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Study negates concerns regarding radioactivity in migratory seafood
(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) International research team shows negligible risk from consumption of meat from migratory marine predators following Fukushima nuclear disaster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flexible AC Cool Chain Solutions
Air Canada Cargo provides a range of AC Cool Chain solutions is recommended and used worldwide for air transportation of temperature-sensitive shipments, which typically include fresh produce, seafood, flowers, healthcare, and pharmaceutical products … (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - August 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Can We Feed The World With Farmed Fish?
New research suggests there is space on the open ocean to farm essentially all the seafood humans can eat — and then some. But such volumes of fish and shellfish could not be grown without costs.(Image credit: Maxim Zmeyev/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alastair Bland Source Type: news

A tiny fraction of oceans could satisfy the world's fish demand
(University of California - Los Angeles) Depleted fish stocks and over-fishing could be a thing of the past, according to a UCLA study published Aug. 14, which maps the global potential of sustainable aquaculture and finds that world's seafood needs could be satisfied by a tiny fraction of Earth's ocean -- just 0.025 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Seafood for thought
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Covering 70 percent of Earth's surface, the world's oceans are vast and deep. So vast, in fact, that nearly every coastal country has the potential to meet its own domestic seafood needs through aquaculture. In fact, each country could do so using a tiny fraction of its ocean territory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ask Well: Can You Develop Food Allergies at Any Age?
Preliminary data from a large, new national study suggests that over half of American adults with a food allergy developed it after age 18. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SOPHIE EGAN Tags: Allergies Peanuts Asthma Food Seafood Fruit Pollen Source Type: news

To Help Keep Sturgeon Sustainable, Farm And Fishery Work Together
Because demand for seafood is rising and wild stocks are not, a hatchery owner in Canada is hoping his model of "responsible agriculture" can keep the prized fish both on the menu and in the water.(Image credit: Nancy Matsumoto for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nancy Matsumoto Source Type: news

Health Tip: Packing for a Picnic
-- Picnicking is lots of fun, but nothing can ruin your outdoor meal faster than a nasty case of food poisoning. The Foodsafety.gov website explains how to reduce your risk: Pack any meat, seafood, poultry, sandwiches, summer salads, fruit, veggies... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 4, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Sea shells for sale: A new source of sustainable biomaterials
(Society for Experimental Biology) Over 7 million tonnes of mollusc shells are discarded by the seafood industry each year as unwanted waste -- and the vast majority of these shells are either thrown in landfills or dumped at sea. Dr. James Morris and a team of CACHE researchers from the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences are looking at environmentally and economically sustainable options for these biomaterials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Watford woman ruptures her bladder from dodgy seafood
The unidentified patient, believed to be from Watford, had consumed seafood during dinner out and immediately felt unwell. Her body succumbed to food poisoning. (stock) (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seafood poisoning bug thwarts a key host defense by attacking the cell's cytoskeleton
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) The leading cause of acute gastroenteritis linked to eating raw seafood disarms a key host defense system in a novel way: It paralyzes a cell's skeleton, or cytoskeleton. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists launch global agenda to curb social, human rights abuses in seafood sector
(University of Washington) As the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human rights violations in the seafood industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How To Choose The Safest, Healthiest And Most Sustainable Seafood
By Kristin Canning Your healthy seafood guide Picking out fish should be a simple enough task, right? Unfortunately, it’s not as easy as grabbing a fresh-looking cut or some frozen shrimp and never giving it a second thought. These days we wonder: Does it have mercury? How much? What is its country of origin? Is it being overfished? And a new concern: Am I even getting the right fish? Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Loyola Marymount University recently performed DNA tests on sushi from 26 Los Angeles restaurants and found that 47 percent of it was mislabeled. Yellowfin tuna ended up...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Desperate Gambit That Could Save A Tiny Porpoise From Extinction ... Or Kill It
In 2016, scientists made a distressing announcement: There were fewer than 30 vaquitas ― a tiny porpoise that dwells in Mexico’s Gulf of California ― left in the wild. With carcasses continuing to wash up, researchers worry the vaquita could be extinct by 2018, becoming yet another mammal forced off the face of the Earth.  Losing the porpoise would be a tragedy for Mexico, the World Wildlife Fund said this week ― akin to “losing a piece” of the country, according to Maria Jose Villanueva, a project coordinator for WWF Mexico. But the demise of the vaquita would be a blow to more than...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

These Intestinal Worms Might Be Hiding In Your Sushi, Doctors Warn
By Amanda MacMillan As sushi and other raw seafood dishes become more popular in Western countries, doctors are warning about a dangerous parasite that could be lurking in undercooked fish and squid. Writing in BMJ Case Reports, gastroenterologists in Portugal recount the tale of a 32-year-old patient who was admitted to the hospital with severe stomach pain, vomiting, and a week-long fever. When he mentioned that he’d recently eaten sushi, his doctors suspected anisakiasis — a parasitic disease caused by tiny worms, called nematodes, that attach to the wall of the stomach, esophagus, or intestine. Sure en...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trident Seafoods Corporation Recalls Frozen Multi-Grain Alaskan Cod Due to Possible Health Risk
Trident Seafoods Corporation is issuing a voluntary recall of select lots of frozen Multi-Grain Alaskan Cod, Net Wt. 12, oz., because they may contain small pieces of plastic. Consumption of these products may pose a choking hazard or other physical injury to the mouth. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - May 12, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Parasites could be lurking in your sushi, doctors warn
Anisakiasis, an illness caused by eating parasite-contaminated fish or seafood, is on the rise in Western countries where eating sushi and other raw or undercooked fish and seafood dishes has gained popularity, according to a report published Thursday in BMJ Case Reports. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How The Oceans Became Choked With Plastic
Imagine an area 34 times the size of Manhattan. Now imagine it covered ankle-deep in plastic waste — piles of soda bottles and plastic bags, takeout containers by the mile, drinking straws as far as the eye can see. That’s a total of about 19 billion pounds of garbage. And according to one of the best estimates available, that’s how much plastic waste ends up in our oceans every year. “We’re being overwhelmed by our waste,” said Jenna Jambeck, an environmental engineer who led the 2015 study that determined this staggering number. According to Jambeck’s research, this figure is on...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Oceans Are Drowning In Plastic -- And No One's Paying Attention
Imagine an area 34 times the size of Manhattan. Now imagine it covered ankle-deep in plastic waste — piles of soda bottles and plastic bags, takeout containers by the mile, drinking straws as far as the eye can see. That’s a total of about 19 billion pounds of garbage. And according to one of the best estimates available, that’s how much plastic waste ends up in our oceans every year. “We’re being overwhelmed by our waste,” said Jenna Jambeck, an environmental engineer who led the 2015 study that determined this staggering number. According to Jambeck’s research, this figure is on...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

33 percent of seafood sold in six DC eateries mislabeled, study finds
Scientists used a powerful genetic technique to test seafood dinners sold in six District restaurants and found 33 percent had been mislabeled. The swaps, they found, were mostly with closely related species, say the investigators. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

There's A Right Way To Clean Your Refrigerator
After a long winter of comfort food, baked goods, and takeout, it’s time to lighten up for spring. Begin by clearing out your refrigerator and cabinets to make room for more nutritious options. Make a Fresh Start You know to get rid of moldy, rotten food, but you could probably use a quick primer on storing produce: Whole fruits and vegetables can remain at room temperature for several hours or a day, chopped fruits or veggies need to be refrigerated within two hours of cutting, and cooked vegetables last only three to four days in the fridge. Note that apples should be kept separately, whether in the crisper or on t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anticipating the impact of climate change on Europe's seafood
The EU-funded CERES project is using models to anticipate the impact of climate change on European fisheries and aquaculture. The assessment will feed into industry-driven solutions to secure Europe's seafood supply. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 6, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Workers' compensation claims offer insight into seafood processing injuries in Oregon
(Oregon State University) A review of workers' compensation claims indicates that workers in Oregon's seafood processing industry are suffering serious injuries at higher rates than the statewide average, and the rate of injuries appears to be on the rise, researchers at Oregon State University have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

I Want To Eat Fish Responsibly. But The Seafood Guides Are So Confusing!
All reputable seafood guides are science-based, and yet can offer conflicting advice, because they have different goals. Some support sustainable fishers. Others aim to recover declining populations.(Image credit: intraprese/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Natalie Jacewicz Source Type: news

A Shocking Number Of Deaths May Be Due To Poor Diet
Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes may be due to diet, a new study finds. In 2012, 45 percent of deaths from “cardiometabolic disease” — which includes heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes — were attributable to the foods people ate, according to the study. This conclusion came from a model that the researchers developed that incorporated data from several sources: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which are annual government surveys that provide information on people’s dietary intakes; the National Center for Health Statistics, f...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 8, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Shocking Number Of Deaths May Be Due To Poor Diet
Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes may be due to diet, a new study finds. In 2012, 45 percent of deaths from “cardiometabolic disease” — which includes heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes — were attributable to the foods people ate, according to the study. This conclusion came from a model that the researchers developed that incorporated data from several sources: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which are annual government surveys that provide information on people’s dietary intakes; the National Center for Health Statistics, f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mercury in Fish, Seafood May Be Linked to Increased ALS Risk
There is an important association between eating fish and seafood with higher levels of mercury and being at a higher risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a preliminary study released this week. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - February 21, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Geisel Communications Tags: News ALS Elija Stommel Features mercury neurology seafood Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Lou Gehrig's disease: Mercury in fish, seafood could be risk factor
The risk factors for Lou Gehrig's disease are poorly understood. Breaking research shows that mercury consumed through seafood and fish might play a part. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Mercury in fish, seafood may be linked to higher risk of ALS
(American Academy of Neurology) Eating fish and seafood with higher levels of mercury may be linked to a higher risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. However, fish and seafood consumption as a regular part of the diet was not associated with ALS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study Finds New Bacterial Strain Can Contaminate Shellfish
Scientists studying oysters along the Atlantic Coast have discovered a critical clue to understanding why more seafood lovers are getting sick from eating shellfish. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Tags: Seafood Bacteria Food Contamination and Poisoning New Hampshire Source Type: news

[Policy Forum] U.S. seafood import restriction presents opportunity and risk
On 1 January 2017, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will enact a new rule (1) requiring countries exporting seafood to the United States to demonstrate that their fisheries comply with the U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). The United States is the world's largest seafood importer (2); the MMPA is among the world's strongest marine mammal protection laws; and most of the world's ∼125 marine mammal species are affected by fisheries bycatch (accidental entanglement in fishing gear) (3). This regulation could thus have significant conservation benefits, potentially spilling over to ot...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Rob Williams Tags: Marine Conservation Source Type: news

New US law poised to improve marine conservation worldwide
New restrictions on US seafood imports, which will require seafood to be harvested in accordance with the US Marine Mammal Protection Act, will likely offer significant marine conservation benefits on a global scale. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The White House Just Made It Easier To Know The Fish You're Eating Is Actually Fish
The Obama administration took a massive step in the fight against seafood fraud and illegal fishing on Thursday, introducing a rule that will help Americans know the fish they’re eating is truly what they paid for. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will oversee the Seafood Import Monitoring Program, which will require about 25 percent of imported seafood to be traced from the boat or farm it comes from to the U.S. border. The rule is meant to curb the mislabeling of fish before it enters the U.S. (about 90 percent of fish we consume is imported) and cut down on overfishing. Businesses will...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Royal Seafood Baza, Inc. Recalls Various Ready to Eat Herring Products Because of Possible Health Risk
Royal Seafood Baza, Inc. of Staten, Island, New York is recalling various refrigerated ready to eat herring products because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - December 2, 2016 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Seafood consumption 15 times higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous people
(University of British Columbia) Coastal Indigenous people eat on average 15 times more seafood per person than non-Indigenous people in the same country, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. The findings highlight the need to consider food sovereignty and cultural identity as part of fisheries policy and Indigenous human rights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 2, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Indigenous seafood consumption 15 times higher per capita than national averages
(Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program) Coastal Indigenous people eat, on average, 15 times more seafood per person than non-Indigenous people in the same country, finds a Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program study published today in PLOS ONE. This highlights the need to consider food sovereignty and cultural identity as part of fisheries policy and Indigenous human rights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Handy Seafood Recall: Product Label Missing Milk and Fish Allergen Advisory in Whole Foods Blue Crab Mini Crab Cakes
Salisbury, Maryland - Handy Seafood Incorporated ( “Handy”) is voluntarily recalling approximately 71 cases of Blue Crab Mini Crab Cakes, as identified on Attachment A. The voluntary recall is limited to this product which was distributed to Whole Foods stores in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maine, Connecticut, and Rhode Island between November 11, 2016 and November 23, 2016. Whole Foods has confirmed that less than 60 individual trays of the product have been sold to the public. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - November 24, 2016 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Hundreds Of Dead Puffins Are Mysteriously Washing Ashore In Alaska
The puffins were not supposed to be there. Though the birds are a common sight on the Alaskan island of St. Paul, they typically fly the coop before October, heading south to overwinter. But a few bedraggled birds had been discovered on the wind-swept, rocky shoreline of the North Pacific island during the first week of October. “It was odd because we don’t usually see them here this time of year,” said Aaron Lestenkof, who monitors the local environment as one of St. Paul’s island sentinels.  Stranger still, the puffins didn’t startle and move away when people approached them. Some ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mislabeled seafood may be more sustainable, new study finds
A new study is the first to broadly examine the ecological and financial impacts of seafood mislabeling. The paper finds that in most cases, mislabeling actually leads people to eat more sustainably, because the substituted fish is often more plentiful and of a better conservation status than the fish on the label. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mislabeled seafood may be more sustainable, new study finds
(University of Washington) A University of Washington study is the first to broadly examine the ecological and financial impacts of seafood mislabeling. The paper, published online Nov. 2 in Conservation Letters, finds that in most cases, mislabeling actually leads people to eat more sustainably, because the substituted fish is often more plentiful and of a better conservation status than the fish on the label. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Average American Seafood Intake Increased by a Pound Last Year
The average American consumed 15.5 pounds of seafood last year, nearly a pound more than in 2014, according to a new government report. Average fish consumption has fluctuated in recent decades, but the jump represents the most significant year-over-year increase in more than a quarter century. Researchers attributed the increase at least in part to a spike in consumption of canned fish products, particularly salmon. The research, conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), reports that in total U.S. fishermen brought 9.7 billion pounds of seafood with a value of more than $5 billion to shore l...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - October 26, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

NOAA: Americans added an extra pound of seafood to their diet in 2015
(NOAA Headquarters) 2015 was another above-average year for fishing and seafood consumption, with the average American adding nearly an extra pound of seafood to their diet, according to the annual Fisheries of the United States report released today by NOAA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Thanks To Technology, You Might Soon Know Where Your Seafood Actually Comes From
Millions of people worldwide depend on seafood to survive. An estimated 450 million people get their primary source of food from the ocean, and according to the World Bank, fishing makes up at least 10 percent of the global economy. But for all its popularity and importance, the seafood industry’s supply chain is notoriously opaque, complex and plagued with problems, including illegal fishing and seafood fraud, which can seriously deplete fish populations and harm marine habitats. Seafood lovers often have no idea where their fish or shrimp were caught, and even whether or not their snapper was the real McCoy. Thanks...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Quebec waiter won't be charged for serving salmon to man with seafood allergy
A Sherbrooke, Que., waiter who served salmon tartare to a man with a seafood allergy won't be charged with criminal negligence. Police had previously said the server could be charged. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Montreal Source Type: news

Waiter won't be charged for serving salmon to man with seafood allergy
A Sherbrooke, Que., waiter who served salmon tartare to a man with a seafood allergy won't be charged with criminal negligence. Police had previously said the server could be charged. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Montreal Source Type: news

Seafood fraud is on the rise
The average American eats about 16 pounds of seafood every year, but it turns out many of us aren't getting the fish we ask for. According to research, 20 percent of fish tested is mislabeled. Danielle Nottingham has the story. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Big Sushi Lesson
There are rules when it comes to dining out at an authentic Japanese sushi bar! Recently, I visited a traditional Japanese sushi bar in Vancouver, BC. British Columbia, Canada's westernmost province, is defined by its Pacific coastline and mountain ranges. The sushi bar is owned and operated by a Japanese sushi chef and his wife. When I called for the reservation I was given a list of rules that I had to agree to abide by before the reservation could be confirmed: • You must be on time because we serve only ten people per seating • Plan to be done within 1.5 hours of the seating, no lingering allowed •...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news