Rationality by Steven Pinker review – reason and beyond
Our powers of reason have undoubtedly made the world a better place. So why are we so in thrall to fake news?‘Rationality ought to be the lodestar of everything we think or do.” This is the opening sentence of Steven Pinker’s call for a return to reason at a time when critical thinking and the grounding of belief in evidence is in short supply. Everyone, he argues, should want to be rational, yet 75% of Americans believe in at least one phenomenon that defies the laws of science, including psychic healing, extrasensory perception, haunted houses. Even intellectual sophisticates argue that reason, objectiv...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Karen Armstrong Tags: Science and nature books Culture Steven Pinker Science and scepticism Psychology Source Type: news

Vaccination Mandates Are an American Tradition. So Is the Backlash.
The roots of U.S. vaccine mandates predate both the U.S. and vaccines. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maggie Astor Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Biden, Joseph R Jr Epidemics Polls and Public Opinion Civil Rights and Liberties Smallpox Source Type: news

Fauci: DeSantis Wrong to Say Vaccines Just a Personal Choice Fauci: DeSantis Wrong to Say Vaccines Just a Personal Choice
Vaccines have been the solution to major public health emergencies in the past, Dr Anthony Fauci said, including smallpox, polio, and measles. But they rely on wide public adoption to work.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - September 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Pandemics Get Forgotten. But Not at This Museum.
The collection of the German Hygiene Museum shows that the same debates recur whenever disease breaks out, even if we don ’t remember them. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Annalisa Quinn Tags: Museums German Hygiene Museum Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Hygiene and Cleanliness Vaccination and Immunization Holocaust and the Nazi Era Smallpox Influenza Quarantine (Life and Culture) Dresden (Germany) Source Type: news

Single-cell analysis reveals divergent responses of human dendritic cells to the MVA vaccine
Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) is a live, attenuated human smallpox vaccine and a vector for the development of new vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Efficient activation of the immune system by MVA partially relies on its encounter with dendritic cells (DCs). MVA infection of DCs leads to multiple outcomes, including cytokine production, activation of costimulatory molecules for T cell stimulation, and cell death. Here, we examined how these diverse responses are orchestrated in human DCs. Single-cell analyses revealed that the response to MVA infection in DCs was limited to early viral gene expression. In ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - August 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Döring, M., De Azevedo, K., Blanco-Rodriguez, G., Nadalin, F., Satoh, T., Gentili, M., Lahaye, X., De Silva, N. S., Conrad, C., Jouve, M., Centlivre, M., Levy, Y., Manel, N. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Could COVID Be Eradicated Someday? Maybe, Experts Say
TUESDAY, Aug. 10, 2021 -- Could COVID-19 one day go the way of smallpox and polio? New research suggests it might be possible to beat the coronavirus with high vaccination rates and rapid responses to immunity-evading variants, the study authors... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 10, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Renowned epidemiologist says the world 'is closer to the beginning than the end' of the pandemic
Dr Larry Brilliant, part of the WHO team to eradicate smallpox, told CNBC's Street Signs that the pandemic is not close to over because only 15% of the world has been vaccinated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Emergent BioSolutions lands $182M extension on smallpox vaccine contract
The extension follows a tumultuous time for the Gaithersburg company, making it unclear if the government would proceed with deals as normal. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - July 21, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

Apocalypse Now? Christian Fundamentalists and COVID-19
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Jun 17 2021 (IPS)   Getting hard to breathe hard to believe in anything at all, but fear. Peter Gabriel, Mother of ViolenceLike most male Swedes of my age I had to enter obligatory military service for almost a year. In my barrack was a “born-again-Christian” who when he became angry shouted “Now you mock me, but when the Last Judgement has come I will sit in heaven and smile down at you while you burn in Hell!” Since then I have wondered about the last book of the Bible, the Book of Revelation. It was written by a frustrated Christian man who by the end of 100 C...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Crime & Justice Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Mandating COVID-19 Vaccines for PALTC Staff: The Ethical Argument
Vaccine mandates have been a prickly issue in this country since the smallpox vaccine initiatives in the early 20th century. That ’s not surprising, of course. America, a country that generally holds individual freedoms to be mainly inviolable, has a hard time constraining those freedoms in the interest of the common good. Despite this, public health mandates such as childhood vaccines, masking, and travel restrictions have been considered ethical as long as they satisfy three criteria: the risk of allowing unfettered individual choice must represent a significant danger to society, the benefit of the mandate must be...
Source: Caring for the Ages - May 29, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: James Wright Tags: Medical Ethics Source Type: news

Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer review – the gobsmacking truth about vaccines
Want a booster shot of knowledge? David Olusoga and Steven Johnson ’s new show will teach you about the magic, and the horrors, behind the medical breakthroughs of our timeIn 1900, the average global life expectancy was 32. Today, a tiny blink of historical time later, it ’s twice that. In a developed country, you will most likely live to see your grandchildren and can hope not unreasonably to see a great-grandson or daughter, too. The new four-part series Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer (BBC Four), presented byhistorian David Olusoga and US science writer Steven Johnson, explores how a handful of ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lucy Mangan Tags: Television & radio Culture Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Race World news Slavery History of science Medical research Coronavirus Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Put People Before Profits for Progress
By Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, May 18 2021 (IPS) Millions of people are expected to die due to delayed and unaffordable access to COVID-19 tests, treatment, personal protective equipment and vaccines. Urgent cooperation is desperately needed to save lives and livelihoods for all. Vaccine apartheid Thus far, rich countries have bought up most available vaccine supplies. By mid-April, rich countries had received more than 87 percent of the more than 700 million vaccine doses dispensed worldwide, while poor countries had received only 0.2 percent. Jomo Kwame SundaramA quarter of the former’s population...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

How the Human Life Span Doubled in 100 Years
Between 1920 and 2020, the average human life span doubled. How did we do it? Science mattered — but so did activism. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steven Johnson Tags: Coronavirus Risks and Safety Concerns Epidemics Smallpox Antibiotics Disease Rates Vaccination and Immunization Influenza Epidemic (1918-19) Longevity Population Milk Infant Mortality Statistics Cholera Food and Drug Administrati Source Type: news

Edward Jenner Pioneered Vaccination. Will His Museum Survive a Pandemic?
The site where Dr. Jenner first inoculated people against smallpox has struggled in the coronavirus lockdowns, one of hundreds of museums in Britain teetering amid the closures. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Megan Specia Tags: Museums Jenner, Edward Smallpox Vaccination and Immunization Historic Buildings and Sites Great Britain England Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Quarantine (Life and Culture) Source Type: news

How Mary Wortley Montagu's bold experiment led to smallpox vaccine – 75 years before Jenner
A new book celebrates the trailblazing work of the English aristocrat, who successfully inoculated her daughterIt was a daring and dangerous experiment that paved the way for the development of the first safe vaccine and saved countless lives. Yet whenLady Mary Wortley Montagu deliberately infected her own daughter with a tiny dose ofsmallpox– successfully inoculating the three-year-old child in 1721 – her ideas were dismissed and she was denounced by 18th-century society as an “ignorant woman” .Three hundred years later, on the anniversary of that first groundbreaking inoculation on English soil, a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Ferguson Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Books UK news History Epidemics Health Science Medical research Culture World news Aristocracy Society Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Vaccine efforts move forward at Mayo Clinic
Humanity has taken on infectious agents, such as the virus that causes smallpox, and won. But cheer quietly. Smallpox eradication took 200 years, and it's just one of the many diseases out there. But hey, researchers are nothing if not persistent, right? A Mayo Clinic lab member is purifying an adenovirus vector for preclinical testing. That's [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 27, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Over 200 years ago, a bold smallpox experiment in a New England town proved the success of vaccines
The demonstration involving 12 young smallpox vaccine pioneers was a landmark for public acceptance of vaccination. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Blakemore Source Type: news

We ’ll Probably Never Eliminate COVID-19 from the U.S. It’s Still Worth Trying
2021 got off to a grim pandemic start in the U.S. A huge surge in COVID-19 cases followed the holiday season, peaking at around 300,000 new cases on Jan. 8, 2020. More than 20,000 Americans lost their lives to the virus in a single week in January alone and over 146,00 in total have died since the start of the year. But six weeks later, the picture looks more promising. New daily cases have fallen sharply, daily deaths have fallen to levels not seen since Thanksgiving, and the pace of vaccine roll-out is speeding up. These positive trends mean that we can now begin to ask what the endgame might look like. Would we be happy...
Source: TIME: Health - February 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: William Hanage and Gavin Yamey Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Vaccination passports are nothing new – and the sooner we have them, the better | Letter
I still have the stamped and dated certificates for smallpox and yellow fever that were required for travel in the 1950s and 60s, writesDr David BoswellJust before the inoculation programme was rolled out, I wrote to my GP pointing out that soon travel agents, airlines and other countries would require certificates of vaccination against Covid-19, and asking what was being done to provide these (Coronavirus vaccine strategy needs rethink after resistant variants emerge, say scientists, 8 February). I got no reply.Now this is a major issue. Yet one is only given a tiny card recording the date and type of vaccine. This is cl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Travel Source Type: news

Intellectual Property Cause of Death, Genocide
By Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis ChowdhuryKUALA LUMPUR and SYDNEY, Feb 9 2021 (IPS) Refusal to temporarily suspend several World Trade Organization (WTO) intellectual property (IP) provisions to enable much faster and broader progress in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic should be grounds for International Criminal Court prosecution for genocide. Jomo Kwame SundaramMaking life-saving vaccines, medicines and equipment available, freely or affordably, has been crucial for containing the spread of many infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, HIV-AIDS, polio and smallpox. Jonas Salk, who developed the polio vaccine, insisted...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis Chowdhury Tags: Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Could understanding the history of anti-vaccine sentiment help us to overcome it?
Ever since Edward Jenner developed the first vaccine for smallpox there have been opportunistic people willing to spread misinformation. As the Covid-19 vaccines are administered, what ’s the best way to counter them?Sarah and her brother Benjamin (not their real names) have never seen eye to eye. She ’s a professional scientist, he – according to Sarah’s description – is someone who is susceptible to conspiracy theories. They maintained an uneasy truce until a few weeks ago. Tensions came to a head when Sarah was on the phone to her mum, talking her through the online procedure to book a slot...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Source Type: news

A Look at Past Vaccine Drives: Smallpox, Polio and the Swine Flu
As governments begin rolling out the biggest vaccine drives in history, a look at mass vaccination campaigns of the past offers insight into mistakes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jenny Gross Tags: Smallpox Vaccination and Immunization Swine Influenza Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news

Five Past Vaccine Drives and How They Worked
As governments begin rolling out the biggest vaccine drives in history, a look at mass vaccination campaigns of the past offers insight into mistakes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jenny Gross Tags: Smallpox Vaccination and Immunization Swine Influenza Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news

South Africa: Immunisation Record Risks Being Dented By Anti-Vaccination Views
[The Conversation Africa] Vaccination has eradicated smallpox, nearly eradicated polio, and led to major reductions of serious infectious diseases. These include diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, and measles. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 22, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

TNCs Reviving TPP Frankenstein
By Jomo Kwame SundaramKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 12 2021 (IPS) The incoming Biden administration is under tremendous pressure to demonstrate better US economic management. Trade negotiations normally take years to conclude, if at all. Unsurprisingly, lobbyists are already urging the next US administration to quickly embrace and deliver a new version of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Jomo Kwame Sundaram Trump legacy Repackaging and reselling a TPP avatar will not be easy. Well before Trump’s election, even the official mid-2016 International Trade Commission’s assessment doubted Peterson Institute of Int...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Economy & Trade Featured Financial Crisis Global Globalisation Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse North America TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

An Appreciation for Vaccines, and How Far They Have Come
The DTP vaccine teaches us about how brilliant vaccine technology can be, but also how it can be studied and improved over time. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Perri Klass, M.D. Tags: Whooping Cough Vaccination and Immunization Tetanus Smallpox Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Children and Childhood Diphtheria Poliomyelitis Source Type: news

Here ’s What’s Behind Americans’ Uneasy Relationship With Vaccines
Time was, nobody quarreled with the idea of a new vaccine. In 1955, church bells rang and headlines blared when Jonas Salk announced that his new vaccine against polio was safe, effective and powerful. Similar, if more subdued, enthusiasm greeted the introduction of the measles vaccine in 1963 and the global eradication of smallpox in 1980. But we live in a more suspicious and cynical time. Even as the world has desperately awaited the development of the recently introduced COVID-19 vaccines, only 70% of Americans say they will take them, according to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll. Fewer than half of Americans rec...
Source: TIME: Health - December 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How New York City Vaccinated 6 Million People in Less Than a Month
When a single case of smallpox arrived in Manhattan in 1947, a severe outbreak was possible. A decisive civil servant made a bold decision. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Florio and Ouisie Shapiro Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Smallpox Epidemics Advertising Council ' Dwyer, William New York City Weinstein, Israel Content Type: Personal Profile Source Type: news

Misinformation on Social Media Fuels Vaccine Hesitancy: a Global Study Shows the Link
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Misinformation on Social Media Fuels Vaccine Hesitancy: a Global Study Shows the Link appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Vaccines Are Coming, but Pandemic Experts Expect a'Horrible' Winter
With vaccines and a new administration, the pandemic will be tamed. But experts say the coming months “are going to be just horrible.” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Donald G. McNeil Jr. Tags: Presidential Transition (US) Presidential Election of 2020 Clinical Trials Smallpox Vaccination and Immunization Medicine and Health Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Governors (US) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention AstraZeneca PLC Eli Source Type: news

Tales From The Vaccine Vault: 30 Facts About Smallpox And The Coronavirus
If the coronavirus caused scars like smallpox did, people who can ’t be bothered with social distancing might be more careful. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rebecca Coffey, Contributor Tags: Science /science Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Daily Mail has turned against the anti-vaxxers it used to champion | Polly Toynbee
As the paper lends its support to a Covid vaccine, don ’t expect any acknowledgement of the damage it did over MMRAnti-vaxxers are as old as the very first vaccine. Edward Jenner, who saved the world from the scourge of smallpox, facedferocious opposition.When Prince Albert unveiled a posthumous statue to him inTrafalgar Square in 1858, it was met withvirulent opposition from anti-vaxxers, backed by the military who regarded Trafalgar Square plinths as exclusively theirs.Pulling down statues is nothing new or “woke”. The Times called for Jenner’s to be removed and within a year of Albert’s dea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Polly Toynbee Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Daily Mail Health Infectious diseases Media Medical research National newspapers & magazines Science Society World news Paul Dacre Source Type: news

The Covid Pandemic: Broadening the Discourse
Thailand’s COVID-19 response an example of resilience and solidarity: a UN Resident Coordinator’s BlogBy Asoka BandarageCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Nov 10 2020 (IPS) SARS-CoV-2, the corona virus that causes COVID-19, has been spreading exponentially across the world over the last ten or so months. As of November 6th, according to the Center for Systems Science at Johns Hopkins University, there have been 49,195,581 cases of COVID-19, including 1,241,031 deaths. More than a third of the global population has been placed on lockdown. The global economy is experiencing the deepest global recession since World War 2 and m...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Asoka Bandarage Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

J. Michael Lane, a General in the Rout of Smallpox, Dies at 84
At the C.D.C., he waged a 13-year campaign to vanquish a deadly infectious disease that had ravaged the world for centuries. Victory came in 1977. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert D. McFadden Tags: Deaths (Obituaries) Smallpox Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Health Organization Vaccination and Immunization Lane, J Michael (1936-2020) Doctors Source Type: news

Scientists to Infect Volunteers With COVID - 19 in Challenge Trial
Challenge trials have long history, going back to development of smallpox vaccine in 1796 (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - October 21, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, Pathology, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Institutional, Source Type: news

U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines
On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines. The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines
On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines. The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially...
Source: TIME: Science - October 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How do pandemics end? In different ways, but it ’s never quick and never neat | Mark Honigsbaum
Just like the Black Death, influenza and smallpox, Covid-19 will affect almost every aspect of our of lives – even after a vaccine turns upOn 7 September 1854, in the middle of a raging cholera epidemic, the physician John Snow approached the board of guardians of St James ’s parish for permission toremove the handle from a public water pump in Broad Street in London ’s Soho. Snow observed that 61 victims of the cholera had recently drawn water from the pump and reasoned that contaminated water was the source of the epidemic. His request was granted and, even though it would take a further 30 years for th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science Cholera Health Society UK news Source Type: news

In Terms of Child Mortality, It ’s a Good Time for Public Health
Despite the crises of 2020, parents can realistically expect that children born today will outlive them. That wasn ’t always the case. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Perri Klass, M.D. Tags: Children and Childhood Infant Mortality Babies and Infants Parenting Epidemics Vaccination and Immunization Smallpox Cholera Antibiotics Source Type: news

Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
(American Chemical Society) Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting inACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sustained release of vaccine components, increasing the potency, quality and duration of immune responses in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

A new theory asks: Could a mask be a crude ‘vaccine’?
The unproven idea, described in a commentary published Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, is inspired by the age-old concept of variolation, the deliberate exposure to a pathogen to generate a protective immune response. First tried against smallpox, the risky practice eventually fell out of favor, but paved the way for the rise of modern vaccines. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - September 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Declares Africa Polio-Free
Nobody will ever know the identity of the thousands of African children who were not killed or paralyzed by polio this year. They would have been hard to keep track of no matter what because in ordinary times, they would have followed thousands last year and thousands the year before and on back in a generations-long trail of suffering and death. Instead, no African children were claimed by polio this year or last year or the year before. It was in 2016 that the last case of wild, circulating polio was reported in Nigeria—the final country on the 54-nation African continent where the disease was endemic. And with a r...
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Coronavirus will be with us forever, Sage scientist warns
Sir Mark Walport says, unlike smallpox, coronavirus will not be eradicated by vaccination. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - August 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bill Gates on How the U.S. Can Course Correct Its COVID-19 Response: ‘You Wish Experts Were Taking Charge’
The U.S. domestic response to the COVID-19 pandemic thus far has been “weak,” Bill Gates believes. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation co-chair and Microsoft co-founder told TIME senior health correspondent Alice Park during a TIME100 Talks discussion on Thursday that he’d give the U.S.’s COVID-19 response, “on a relative and absolute basis, not a passing grade.” But, he added, the U.S.’s funding for vaccine and therapeutic research “has been the best in the world,” so if it coordinates to share resources globally, the U.S. could “potentially score the highest&...
Source: TIME: Health - July 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk TIME100 Talks Source Type: news

Smallpox Vaccine Has Lessons for COVID Vaccine
In this study, researchers reconstructed and analyzed the genomes of smallpox virus fragments recovered from vaccination kits used during the Civil War era. They were able to do this without damaging the artifacts. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news