the current amount of sulphur on the Earth's surface and based on recent estimations, is around 10 percent of the Moon's mass. This is the first time geologists have found any conclusive data for sulphur in the Earth's core, adding more support to the theory that the Moon was formed from a collision between a young Earth and a large planet-sized object. Con...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 23, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Massive Eruption Of Japan's Mount Shindake Volcano Caught On Camera
Japanese residents fled the remote southern island of Kuchinoerabu on Friday following the eruption of Mount Shindake -- and the spectacular eruption was captured on video. Mount Shindake spewed black clouds as high as 5.6 miles into the sky as authorities evacuated nearly 140 people from the island, with one man reportedly suffering minor burns but all others believed to be safe. Video captured by the Japan Meteorological Agency and published by the Japanese public broadcaster NHK shows the initial explosion mushrooming into a towering cloud of ash. Watch the full video, above. "There was a really loud, 'dong' s...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Comparison of dietary macro and micro nutrient intake between iranian patients with long-term complications of sulphur mustard poisoning and healthy subjects - -Mood MB, Zilaee M, -Mobarhan MG, Sheikh-Andalibi MS, Mohades-Ardabili H, Dehghani H, Ferns G.
BACKGROUND: Patients with long-term complications of sulfur mustard (SM) poisoning are often less able to undertake optimum levels of physical activity and adequately control their dietary intake. The aim of present study was to investigate the dietary int... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - April 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Can volcanoes tackle climate change?
Two hundred years ago a volcanic eruption cooled the Earth. Could it help us tackle global warming today?The island of Sumbawa in what is now Indonesia began to crack apart 200 years ago this week. On 10 April 1815, an explosion that could be heard a thousand miles away announced the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history. Mount Tambora, once among the highest peaks in the East Indies, was blown in half. Thousands in the immediate vicinity were killed by lava, wind, ash, fire and tsunamis, but the volcano’s effects echoed far further and longer. The force of the explosion catapulted mi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Jack Stilgoe Tags: Books Culture Volcanoes Natural disasters and extreme weather World news Geoengineering Climate change Environment Source Type: news

Study finds link between air pollution and stroke risk
Conclusion This study showed a clear link between rises in gas and particle pollution and the chances of being admitted to hospital or dying because of a stroke. The researchers showed the link was strongest on the day of exposure to raised pollution levels. But this study has some limitations. While systematic reviews are a good way to summarise all the research that has been published on a topic, they are only as good as the individual studies they include. About two-thirds of the studies used a time series design, which the researchers say is less effective in taking account of trends such as the season of year, rathe...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Neurology Source Type: news

Studies reveal smog connected to death, anxiety and hospital admissions
Exposure to air pollution increases the risk of dying from stroke - with a new review revealing a link with short-term exposure to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

India Air Pollution Cutting 660 Million Lives Short By 3 Years
NEW DELHI (AP) — India's filthy air is cutting 660 million lives short by about three years, according to research published Saturday that underlines the hidden costs of the country's heavy reliance on fossil fuels to power its economic growth with little regard for the environment. While New Delhi last year earned the dubious title of being the world's most polluted city, India's air pollution problem is extensive, with 13 Indian cities now on the World Health Organization's list of the 20 most polluted. That nationwide pollution burden is estimated to be costing more than half of India's population at...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Checkpoint kinase 1 is activated and promotes cell survival after exposure to sulphur mustard - Jowsey PA, Blain PG.
Sulphur mustard (SM) is a vesicating agent that has been used several times as a weapon during military conflict and continues to pose a threat as an agent of warfare/terrorism. After exposure, SM exerts both acute and delayed long-term toxic effects princ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - December 6, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Geoengineering could prevent climate effects caused by giant volcanic eruptions
Shooting huge amounts of non-ozone-harming greenhouse gases into the atmosphere could counteract vast volcanic sulphur clouds that cause perpetual winters, new research suggests Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 6, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Tags: Geoengineering Environment Volcanoes Climate change Science Source Type: news

What Does A Comet Smell Like? Rosetta Probe Reveals This Space Rock Frickin' Stinks
Mix the aroma of rotten eggs with a whiff of horse stables, throw in a hint of ammonia and formaldehyde, and viola! You've got eau de Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Scientists at the University of Bern in Switzerland recently discovered the comet's pungent scent by analyzing a mixture of molecules detected in the comet's coma, the cloud of particles and gases around the space rock's nucleus. The molecules were collected by an instrument aboard the Rosetta spacecraft, which has been flying in tandem with the comet. The instrument, called ROSINA, consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. (Story continues...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 26, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Copper Sulfate (Bluestone): Uses and Remedies
Copper Sulphate is a widely used chemical compound comprised of Copper, Sulphur and Oxygen whose formula is CuSO4. Crystals of Copper Sulphate are often bright blue and the substance was known once as Blue Vitriol or Bluestone. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - September 10, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Home Remedies Source Type: news

Air pollution linked to irregular heartbeat and lung blood clots
Conclusion This was a large national study that looked in detail at links between people's short-term exposure to air pollutants and national records on hospital admissions for heart attack, emergency admissions for all cardiovascular problems, and deaths from cardiovascular disease. The study had some limitations – for example, as the authors say, it did not include heart attacks that took place before hospital admission. It also used fixed monitoring sites, which may not accurately reflect personal exposure to air pollution.  For the public, the results of this study are probably confusing. That's because th...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news