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Do YOU know symptoms of deadly sepsis? Drive to spot signs of silent killer steps up
SEPSIS, also known as septicaemia or blood poisoning can be a fatal condition and knowing the symptoms can be crucial to saving lives. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bacterial infection warning: Do YOU know the symptoms of these five serious types?
BACTERIAL infections can vary in severity, with septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis causing serious symptoms. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sepsis treatment: New blood test could bring diagnosis forward a ‘crucial’ 16 hours
SEPSIS - also called blood poisoning and septicaemia - could be diagnosed much more quickly by using a blood sample, rather than spending hours monitoring vital signs and key symptoms. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hereford toddler loses his hands and feet  to meningitis
Two-year-old Finley Amos, from Hereford, had four amputations after contracting meningitis and septicaemia. His parents say he has coped with the partial loss of his limbs better than they have. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mum lost 21st after message from beyond the grave
Joanne Howes, 38, from County Durham, said that a memory flashed into her mind of her husband Christian - warning her to stay healthy for their kids - after her died from septicaemia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mother lost 21 stone after message from beyond the grave
Joanne Howes, 38, from County Durham, said that a memory flashed into her mind of her husband Christian - warning her to stay healthy for their kids - after her died from septicaemia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meningococcal septicaemia associated with attending a funeral – Liberia
On 25 April 2017, the Ministry of Health (MoH) of Liberia notified WHO and partners of a cluster of sudden deaths of unknown aetiology in Sinoe County. The event started on 23 April 2017, when an 11-year-old female had been admitted to hospital presenting with diarrhoea, vomiting, and mental confusion after attending the funeral of a religious leader on 22 April 2017. The child died within one hour of admission. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - July 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Parents urged to remind teenagers to get MenACWY vaccine
Public Health England is calling for more take up of the MenACWY vaccine in eligible young people, which protects against deadly meningitis and septicaemia. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - July 6, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

What Happens When Antibiotics Don’t Treat Meningitis Anymore?
For many years, antibiotics have been used to treat bacterial meningitis, the deadliest form of the disease. But this year, according to a major UK report [1] followed by a World Health Organization (WHO) resolution, the threat that antibiotics could soon start to fail is upon us. This is because bacteria find new ways to evade antibiotics all the time. The result is that by the time today’s generation of first time parents are becoming first time grandparents, drug-resistant infections including meningitis could kill 10 million people across the world each year. [1] This isn’t just a major threat to global hea...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 7, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

WHO Says New Drugs Urgently Needed To Fight 12 'Priority Pathogens'
New antibiotics need to be developed urgently to combat 12 families of bacteria, the World Health Organization said on Monday, describing these “priority pathogens” as the greatest threats to human health. The United National health agency said many of these bacteria have already evolved into deadly superbugs that are resistant to many antibiotics. The bugs “have built-in abilities to find new ways to resist treatment” the WHO said, and can also pass on genetic material that allows other bacteria to become drug-resistant. Governments need to invest in research and development (R&D)if new drugs a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meningitis WARNING: Symptoms of deadly disease can be mistaken for HANGOVER
SYMPTOMS of meningitis and septicaemia can be confused with the effects of drug or alcohol use - with early warning signs including fever, headache and sickness that quickly get worse. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meningitis WARNING: Symptoms of deadly disease mistaken for HANGOVER
SYMPTOMS of meningitis and septicaemia can be confused with the effects of drug or alcohol use - with early warning signs including fever, headache and sickness that quickly get worse. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boy who lost his legs and one of his hands to meningitis is now walking again
Kye Vincent, from Leighton Buzzard, was diagnosed with meningococcal septicaemia earlier this year. It ravaged his body and doctors were forced to put him in an induced coma to keep him alive. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tia Llewellyn sent home from school with 'sick bug' dies after given 5% chance of survival
Tia Llewellyn, from Milford Haven, Wales, was diagnosed with a rare form of soft-tissue cancer. But after contracting a chest infection and septicaemia, the schoolgirl passed away on Friday night. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fever or vomiting? Meningitis and sepsis symptoms can be mistaken for FLU or norovirus
CASES of meningitis and and septicaemia could rise over Christmas, with experts urging people not to mistake critical early-warning signs of the deadly conditions for flu symptoms. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccine cuts cases of meningitis and septicaemia in UK infants
This press release outlines how the number of cases of 2 External 0 0 0 meningitis and septicaemia false https://www.gov.uk/government/news/vaccine-cuts-cases-of-meningitis-and-septicaemia-in-uk-infants true false%> caused by meningococcal group B (MenB) infection in eligible infants has nearly halved over the last year after a new vaccine against the disease was introduced, according to Public Health England (PHE) research. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Birmingham mechanic who lost limbs from blood poisoning can work again with bionic arm
Mark Camamile, 33, from Nottingham, had both legs and right hand amputated after contracting septicaemia. His work colleagues raised £27,000 in 5 days for the life-changing tool. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Freshers urged to get meningitis and septicaemia jab
New figures show less than a fifth of young people have received the MenW vaccine so far this year. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - September 20, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Vaccine programme cuts cases of meningitis and septicaemia in UK infants
Meningitis and septicaemia cases caused by MenB have nearly halved in eligible infants over the last yearHide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - September 6, 2016 Category: Practice Management Authors: Carolyn Wickware Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Patients Latest News Source Type: news

Vaccine programme cuts cases of meningitis and septicaemia in UK infants
Meningitis and septicaemia cases caused by MenB have nearly halved in eligible infants over the last yearHide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Nursing in Practice)
Source: Nursing in Practice - September 6, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: carolynwickware Tags: Children ' s health Editor s pick Latest News Source Type: news

Vaccine slashes cases of meningitis B in infants
Meningitis and septicaemia cases caused by Meningococcal group B have nearly halved in eligible infants since the recent introduction of immunisation, according to Public Health England. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - September 6, 2016 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

New PHE report reveals Bexsero vaccine reduced MenB cases in UK infants by half
The latest report published by the Public Health England (PHE) revealed that the number of cases of meningitis and septicaemia in UK infants has reduced after new vaccine Bexsero was introduced last year. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - September 5, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Vaccine cuts cases of meningitis and septicaemia in UK infants
The number of cases of meningitis and septicaemia caused by meningococcal group B (MenB) infection in eligible infants has nearly halved over the last year after a new vaccine against the disease was introduced, according to Public Health England (PHE) research. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - September 5, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Meningitis B: New vaccine for ‘terrible disease’ has nearly HALVED the number of cases
THE number of cases of meningitis and septicaemia caused by meningococcal group B infection - or Meningitis B - has nearly halved over the last year after a new vaccine against the disease was introduced. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meningitis W vaccination push for university students
Public Health England has published advice on meningitis and septicaemia vaccinations, urging young people to get immunised before starting university. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - August 19, 2016 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

PHE publishes advice on meningitis and septicaemia vaccinations
Young people are urged to get vaccinated against meningitis and septicaemia before starting university. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - August 17, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

What is Meningitis W? Students are at risk from aggressive and DEADLY infection, PHE warns
YOUNG people going to college or starting university are being urged to get vaccinated against meningitis and septicaemia because of the deadly MenW bug. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Let 5-year-old Sherry Tell You How Handwashing with Soap Saves Lives
Eunice, an expectant mother in Migori County in Kenya. Photo Credit: LifebuoyBy Dr Myriam Sidibe and Siddharth ChatterjeeMigori County, Kenya, Jun 24 2016 (IPS)For twenty-six year old Eunice from Migori County,Kenya, celebrating her daughter Sherry’s fifth birthday is a milestone that few of her friends have enjoyed. As with many areas of Africa, a child born in Migori is seven times more likely to die before the age of five, compared to a child in Europe. Despite recent gains in improving maternal and child survival rates in Africa, the continent still rates the lowest in the world. In Kenya, child mortality stands ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Myriam Sidibe and Siddharth Chatterjee Tags: Africa Aid Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Women's Health Source Type: news

Teen spent a month in Colchester hospital after doctors dismissed MRSA and septicaemia
The family of Kieran Johns (below, right) have accused Colchester General Hospital's A&E department of missing vital cues that their son had a dangerous superbug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pictures show why you should NEVER give a child with chickenpox ibuprofen
Hayley Lyons, from Warrington, shared photos of her son Lewis at Alder Hey Children's Hospital after he developed septicaemia. The post has now been shared almost 350,000 times. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teen ­quadruple amputee told to prove his disability or have his benefits stopped
Edward Bright, 16, from Ripley, Derbys, had to have his limbs amputated when he contracted septicaemia as a seven-year-old, but was told by officials to prove his disability. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications.Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found that elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene.Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications. Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene. Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we do...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Scientists 'see' detailed make-up of deadly toxin for the first time
An exciting advance provides hope for developing novel potential method of treating pneumococcal diseases such as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. A team of researchers uses a technique called X-ray crystallography to see the individual atoms of the toxin. World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that more than 1.6 million people every year die from pneumococcal infections, including more than 800,000 children under 5 years old. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 24, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists 'see' detailed make-up of deadly toxin for the first time
(University of Leicester) Exciting advance provides hope for developing novel potential method of treating pneumococcal diseases such as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. University of Leicester uses technique called X-ray crystallography at Diamond Light Source, the UK's national synchrotron science facility, to see the individual atoms of the toxin. World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that more than 1.6 million people every year die from pneumococcal infections, including more than 800,000 children under 5 years old. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 24, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Out-of-date cosmetics and make up might be making you sick
Six products were tested by London Metropolitan University with four out of the five testing positive for enterococcus faecalis, bacteria which causes meningitis and Septicaemia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Student who lost ends of her fingers AND toes to meningitis urges others to get vaccinated
EXCLUSIVE: Sophie Royce, from Reigate, was diagnosed with meningococcal W septicaemia at 21. Today a new programme for 17 and 18-year-olds is rolled out to get them vaccinated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New programmes to protect against meningitis and septicaemia
The two programmes, was announced by public health minister Jane Ellison, will be introduced in England. From August 2015 all 17 and 18 year olds in school year 13 will be offered a combined vaccine that protects against the A, C, W and Y strains of meningococcal disease. The vaccine is particularly important for those who are heading off to university, as they are at greater risk. The vaccine will also be available to older students aged 19 to 25 who are starting university this year. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - June 23, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: Maria Axford Source Type: news

Meningitis B vaccine 'available from September'
"All newborn babies in England and Scotland are to be offered a vaccine to combat meningitis B from September," BBC News reports. This will be the world’s first publicly funded vaccination programme for the potentially fatal disease.   What is meningitis B? Meningitis B is a highly aggressive strain of bacterial meningitis that infects the protective membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. It is very serious and should be treated as a medical emergency. If the infection is left untreated, it can cause severe brain damage and infect the blood (septicaemia). In some cases, bacterial meningi...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Hysterectomy advice for a worried brummy – Donna’s story
The post Hysterectomy advice for a worried brummy – Donna’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. I’ve always been fit and healthy and always thought I would be. However in November 2014 I became ill with severe abdominal pain 2 the point I couldn’t work or do anything. I had an ultrasound revealing a dermoid cyst. Surgery was arranged but the night before I was due to go into hospital I was in so much pain they took me by ambulance as they assumed it was rupturing. I went ahead with the surgery only to find it wasn’t a cyst but a abscess in my uterus caused by my coil perfora...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - June 15, 2015 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Tags: Your Stories dermoid cyst Source Type: news

Flesh-eating bug septicaemia triggered by COLD 'ate away' father's arms and legs
John Rushton, 42, from Tilbury, Essex, contracted septicaemia after suffering pneumonia. The infection caused his limbs to rot away, forcing doctors to amputate to save his life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boy diagnosed with meningitis but mum thought it was allergies
Kay Gould, 35, from Newcastle, has told how son Evan Taylor spent 11 days in hospital with meningococcal septicaemia and now has to take antibiotics every day after the incident. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Danny Pearce was misiagnosed with tonsillitis and died of meningitis
Danny Pearce, 4, died from meningococcal septicaemia just hours after arriving home. Bosses at Lewisham Hospital have since agreed an out-of-court settlement with his family. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meningitis B jab to be added to NHS child vaccine schedule
"All babies in the UK will soon have a potentially life-saving vaccine against meningitis B," The Guardian reports. The vaccine, Bexsero, will soon be offered to babies once they reach the age of two months, followed by two more booster shots. What is meningitis B?Meningitis B is a highly aggressive strain of bacterial meningitis that infects the protective membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. It is very serious and should be treated as a medical emergency. If the infection is left untreated, it can cause severe brain damage and infect the blood (septicaemia). In some cases, bacterial mening...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

All teens should be vaccinated against rare strain of meningitis
"A vaccination for meningitis is to be offered to all 14-18 year-olds in England and Wales, after a spike in a rare strain of the disease," The Guardian reports. The strain – meningitis W (MenW) – is described as rare, but life-threatening. There has been a year-on-year increase in the number of meningitis cases caused by MenW since 2009, and infection has been associated with particularly severe disease and high fatality rates in teenagers and young adults. The increasing trend looks set to continue unless action is taken, so the government’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medication Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Septicaemia Therapeutics Clinical Trials Review 2014 Report at...
ReportsnReports.com adds “Septicaemia Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2014” to its store. The report provides data on the Septicaemia clinical trial scenario.(PRWeb January 05, 2015)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/septicaemia-clinical/review-h2-2014-market/prweb12420980.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 6, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Why adolescents carry meningitis-causing bacteria
Scientists have shed new light on why teenagers and young adults are particularly susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia. N. meningitidis is a major cause of meningitis and septicaemia, and a leading cause of infectious disease among teenagers and young adults. While it is well known that these bacteria are found in large numbers in the upper respiratory tract among adolescents, the reasons for this are unknown. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 4, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

New insights into why adolescents carry meningitis-causing bacteria
(University of York) University of York scientists have shed new light on why teenagers and young adults are particularly susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 4, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Corinne Hutton to be first person in the UK to have double hand transplant
Corinne Hutton, from Lochwinnoch in Scotland, is expected to have the groundbreaking surgery in September this year, after losing both hands and lower legs to septicaemia last year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 25, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mother, 44, will become first person in the country to have double hand transplant after losing all four limbs to blood poisoning
Corinne Hutton, from Lochwinnoch in Scotland, is expected to have the groundbreaking surgery in September this year, after losing both hands and lower legs to septicaemia last year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 25, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news