Cancer
I sometimes like to open my posts with a joke. But not this time. There isn ' t a joke for this.Mrs. Dalai has cancer.How ' s that for a kick in the ass? I am neither vain nor arrogant enough to think that I could write the ultimate treatise on dealing with a loved one ' s cancer. There are any number of engaging stories out there on Caring Bridge and the like. You don ' t want to read a tear-jerker anyway, nor do you want to endure every last boring and/or gory detail. Mrs. Dalai would be very upset with me if I shared all that. Hell, she ' s probably going to be upset with me for writing this at all. She is a very p...
Source: Dalai's PACS Blog - September 4, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: blogs

No spleen? What you need to know to stay healthy
Due to injury or necessary surgery (splenectomy), some people are lacking a spleen, the organ that filters the bloodstream and helps the body fight infection. You do not need your spleen to live a normal, healthy life. However, since the spleen performs some important tasks, people who do not have one are urged to take certain precautions. What is a spleen? The spleen is a fist-sized organ that sits under your rib cage on the left side of your abdomen. Unlike the stomach, liver, or kidneys, it is not directly connected to the other organs in your abdomen. Instead, the spleen is connected to your blood vessels, with an arte...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elise Merchant, MD Tags: Health Infectious diseases Managing your health care Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs

40-something male in a head-on Motor Vehicle Collision and Splenic Injury
A 40-something male presents to the stabilization room for evaluation following head on motor vehicle collision (MVC).  Pt was reported restrained driver, hit at city speeds,  with + airbag deployment.The MVC was unquestionably caused by the other car, not by this driver.The patient complained to EMS of chest pain and a prehospital EKG en route was concerning for STEMI.The patient was at all times hemodynamically stable, without evidence of any profuse bleeding.He had an ECG recorded on arrival to the ED:Anterior and Inferior STEMI with diffuse hyperacute T-waves. This ECG really can ' t be anything else.&nb...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - October 26, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Critical Care Compendium update
LITFL’s Critical Care Compendium is a comprehensive collection of pages concisely covering the core topics and controversies of critical care. Currently there are almost 1,500 entries with more in the works… Some pages are more developed than others, and all the pages are being constantly revised and improved. Links to new references and online resources are added daily, with an emphasis on those that are free and open access (FOAM!). These pages originated from the FCICM exam study notes created by Dr Jeremy Fernando in 2011, and have been updated, modified and added to since. As such will be particularly us...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 17, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Critical Care Compendium Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured CCC LITFL collection Source Type: blogs

Help with medical terminology!!
by foville1859 (Posted Sat Sep 07, 2013 7:27 pm)You can compile lists of prefixes and suffixes which always have the same meaning within medical terminology-cyte = a kind of cell (example: monocyte)-otomy = cutting a hole (example: craniotomy) -ectomy = cutting out something from the body (example: splenectomy) -itis = inflammatory condition (example: tonsillitis) -gram = radiology image (example: mammogram)Root words in medicine are very often from Latin and Greek etymologies, helps to have some background in those languages There must already be lists of common medical prefixes and suffixes, maybe you can collect lists...
Source: Med Student Guide - September 7, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Case 250
Welcome to Case 250!  Here is a challenging case (in a little more detail than normal) to commemorate this milestone post:A 90-year-old male from Missouri presented with a 3-day history of fever and dyspnea. His medical history included hypertension and splenectomy due to injury. He lived with his wife and reported no recent travel, pet or known tick exposure. On admission, he was febrile (temperature 40˚C) and hypotensive (105/58). Laboratory values of note were elevated leukocytes (13,100 cells/mL; 58% neutrophils), decreased hemoglobin (9.5 g/dL), low platelet count (106,000 cells/mL), increase liver fun...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 17, 2013 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs