Poorer countries suffer most from global health crises, we need help to handle coronavirus | Dr Claude Posala
Pacific nations, still reeling from a devastating measles outbreak, have watched news out of Wuhan in panicAs Pacific Islanders watched updates about the coronavirus outbreak over the past few weeks, unease soon gave way to panic.Still reeling in shock from ameasles outbreak in Samoa, Pacific Islanders ’ fears were stoked as it became apparent that even large, well-developed countries were struggling to contain the outbreak. Low-resourced settings always suffer the greatest losses in global medical crises and people living in these island nations are not blind to that detail.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Dr Claude Posala Tags: Pacific islands Solomon Islands Asia Pacific World news Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

The virtues of strangers? Policing gender violence in Pacific Island countries - Bull M, George N, Curth-Bibb J.
This article considers the gap between reformist policy and practice in the policing of gender violence in Pacific Island Countries (PICs) with a key focus on Solomon Islands, Fiji and Kiribati. In doing so, we critically engage with two pervasive argument... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Health and Climate Change: Country Profile 2019: Small Island Developing States Initiative: Solomon Islands
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 12/2019. This 16-page health and climate change country profile for the Solomon Islands, developed with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), provides a summary of available evidence on climate hazards, health vulnerabilities, health impacts, and progress to date in the health sector ’s efforts to realize a climate-resilient health system. Health risks related to climate change of considerable concern to the Solomon Islands include vector-borne diseases, respiratory diseases, waterborne and food-borne diseases, malnutrition, and noncom...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Barriers to disability-inclusive disaster management in the Solomon Islands: perspectives of people with disability - King J, Edwards N, Watling H, Hair S.
There is growing emphasis on disability-inclusive disaster management within key international guidance on disaster management. Yet, people with disability (PWD) are routinely excluded from the disaster management cycle and ignored or forgotten during all ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Prepare to Win: Tsunami Awareness and Preparedness
Young students take part in Tsunami evacuation drills in Bali, Indonesia. Credit: UNDP Asia-PacificBy Asako OkaiUNITED NATIONS, Nov 5 2019 (IPS) Once considered rare in their occurrence, in the last 10 years tsunamis have struck nearly every year: from Samoa to Chile, and from Iceland to New Zealand. Usually triggered by a massive earthquake which is impossible to predict, there is often very little time to respond to a tsunami warning. Yet, if the warning is clear and people know what to do, thousands of lives can be saved. As we mark World Tsunami Awareness Day November 5, I’d like to express my appreciation to th...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Asako Okai Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

How to Get TB Patients to Take Their Pills? Persistent Texting and a ‘Winners Circle’
The drug regimens can be grueling, and patients often quit taking their medications. But turning it into a cellphone competition helps. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Donald G. McNeil Jr. Tags: Tuberculosis Text Messaging Epidemics New England Journal of Medicine World Health Organization Africa Nairobi (Kenya) Solomon Islands Source Type: news

Evaluating the process and outcomes of child death review in the Solomon Islands - Sandakabatu M, Nasi T, Titiulu C, Duke T.
While maternal and perinatal mortality auditing has been strongly promoted by the World Health Organization (WHO), there has been very limited promotion or evaluation of child death auditing in low/middle-income settings. In 2017, a standardised child deat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

World Health Organisation ’s New Effort Can Help End Neglected Tropical Diseases
In the Solomon Islands, approximately 40 percent of the population of 550,000 could have active Trachoma. Credit: Catherine Wilson/IPS.By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Aug 19 2019 (IPS) Recently, the World Health Organisation (WHO) launched global consultations for a new Roadmap on how to eliminate Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs). The roadmap would help achieve universal health coverage by 2030, address health emergencies and promote healthier populations. This intervention is unprecedented because it could begin to reverse the neglect and inequities that the 17 main NTDs bring. Many NTDs are debilitating and red...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Development & Aid Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

International experts call for action for world's 450 million scabies sufferers
(Murdoch Childrens Research Institute) An alignment of researchers, health ministries and the World Health Organization has outlined the steps to develop a global program to control scabies -- the parasitic disease affecting 450 million people annually in mainly low-income countries. The paper published in The Lancet journal was led by Murdoch Children's Research Institute, in collaboration with the International Alliance for the Control of Scabies, the World Health Organization, researchers and the Ethiopian, Solomon Islands and Fijian Health Ministries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mass drug administration reduces scabies cases by 90% in Solomon Islands' communities
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Mass drug administration of two antibiotics can be highly effective at reducing cases of scabies and the bacterial infection impetigo, according to new research published in Lancet Infectious Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a rat and bat helped heal a 90-year cultural rift
(Field Museum) Mammalogists from the Field Museum in Chicago, James Cook University, and the Australian Museum went to the Solomon Islands in search of a giant rat and monkey-faced bat -- and ended up playing a role in fostering peace between the Kwaio people of Malaita and the Western world. A reconciliation ceremony between the Kwaio and Australian scientists began the healing process for acts of violence committed in 1927, when the Solomon Islands were a British protectorate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adverse childhood experiences, mental health, and risk behaviors among men in the Solomon Islands - Lui PSC, Dunne MP, Baker P, Isom V.
We describe findi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking water
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A team of researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and other groups have found that increasing land clearing for logging in Solomon Islands-even with best management strategies in place -- will lead to unsustainable levels of soil erosion and significant impacts to downstream water quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Measuring peace using household-level data from post-conflict Solomon Islands - Forau L, Chand S.
The definition of peace and its quantification has challenged many researchers. The extant literature defines and measures peace in contradistinction to violence, thereby making the measure an indirect one. There is scope for the alternative of a direct me... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

How to save giant tropical fruit bats: Work with local hunters who use bat teeth as money
(Field Museum) Flying foxes-- giant fruit bats that look like winged German shepherd puppies-- are in trouble. But scientists suggest a new way to help protect the bats on the Solomon Islands: working with local hunters who use the bats' teeth as currency. The traditional practice, it turns out, is a positive thing for bat conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Giant Solomon Islands rat believed to eat coconuts discovered
Study of skull, as well as DNA analysis, confirms new species in genus of mosaic tailed rats or UromysA mysterious and elusive species of giant rat that lives in the dense rainforest canopy of the Solomon Islands, and is reputed to open coconuts with its teeth, has been discovered by scientists and is likely to be quickly listed as critically endangered.For decades, the rat ’s existence had been suspected, with traditional knowledge of the rat’s ecology noted in a publications. For example, in 1995,one account recorded traditional knowledge of “a very big rat that eats coconuts” and lived in the tre...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Michael Slezak Tags: Solomon Islands Animals Science Asia Pacific Mammals Environment Source Type: news

Tree-dwelling, coconut-cracking giant rat discovered in Solomon Islands
(Field Museum) Scientists have discovered a new species of giant rat. It's more than four times the size of the black rats that live in the US, it lives in trees, and it's rumored to crack open coconuts with its teeth. It's actually pretty cute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Unintentional injury prevention and the role of occupational therapy in the Solomon Islands: an integrative review - Daufanamae B, Franklin R, Eagers J.
INTRODUCTION: Unintentional injuries (injuries for which there is no evidence of a predetermined intent) are one of the leading causes of death worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although evidence demonstrates unintention... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Animals actively choose to match their surroundings to avoid predation
Animals can match their background to avoid detection by predators. For instance, numerous species have evolved color patterns that help them blend into their surroundings and avoid predators -- a phenomenon called crypsis. A new experimental study found that ghost crabs in the Solomon Islands may achieve crypsis by actively choosing to live in sand background that matches their body color. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Animals actively choose to match their surroundings to avoid predation
(Wiley) Animals can match their background to avoid detection by predators. For instance, numerous species have evolved color patterns that help them blend into their surroundings and avoid predators -- a phenomenon called crypsis. A new experimental study found that ghost crabs in the Solomon Islands may achieve crypsis by actively choosing to live in sand background that matches their body color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Health closer to home: transforming care in the Solomon Islands
About 30% of all births in the Solomon Islands happen at the National Referral Hospital, even though the capital accounts for just 13% of the sprawling archipelago ’s population. Of the nation’s 157 doctors, 126 are based here. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - March 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: health services [subject], universal health coverage [subject], universal health care, universal access, Feature [doctype], Solomon Islands [country], Western Pacific Region [region] Source Type: news

CDC Updates Zika Travel Advice for Pregnant Women CDC Updates Zika Travel Advice for Pregnant Women
The CDC says pregnant women should not travel to any area where there is a risk for Zika, and it adds Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Maldives, and Solomon Islands to travel advisory list.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Love Your Data Week, Day 5: Rescuing Unloved Data
How do data become unloved?  We data users don’t love data that are messy, poorly documented, incomplete, or unwieldy, to name just a few frustrations.  However, one important way that data become unloved is that they are just plain old.  Older data tend not to be machine-readable, which can pretty much be the kiss of death.  Digitization, while it’s improving, is still somewhat labor-intensive and costly, and so unless a data set is obviously worth the trouble, it may languish. However, researchers are starting to explore whether there may be some hidden gems worth rescuing.  One area ...
Source: Dragonfly - February 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Glusker Tags: News From NN/LM PNR Source Type: news

Multi-dimensional approach to tackling poverty takes off worldwide
Countries as far afield as the Solomon Islands, Canada, New Zealand, Mexico, South Africa and Uganda are turning to research carried out by Bristol experts to change how they define and tackle poverty. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 19, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, Faculty of Social Sciences and Law, School for Policy Studies; Press Release Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Unintentional injury prevention and the role of occupational therapy in the Solomon Islands: an integrative review - Daufanamae BU, Franklin RC, Eagers J.
INTRODUCTION: Unintentional injuries (injuries for which there is no evidence of a predetermined intent) are one of the leading causes of death worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although evidence demonstrates unintentiona... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

New species of pea-size crab parasitizing a date mussel has a name of a Roman god
(Pensoft Publishers) Tiny crabs, the size of a pea, dwell inside the mantles of various bivalves, living off the particulate food filtered by the host. A new species of these curious crustaceans has recently been reported from the Solomon Islands which parasitizes a date mussel. Characterized with an additional plate covering its upper carapace, its discoverers, who have published their finding in the open-access journal ZooKeys, have named it after Janus, the Roman two-faced god. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Domestic violence in the Solomon Islands - Ming MA, Stewart MG, Tiller RE, Rice RG, Crowley LE, Williams NJ.
The Solomon Islands has one of the highest rates of family and sexual violence (FSV) in the world with 64% of women aged 15-49 have reported physical and/or sexual abuse by a partner. The National Referral Hospital (NRH) in the capital, Honiara, is the onl... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Rising Sea Levels Swallow 5 Pacific Islands
Scientists' warnings that climate change will cause rising sea levels to swallow large swaths of land is playing out in the Solomon Islands. At least five islands there have plunged completely below the ocean's surface over the past several decades. Numerous others in the South Pacific island nation appear to be headed for a similar fate, a new study has found. “It’s a perfect storm,” co-author Simon Albert of the University of Queensland study told New Scientist. "There’s the background level of global sea-level rise, and then the added pressure of a natural trade wind cycle tha...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Defining population health vulnerability following an extreme weather event in an urban Pacific Island environment: Honiara, Solomon Islands - Natuzzi ES, Joshua C, Shortus M, Reubin R, Dalipanda T, Ferran K, Aumua A, Brodine S.
Extreme weather events are common and increasing in intensity in the southwestern Pacific region. Health impacts from cyclones and tropical storms cause acute injuries and infectious disease outbreaks. Defining population vulnerability to extreme weather e... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

The dangers to children from coconut tree trauma, in KiraKira, Solomon Islands: a retrospective clinical audit - Rehan R, Jones PD, Abdeen H, Rowas H, Dhaliwal J.
BACKGROUND: Kirakira is small community of 3,000 people and is the capital of Makira-Ulawa province in Solomon Islands. Kirakira is an impoverished community with a small 30 bed hospital with limited resources. This audit was conducted by final year studen... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: Tax Havens and Refugee Camps Describe Today's World
This week, two faces of globalization -- tax havens and refugee camps -- were dramatically on display. As the "Panama Papers" revealed, the super-rich and well-connected have been sending boatloads of money offshore to hide their wealth and escape taxation. Powerless and penniless refugees who risked their lives on rickety vessels to reach Europe's safe shores were being sent back from camps in Greece to an uncertain fate amid the violence, misery and insecurity of the regions from which they had escaped. Along with a consortium of other global media, The WorldPost this week has been following the continuing reve...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Brian Hackman obituary
My friend and colleague, Brian Hackman, who has died aged 81, was a geologist and amateur linguist who twice narrowly escaped death on his extensive travels. As a geologist he worked for governments around the world – and as a linguist he spoke German, Russian, French, Spanish and Welsh, as well as Kiswahili, Bahasa Indonesia and Bahasa Malaysia.He graduated in geology from the Royal School of Mines in London, and joined the Royal Engineers for his national service in Germany and Egypt, where he saw action during the Suez crisis in 1956. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 25, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Rodney Walshaw Tags: Geology Science modern languages and linguistics Education Solomon Islands Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Scientist under attack after he kills bird that took decades to find
Case of the moustached kingfisher pits those who think ‘collecting’ can save a species against those who believe we should never kill rare animalsFor Christopher Filardi of the American Museum of Natural History, there is nothing like the thrill of finding a mysterious species. Such animals live at the intersection of myth and biology – tantalising researchers with the prospect that they may be real, but eluding trustworthy documentation and closer study. Indeed, last month, Filardi waxed poetic on the hunt for the invisible beasts that none the less walk among us.“We search for them in earnest but ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Kaplan and Justin Wm Moyer for the Washington Post Tags: Biology Science Birds Wildlife Animals Animal welfare Conservation Environment Solomon Islands Source Type: news

Scientific Collections: Threats to Species Survival or an Easy Scapegoat?
Over the past few years, there has been a troubling rise in the number of individuals claiming that scientific collections contribute to species loss. These accusations are often filled with hyperbole, characterizing the practice of field collecting as indiscriminate, unnecessary, and barbaric -- sometimes going so far as to describe it as "slaughter." In a recent piece, the scientific collection of a single bird -- a mustached kingfisher in the Solomon Islands -- was portrayed as the "totally unnecessary killing of this remarkable sentient being." While debate in science is vital, these criticisms er...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 15, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Art Expedition Accidentally Uncovers Glow-In-The-Dark Sea Turtle
This article originally appeared on artnet News. A marine biologist studying coral reefs off the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific made an amazing discovery this week when he noticed a "bright red-and-green spaceship" approaching his way in the pitch dark waters. The glowing underwater body turned out to be a hawksbill sea turtle, a critically endangered species. While it is known that Hawksbill shells change colors depending on water temperature, the biofluorescent capacities of the marine reptile have never been recorded until now. The scientist, David Gruber, a National Geographic Emerging Ex...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists Discover 'Glowing' Sea Turtle
Marine biologist David Gruber didn’t plan to find a glowing sea turtle, but he’s glad he did. The associate professor of biology at City University of New York was diving in the Solomon Islands in July doing research on biofluorescence -- an animal’s ability to absorb certain types of light, then re-emit that light as a different color -- in small sharks and coral reefs. This transformation is made possible through the presence of special proteins, Gruber said. Animals that exhibit biofluorescence typically absorb and transform blue light, meaning that their neon patterns are visible deep i...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists Discover First Ever Glowing Sea Turtle
Marine biologists working in the Solomon Islands, in the south Pacific Ocean, captured video footage of a sea turtle exhibiting bioflourescence—glowing in the dark—the first reptile science has identified that exhibits the trait. David Gruber, a scientist with the City University of New York, was in the Solomon Islands in July conducting research on bioflourescence in sharks and coral reefs, species in which it has been observed previously, National Geographic reports. Bioflourescence, in which an animal reflects the blue light of the ocean as a different color, is different from bioluminescence, in which an a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: denvernicks2014 Tags: Uncategorized animals bioflourescence endangered marine biology Oceans Science sea turtle Source Type: news

At the Mercy of Mother Nature (and of Policies of Larger Nations)
The Vienna Convention for Protection of the Ozone Layer this month celebrates 30 years of environmental protection, including the establishment of the Montreal Protocol, which has successfully phased down hundreds of chemicals harmful to the ozone layer and to global climate. The one remaining challenge, the management of the powerful greenhouse gases called HFCs, is finally being negotiated after several years of calls for action by the Federated States of Micronesia and fellow island nations. Phasing down HFCs under the Montreal Protocol is essential to global climate-change mitigation this century and would enhance inte...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Extent, causes and impact of road traffic crashes in the Solomon Islands 1993-2012: data from the orthopaedic department at the National Referral Hospital, Honiara - Stewart MJ, Negin J, Farrell P, Houasia P, Munamua AB, Martiniuk A.
INTRODUCTION: Road traffic crashes constitute a considerable public health burden and represent the eighth leading cause of death and tenth leading cause of disability adjusted life years (DALYs) globally. However, very little is known about the extent, ca... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - August 2, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

People Are Asking Google If Climate Change Is Real
This year is shaping up to be the hottest on record.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Monday released temperature data for June, ranking it as the warmest June in history. As temperatures remain high, people are turning to Google to ask about climate change -- what it is, if it's real and how to stop it, among other queries.  (Though Google's data doesn't necessarily reflect people's attitude toward climate change or other environmental issues, there is a consensus in the scientific community that climate change is happening, that humans are largely responsible for ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A decade of peace: mental health issues and service developments in the Solomon Islands since 2003 - Maukera R, Blignault I.
OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing of the armed conflict that occurred in the Solomon Islands from 1998-2003 and the subsequent political unrest and natural disasters, and the developments in mental health service... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - July 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

New Guinea Flatworm, One Of The World's 'Worst' Invasive Species, Found In Florida
A worm called one of the world's "worst" invasive species by conservationists has been found in the United States for the first time, an international team of researchers announced on Tuesday. The Platydemus manokwari, also called the New Guinea flatworm, poses a major threat to the planet's snail biodiversity, according to an article published in the scientific journal PeerJ. "It is considered a danger to endemic snails wherever it has been introduced," the report states. The flatworm is thought to originate in New Guinea, but researchers say it has spread to Florida, New Caledonia, Puerto Rico, Singa...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 23, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

People on the Solomon Islands Have Killed Over 15,000 Dolphins For Their Teeth
Villagers in the Solomon Islands killed over 15,000 dolphins from 1976 to 2013 for their teeth, which are used as currency or personal ornamentation, according to a study published Wednesday in Royal Society Open Science. In 2013 alone, more than 1,600 dolphins were killed by residents in the village of Fanalei. The extracted teeth are valued at 70 cents apiece. The traditional hunting method involves up to thirty canoes driving dolphins to shore, where they are killed. Such hunts have been going on sporadically since the early histories of the villages. There was a brief respite in 2010 when the Earth Island Institute pai...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - May 7, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Sabrina Toppa Tags: Uncategorized Conservation dolphin teeth Dolphins Environment Fanalei solomon islands Source Type: news

Dolphins hunted to pay for brides
Killing in Solomon Islands continues despite attempts at compromise (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sendai Conference Stresses Importance of Women’s Leadership
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says boosting women’s leadership in disaster risk reduction would be a key element of the country’s new programme of international support. Credit: Jamshed Baruah/IPSBy Jamshed Baruah and Katsuhiro AsagiriSENDAI, Japan, Mar 16 2015 (IPS)Women play a critical role in reducing disaster risk and planning and decision-making during and after disasters strike, according to senior United Nations, government and civil society representatives.In fact, efforts at reducing risks can never be fully effective or sustainable if the needs and voices of women are ignored, they agreed.WFP Exe...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 16, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Jamshed Baruah and Katsuhiro Asagiri Tags: Active Citizens Aid Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Gender Global Global Governance Headlines Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Population Poverty & MDGs TerraViva United Nations Women & Climate Chan Source Type: news

When Ignorance Is Deadly: Pacific Women Dying From Lack of Breast Cancer Awareness
Local women's NGO, Vois Blong Mere, campaigns for women's rights in Honiara, capital of the Solomon Islands. Credit: Catherine Wilson/IPSBy Catherine WilsonSYDNEY, Jan 28 2015 (IPS)Women now face a better chance of surviving breast cancer in the Solomon Islands, a developing island state in the southwest Pacific Ocean, following the recent acquisition of the country’s first mammogram machine.But just a week ahead of World Cancer Day, celebrated globally on Feb. 4, many say that the benefit of having advanced medical technology, in a country where mortality occurs in 59 percent of women diagnosed with cancer, depends ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Catherine Wilson Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Population Poverty & MDGs Projects Regional Categories Women's Health Annals of Global H Source Type: news

Barking up the wrong tree: injuries due to falls from trees in Solomon Islands - Negin J, Vizintin P, Houasia P, Martiniuk AL.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate tree-related injuries in Solomon Islands by the types of trees involved, who is affected and the types of injuries caused. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive case series of all cases of injuries related to trees presenting to the Nat... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - December 20, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Falls Source Type: news

Establishing an early warning alert and response network following the Solomon Islands tsunami in 2013 - Bilve A, Nogareda F, Joshua C, Ross L, Betcha C, Durski K, Fleischl J, Nilles E.
On 6 February 2013, an 8.0 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that struck the Santa Cruz Islands, Solomon Islands, killing 10 people and displacing over 4700. APPROACH: A post-disaster assessment of the risk of epidemic disease transmission recomme... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 14, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news