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Straightening the eyes doesn't rebalance the brain - Zhou J, Wang Y, Feng L, Wang J, Hess RF.
In this study, we asked two questions: (1) Does realigning the eyes by stra... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Emilia Clarke Just Went Full Daenerys Targaryen for Season 8 of Game of Thrones
The final season of Game of Thrones may not be slated to air until 2019, but Emilia Clarke is clearly ready to get back to scorching her enemies as the Mother of Dragons. In true Daenerys Targaryen style, the 30-year-old actor shared an Instagram Tuesday showing off her freshly dyed platinum blonde locks. “I done did it,” she captioned the selfie. “Mother of dragons meet Emilia. Emilia meet mother of dragons. If you squint just so you might never know. All hail to the magnificence of @kevalexanderhair and @candicebanks74 the genius creators of ‘KHALEESI WIG’ (and not forgetting all the hair on...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized celebrities Daenerys Targaryen emilia clarke game of thrones Television TV Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 15, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Acera Surgical and Telos Medical’s partnership to Xtant Medical’s 510(k) clearance, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. Acera Surgical partners with Telos Medical for Restrata wound matrix trial Telos Partners announced in a Sept. 14 press release that Acera Surgical has chosen Telos to lead its Restrata wound matrix study. The study will surgery the clinical outcomes of Restrata treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and test for effectiveness and safety. Restrata is a fully synthetic wound matrix that is FDA-cleared for ...
Source: Mass Device - September 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Business/Financial News Clinical Trials Dental Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Surgical Acera Surgical Contego Medical Fresenius MedTech OBP Medical Pinnacle Sciences Plusoptix Telos Source Type: news

Infants with congenital Zika virus syndrome suffer serious visual impairment
(Elsevier) There is a broad collection of anomalies now known as congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). Some of the most serious are ophthalmologic. Two papers published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS) evaluated visual function among infants with suspected and confirmed CZS. Both studies found that while about 40 percent of patients had ocular abnormalities, 100 percent of children tested had visual impairment. Thus, cortical visual impairment might be the most common cause of blindness among children with CZS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

See What the Solar Eclipse Looked Like From NYC
A solar eclipse that started in Oregon and moved eastward before ending in South Carolina was visible in every part of the U.S. on Monday. The rare phenomenon brought skygazers out to places like Wyoming, Idaho and Missouri — states that were in the eclipse’s path of totality. In New York City, viewers got a partial view of the eclipse, and gathered in the city’s public parks and sidewalks to catch the moon-covered sun. The solar eclipse marked the first time since 1979 that an eclipse was visible in the contiguous U.S. From Times Square to the Empire State Building, New York’s landmarks filled with...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - August 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized eclipse onetime space 2017 Source Type: news

The True Meaning of the Great American Eclipse
Despite all the hype, the moon has nothing special planned for Aug. 21. It will continue doing what it’s done for more than 4 billion years—insensibly circling Earth, a dead rock at the end of a long gravitational tether. The sun has nothing special planned either. It will sit where it must sit and burn as it must burn to sustain the flock of planets and moons and asteroids and comets that have orbited it for so long. That’s how things go in the clockwork cosmos, and yet once in a while, there’s poetry in the machinery. Once in a while, the wheels click in synchrony and the indifferent universe offe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized eclipse space space 2017 Source Type: news

Karamoja ’s Mothers and Children Reap the Benefits of Health Systems Investments
June 22, 2017A remote region of Uganda sees dramatic improvements in health services and outcomes.Jane Atim smiles and smooths the skirt of her crisp blue uniform as she ushers us into the maternity ward, excited to share what the night brought.Morning light warms the walls of the room where Veronica Munges, 19, swaddles her healthy six-pound baby —a boy, named Tatelo. Jane shows Veronica, a first-time mother, how to breastfeed before turning to the two other women who gave birth overnight—Clara, 37, and Paulina, 34. The first day of life is the riskiest of all for infants and mothers, especially here in U...
Source: IntraHealth International - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: lfreeze Source Type: news

Ask the expert: What is the best way to correct my child ’s crossed eye?
Dr. David Hunter is experienced in using traditional strabismus surgery and Botox injection to correct a child’s crossed eye. If you see that your child’s eye has become crossed, or he or she complains of having double vision, you may be struggling to find clear answers about what caused this to happen and the best way to get your child’s eyes working together again. When the sudden onset of an inward-turning crossed eye doesn’t respond to glasses and isn’t associated with other systemic or structural disease, it’s known as acute comitant esotropia. This condition is quite rare...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kat J. McAlpine Tags: Ask the Expert Research and Innovation Botox Dr. David Hunter esotropia strabismus Source Type: news

Double take: The special approach that corrected one child ’s vision overnight
Dr. David Hunter is a pioneer in detecting and treating children’s eye conditions with a range of new and tried-and-true technologies and techniques. “At school I was seeing double today, Mom,” said 9-year-old Eliza in May of 2015. Catherine hadn’t noticed her daughter’s eyes crossing and suspected that her fourth grader was simply tired. A few weeks later, however, Catherine and her husband were sitting in the front row at Eliza’s chorus concert, when suddenly they both noticed their daughter’s eye was crossed. It was Eliza’s 10th birthday. “She was fine one ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 5, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kat J. McAlpine Tags: Caregivers Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation david hunter Department of Ophthalmology lazy eye minimally invasive surgery strabismus Source Type: news

What Causes Uveitis?
Discussion Inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, or uvea, is termed uveitis. Uveitis can be divided into anterior, intermediate or posterior uveitis by involving the anterior (iris and ciliary body), intermediate (vitreous) or posterior (choroid and usually retina) compartments. Panuveitis involves all 3 compartments. Duration can also be used to classify uveitis. Acute is 6 weeks and> 3 months is chronic persistent uveitis. Episodic periods of inactivity and reactivity that last more than 3 months are called recurrent uveitis. A third way to characterize uveitis is if it is granulomatous or not. Uveitis increase...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 3, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Retinopathy of prematurity: New developments are cause for hope
(Elsevier Health Sciences) A mini-symposium published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS) provides important insights into new techniques and treatments that show promise for eliminating retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) throughout the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Public Speaking? There’s An App For That
This article first appeared on QuietRev.com According to the 2015 Chapman University Survey of American Fears, the top three personal anxieties that make us lose sleep are (1) reptiles, (2) public speaking, and (3) heights. There’s not much Quiet Revolution can do about scary snakes and dizzying drop-offs, but when it comes to glossophobia, we are here to help with a selection of apps that focus on the different facets of making a presentation. So, clip on that wireless mike, and be heard! Before the curtain rises If you need to sedate the butterflies in your stomach prior to making a presentation, Public Speaki...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Child With Strabismus Who Squints One Eye The Child With Strabismus Who Squints One Eye
What is the cause of this child's inability to use his eyes together?Medscape Ophthalmology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ophthalmology Case Challenge Source Type: news

Why glasses can create a vision for Baltimore
Imagine if you are an eight-year old who needs glasses but doesn ’t know it. You squint to read the board. Sometimes, if you’re sitting too far back, you can’t see the board at all. Tasks that seem simple to other students, like reading a short story or understanding a map, are frustrating and almost impossible. According to estimates from the Baltimore Ci ty Health Department and Johns Hopkins University, as many as 10,000 elementary and middle school students in the city lack the glasses they… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 23, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dr. Leana Wen Source Type: news

Do you have more trouble reading websites these days? It's not just you
Do you ever squint at your smartphone, or have trouble reading text on a website? It's not just you. As CBC Radio technology columnist Dan Misener explains, parts of the web really are getting harder to read. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Technology & Science Source Type: news

FDA relabels RebiScan Pediatric Vision Scanner as Class II device
The FDA today said it reclassified RebiScan’s handheld Pediatric Vision Scanner device as a class II device. RebiScan’s flagship Pediatric Vision Scanner won FDA de novo clearance in June, with indications for screening young children for amblyopia and strabismus. Boston-based RebiScan put in a request to classify the Pediatric Vision Scanner as a class II device in December, 2013, according to the FDA. The agency issued an order classifying the device in Class II on June 8, according to the release, and laid out its special controls for the device, which has been labeled under a generic name as a strabismus de...
Source: Mass Device - September 23, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Optical/Ophthalmic Regulatory/Compliance RebiScan Source Type: news

Federal Register: Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of Strabismus Detection Device
The FDA is classifying the strabismus detection device into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the strabismus detection device's cla... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - September 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Even With Insurance, Less Affluent Kids Miss Out on Eye Care Even With Insurance, Less Affluent Kids Miss Out on Eye Care
Middle- and lower-income children don't visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, such as strabismus (misaligned eyes) and amblyopia (lazy eye), U.S. researchers say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Low-income kids less likely to receive strabismus diagnoses
Back to school eye exams may not be the norm for all kids. A large study shows strabismus is diagnosed much less in poor communities which puts kids at risk for permanent vision loss. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

One mom ’s insights: Navigating care for children with behavior differences
Diba Jalalzadeh, now 12, paces energetically around the waiting room. She has been coming to Boston Children’s Hospital since she was a baby. She sees plastic surgeon Dr. John Mulliken for her craniofacial condition, known as Crouzon syndrome. But he’s just one of her many doctors. Diba is followed by Dr. Linda Dagi (Ophthalmology), Dr. Bonnie Padwa (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Dr. Mark Proctor (Neurosurgery), Dr. David Coulter (Neurology), Dr. Laurie Ohlms (Otolaryngology) Dr. John Emans (Orthopedic Surgery), Dr. Carolyn Bridgemohan (Developmental Medicine), Dr. Dascha Weir (Gastroenterology and Nutrition...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 17, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Parenting autism Autism Spectrum Center child life Crouzon syndrome Dr. Bonnie Padwa Dr. Carolyn Bridgemohan Dr. Dascha Weir Dr. David Coulter Dr. John Emans Dr. Laurie Ohlms Dr. Linda Dagi Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Roger Breitbart Source Type: news

Low-income kids less likely to receive strabismus diagnoses
(University of Michigan Health System) Back to school eye exams may not be the norm for all kids. A large study by Kellogg Eye Center shows strabismus is diagnosed much less in poor communities which puts kids at risk for permanent vision loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Steroid treatment in very low birth weight infants may contribute to vision problems
(Elsevier Health Sciences) It has long been suspected that steroids may have negative neurodevelopmental effects on very premature infants. In a study in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, researchers found that for very premature infants with birth weights of less than 500 grams, there was a 1.6 times increased risk for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and a 1.7 times greater chance for advanced ROP. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What Medical Problems Can Patients with Turner Syndrome Have?
Discussion Turner Syndrome (TS) is one of the most common genetic disorders in females. It was first described by Dr. Henry H. Turner in 1938. It affects 1 in 2000-2500 births and ~70,000 girls and women have TS in the United States. It is caused by the absence of all or part of the second X chromosome. The most common variation is 45X which affects about 50% of TS patients and usually has the most complications, but there are other variations. Phenotypes vary and therefore the age of diagnosis varies. Mean age of diagnosis unfortunately is 15 years. Diagnosis is made by chromosomal analysis. Haploinsufficiency of the SHOX...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 15, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The long hike: A pediatric vision scanner ’s journey to market
As a pediatric ophthalmologist, I do my best to assure that every young patient I examine will have a lifetime of perfect sight. The condition that I battle most commonly is amblyopia, or “lazy eye,” in which the eye is healthy but does not develop vision — simply because the brain doesn’t receive proper input when a child’s visual system is “learning” how to see. When I can diagnose amblyopia early enough, I can treat it with an eye patch or eye drops to block the “good” eye, giving the eye with amblyopia time to catch up. But amblyopia does not fight fairly: abo...
Source: Mass Device - August 9, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Pediatric ophthalmology
Childhood glaucomaEye movement disordersEye cancerOptic nerve disorders We use the latest advances in pediatric ophthalmology to optimize your child ’s vision and eye health.Diagnosis and treatment of pediatric eye diseasesPrompt identification of childhood eye and vision problems is often the best way to preserve or regain vision.   This applies to common pediatric eye conditions such as refractive error requiring eyeglasses, amblyopia (or lazy eye) and strabismus (eyes that are not straight), as well as serious eye conditions such as childhood cataract, glaucoma, retinopathy of prematurity, and an eye tumor c...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - August 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Federal Register: Controlling the Progression of Myopia: Contact Lenses and Future Medical Devices; Public Workshop
The FDA, in cosponsorship with the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), American Academy of Optometry (AAOpt), American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS), American Optometric Association (AOA), American Society of Catar... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - July 11, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Public Workshop – Controlling the Progression of Myopia: Contact Lenses and Future Medical Devices, September 30, 2016
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), American Academy of Optometry (AAOpt), American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS), American Optometric Association (AOA), American Society of... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - July 11, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

We Have A 'Force Field' Around Our Bodies And Here's How You Can Feel It
You know what your personal space is. Uninvited strangers invading it invoke an immediate sense of unease. A bird flying over but too close to your head may cause you to reflexively duck. It’s like we don’t just end where our bodies end, but a little bit beyond. Now researchers have figured out a way to make you "feel" the invisible bubble that wraps around you. In a new study published in the journal Cognition on June 24, neuroscientists at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm describe how they did this using an altered version of the so-called rubber hand illusion. In the classic version of t...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fixing Lazy Eye: It’s Not Too Late for Adults
CHICAGO. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Doctors call it strabismus, but most of us know it as lazy eye or wandering eye. Special glasses, eye patches and exercises are used to train the eyes to stay straight. But very few patients realize there’s a surgery that can permanently fix misaligned eyes in adults. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - June 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heroin Is the Russian Roulette of Our Generation
(Photography: Kamelia Ani) Below is the speech Cook delivered to Morris Knolls High School in New Jersey. New Jersey is just one state of many where the heroin epidemic just isn't letting up. It is reported two people a day, on average, are overdosing. This, as well as her other efforts to combat the heroin epidemic and help families cope with addiction, will be featured in an upcoming PBS Documentary. Heroin sucks. It really, really does. It sucks not just in the "man, that sucks" way but also in the literal way. It sucks the happiness out of homes. It sucks the trust out of relationships. It sucks the dreams f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Smartphone Diagnoses: Evaluating eye misalignment through smartphone pictures
New smartphone-based diagnostic tools are enabling consumers to take their temperatures, diagnose simple skin conditions and much more. As advanced smartphone imaging puts more and more capabilities in patients’ hands, it’s no surprise that clinicians and numerous digital health startups are leveraging them. As a case in point, the Department of Ophthalmology and the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) at Boston Children’s Hospital have co-developed a smartphone application for patients with  strabismus, or misalignment of the eyes, to securely capture and transmit photos of their eyes...
Source: Mass Device - May 11, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Planning for Easter With Alzheimer's
The last actual Easter dinner I had with my mother was so long ago I actually can't remember it. What I can remember about Easter is that it was always a big deal in our house and my mom typically made a ham with all the fixings including mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, jelly, breads, and this weird green jello salad mix that my brothers like. Easter was once a big to-do that sometimes started the week before with a sunrise service and progressed into a day filled with laughter and a large table that sat roughly 12. For many Americans, this Easter will be their first with a loved one who has recently found out or reveale...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Child With StrabismusA Child With Strabismus
What is the cause of this boy's ptosis and impaired eye movement? Medscape Ophthalmology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ophthalmology Case Challenge Source Type: news

Amblyopia, not strabismus, identified as key contributor to slow reading in school-age children
(Elsevier Health Sciences) Children with amblyopia, commonly known as 'lazy eye,' may have impaired ocular motor function. This can result in difficulties in activities for which sequential eye movements are important, such as reading. A new study conducted at the Retina Foundation of the Southwest determined that children with amblyopia read more slowly than children with normal vision or with strabismus alone. Their findings are published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Girl, 5, to have her eye REMOVED and put back in place by surgeons to fix squint
Chloe Strudwick, from Ifield, West Sussex, has a squint which leaves her seeing everything as 2D rather than 3D. Doctors believe surgery to remove her eye and shorten the muscles will cure it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Strabismus: Eye Position Instability Seen in Both EyesStrabismus: Eye Position Instability Seen in Both Eyes
Video eye trackers show variation in both the fixating and following eyes in strabismus in the absence of a common target. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ophthalmology News Source Type: news

Seeing Dark Matter as the Key to the Universe -- And Human Empathy
On the last day of my residence at the artists' colony Yaddo, I shared with my co-residents an excerpt from my book, Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs. I read from the first chapter, in which I liken dark matter -- matter present throughout the universe that is invisible to us because it doesn't emit or absorb light -- to other entities that remain unnoticed but influence the workings of the world, from the bacterial cells in our bodies, which outnumber human cells by a factor of 10, to the myriad Internet communities and subcultures that thrive outside our awareness. The goal was to illuminate the gap between our limited obse...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Volk Eye Check camera that spots a squint before it's too late
Paul, 50, from North London, has a squint (when the eyeballs do not follow each other because the muscles around them do not work in synchronicity). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First patient receives new treatment for AMD
Breakthrough in trial to cure blindnessRelated items from OnMedicaAge-Related Macular DegenerationWarning of big rise in age-related blindnessGene therapy hope for those born with inherited blindnessGP referral rates may partly explain national variation in squint surgeryLatanoprost eye drop for glaucoma more than halves vision loss (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 29, 2015 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Glimpsing The Virtual Reality Future Of How We Treat Eye Problems
Quartz: An entrepreneur is using virtual-reality headsets to try to cure vision disorders Virtual reality is already being touted as a useful tool in the treatment of veterans with PTSD and children with autism, but one San Francisco entrepreneur believes the still-nascent technology could also hold the key to a cure for common visual disorders.  Through his company, Vivid Vision, James Blaha ultimately plans to offer VR vision therapy gaming software for those who suffer from strabismus (more commonly known as “crossed” eyes) or amblyopia ( a “lazy” eye), both of which result in limited...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These Macro Photos Reveal The Awesome Diversity Of Human Eyes
It sees. It cries. It helps us communicate. Yes, the human eye is one outstanding organ. But what do you see when you look into someone’s eyes? Most of us focus on their color. But give a really close look and you’ll see at once that our irises (that’s the colored part) come in countless shades and patterns. What’s more, you’ll observe that eyes differ in ways beyond color--from their size and shape to the appearance of the lids to the color and fullness of the lashes. And, of course, our eyes are constantly changing. We open them wide. We squint. We look left. We look right. Up. Down. In dark...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 24, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Here’s Why Email Puts You in a Nasty Mood
Your alarm goes off, you roll over, grab your phone, and flicker your eyes open. You squint in the glow of the blue and it begins: You’re scrolling through notifications, emails, texts. It’s already been shown that emailing after business hours can be psychologically damaging, but new research published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology confirms what you probably know in your gut to be true: workers who are expected to be available even when they aren’t at work experience an elevated stress response. Psychologists from the University of Hamburg asked 132 people from 13 workplaces to complet...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - August 7, 2015 Category: Science Authors: tanyabasutime Tags: Uncategorized cortisol Email human behavior Mental Health/Psychology mood neuroscience Smartphones Stress technology Workplace & Careers Source Type: news

This Is Why Horrific Surgical Mistakes Still Happen In The U.S.
By: Laura Geggel Published: June 11, 2015 04:41pm ET on LiveScience. Major errors during surgery are rare, but preventable mistakes still happen in hospitals throughout the United States, a new review finds. In about 1 in 100,000 surgeries, doctors make a "wrong site" error — for example, they operate on the wrong side of a person's body, or sometimes even on the wrong person, the study found. And in 1 out of every 10,000 procedures, doctors leave something (such as a medical sponge) in the patient's body, the researchers found. Poor communication among medical staff is the root cause of many of the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 15, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fruit flies’ sexual behavior as a model of motivation in the brain
By Nancy Fliesler If you have children present, you might want to click out of this post. But if you want to understand motivation, you’ll want to know about the sexual behavior of fruit flies. In the brain, motivational states are nature’s way of matching our behaviors to our needs and priorities. But motivation can go awry, and dysfunction of the brain’s motivation machinery may well underlie addiction and mood disorders, says Michael Crickmore, PhD, a researcher in the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center. “Basically, every behavior or mood disorder is a disorder of motivation,” he say...
Source: Mass Device - June 8, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Big Data Blog Boston Children's Hospital Vector Blog Source Type: news

Good eyes but poor vision: An indistinct world for one in 20
Extremely poor vision can be caused by strabismus in early childhood or by a displaced optical axis. Amblyopia is caused not by organic damage to the eyes but by the brain incorrectly fitting together the images the eyes provide. As a result, the ability to see an object in sharp focus is severely limited. This occurs in more than one in 20 people, researchers report. The authors' study analyzed the visual acuity of over 3200 German individuals aged between 35 and 44 years and determined the frequency and causes of amblyopia. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Perceptual-motor computational model of anomalous binocular correspondence - Schor C.
PURPOSE: A head-centric disparity model of anomalous binocular correspondence (ABC) in strabismus provides a framework that captures several associated perceptual-motor characteristics that are unexplained by the retino-centric model (anomalous retinal cor... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Why does squinting help us see more clearly? Video reveals how changing the shape of your eye corrects blurry vision
Craig Benzine from Chicago tackled the issue in a video for Mental Floss. Some people squint (stock image shown) to see more clearly. It helps by changing the eye's shape and limiting light entering. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers develop new computer-based vision screening test for young children
(Elsevier Health Sciences) Many eye disorders in young children are asymptomatic and may remain undetected without testing. Since effective treatments are available for many of those conditions, early identification and intervention are critical to prevent potentially permanent vision problems. A new report published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus describes the effectiveness of a new computer-based vision-screening test, the Jaeb Visual Acuity Screener, which is suitable for use in schools and pediatrician's offices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Hubble telescope at 25: When will Hubble II launch?
Twenty-five years ago this Friday, Nasa launched the Hubble space telescope. Within weeks, the American space agency realised that it had put the instrument into the Earth's orbit with the telescopic equivalent of a squint. It was one of the most embarrassing and expensive technological cock-ups in history. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - April 21, 2015 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

2 Simple Maps That Reveal How American Agriculture Actually Works
Driving through the farmlands of Iowa looking for fresh food to eat is a lot like sailing through the ocean looking for fresh water to drink. In the ocean, you're surrounded by water that you can't drink; in Iowa, you're surrounded by food you can't eat. Even though Iowa generates the second-highest amount of revenue of any state off its crops -- $17 billion in 2012 -- the overwhelming majority of that comes from field corn, which is destined mostly for animal feed and ethanol, not dinner plates. I came upon this startling fact while trying to answer a seemingly simple question: What crop generates the most money in each...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news