MKSAP: 67-year-old man with primary hyperparathyroidism
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 67-year-old man is evaluated for a recent diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism after an elevated serum calcium level was incidentally detected on laboratory testing. Medical history is significant only for hypertension, and his only medication is ramipril. On physical examination, temperature is 35.8 °C (96.4 °F), blood pressure is 120/68 mm Hg, pulse rate is 62/min, and respiration rate is 14/min. BMI is 32. The remainder of his examination is unremarkable. Laboratory studies: Creatinin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 11, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

Amgen CEOs Prosper Despite (or Because of) Continuing Ethical Questions
This is becoming a familiar narrative on Health Care Renewal: top health care leaders continue to enrich themselves while their organizations' behavior continues to raise ethical questions.For our latest example we return to the ongoing adventures of biotechnology giant Amgen.CEOs Get Richer An AP story (via the LA Times) documented the continuing enrichment of its current CEO:Amgen Inc's new chief executive, Robert A. Bradway, received total compensation of $13.6 million in 2012, more than his predecessor, according to an analysis of a company regulatory filing.Bradway, who was promoted from chief operating officer to chi...
Source: Health Care Renewal - May 2, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: Amgen executive compensation kickbacks legal settlements adverse effects Source Type: blogs

In a Pre-emptive Strike, Amgen & Genentech (Roche) Lobby States to Block Biosimilars
No doubt you've heard of how Amgen essentially paid off U.S. Senators to sneak a provision in the "fiscal cliff" bill that delays price restraints on a class of drugs used by kidney dialysis patients, including Sensipar, a drug made by Amgen (see "Big Pharma buys off the Senate"). That "richly embroidered loophole" will cost taxpayers a half a billion dollars.Although a bill was proposed to close the Amgen loophole in federal law, Amgen and Genentech, which is owned by Roche, are lobbying (i.e., paying) state lawmakers to block generic versions of their products according to the New York Times...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - January 29, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: Amgen Genentech Roche Lobbying generics biosimilar Source Type: blogs

Time to Refill Your Prescription For Zxygjfb
The brand names of drugs are famously odd. But they seem to be getting odder. That's the conclusion of a longtime reader, who sent this along: I was recently perusing through the recent drug approval list and was struck by how strange the trade names have become. Perhaps it is a request from the FDA so that there are fewer prescription errors, but some of these are really bizarre and don't quite roll off the tongue. USAN names I can understand, but trade names, to me anyway, used to be much more polished (Viagra, Lipitor etc). Could it have to do with the fact that most of these are for cancer? I have a list below co...
Source: In the Pipeline - January 28, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Business and Markets Source Type: blogs

Lobbying 101 contd. Amgen busted
Lawmakers seek to repeal 'fiscal-cliff' provision aiding Amgen A bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers is seeking to repeal a Medicare-pricing provision in the recent "fiscal-cliff" deal in Congress that benefits Thousand Oaks biotech giant Amgen Inc. Legislation to eliminate the exemption for a class of drugs, including Amgen's Sensipar, that are used by kidney dialysis patients, was filed this week by U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.). The fiscal cliff legislation approved this month excluded these oral medications from Medicare price controls for an additional two years. "Amgen managed to get a $500-million p...
Source: PharmaGossip - January 25, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Bill Would Repeal The Amgen Gift From Washington
Following disclosure that the recently passed ‘fiscal cliff’ bill delays Medicare price restraints on a group of medications that will benefit Amgen while costing taxpayers up to $500 million over two years, a Vermont congressman yesterday introduced legislation to repeal the controversial largesse. The ‘fiscal cliff’ bill gives the biotech an extra two years to sell Sensipar, a pill that is used for kidney dialysis and generatd $808 million in sales in 2011. But Amgen also contributed generously to several US Senators who had direct influence over the final language (back story and section 632 in t...
Source: Pharmalot - January 24, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Ed Silverman Tags: Uncategorized Amgen Kidney Dialysis Max Baucus Orrin Hatch Source Type: blogs

How the "Revolving Door" and Other Aspects of Corporatism Benefited Amgen Just After its Settlement and Guilty Plea
At least here in these United States, our health care corporatism is bipartisan.  Here we present a sorry story of how a company that should have been shamed by dishonest behavior that likely harmed patients instead apparently was awarded special treatment through its cozy relationships with top government leaders   Accusations of Kickbacks and Deceptive Marketing of Aranesp  Last month, biotechnology giant pleaded guilty to a charge of misbranding and settled civil charges with the US government for $762 million (look here).  Soon after, New York Times article described the unethical practices the comp...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 23, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: Amgen deception kickbacks stealth health policy advocacy crime revolving doors corporatism adverse effects Source Type: blogs

Lobbying 101 - doing a bundle
Amgen Gets a Gift From Congress For a disheartening example of how intense lobbying and financial contributions can distort the legislative process in Washington, consider what happened to the “fiscal cliff” bill approved three weeks ago by Congress. Senators who play a major role in federal health care financing were happy to help Amgen, the world’s largest biotechnology company, evade Medicare cost-cutting controls by delaying price restraints on a class of drugs used by kidney dialysis patients, including Sensipar, a drug made by Amgen. That provision was inserted into the final fiscal bill by Senate...
Source: PharmaGossip - January 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Business As Usual: Amgen & A Gift From Washington
Here is an old-fashioned episode of horsetrading that suggests the nation’s capital is conducting business as usual, despite concerns about healthcare costs and federal deficits. Last month, language in the so-called fiscal cliff bill allows a delay to Medicare price restraints on a group of medications that will benefit one company, in particular. And that company also contributed generously to several US Senators who influenced the language. Specifically, the bill gives Amgen an extra two years to sell Sensipar, a pill that is used for kidney dialysis and generated $808 million in sales in 2011, without any governm...
Source: Pharmalot - January 22, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Ed Silverman Tags: Uncategorized Amgen Dialysis Medicare Sensipar Source Type: blogs