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Caitlyn Jenner health: TV personality's stark health warning after cancer scare
CAITLYN JENNER is a retired Olympic gold medal winner and television personality who burst onto our screens on the reality show, Keeping Up with the Kardashians. Caitlyn ’s years of playing sports in the sunshine took a toll on her life. What are the symptoms?
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Healthy Lifestyle, Regular Screening May Keep Cancer at Bay
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - December 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Sports Medicine, Nutrition, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Caitlyn Jenner health: TV personality advises about protection after health scare
CAITLYN JENNER is a retired Olympic gold medal winner and television personality who burst onto our screens on the reality show, Keeping Up with the Kardashians. Caitlyn ’s years of playing sports in the sunshine took a toll on her life. What are the symptoms?
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study shows 3 months of high-intensity exercise can help restore heart function in patients with Type 2 diabetes
(Natural News) Diabetes increases the risk of developing other chronic illnesses, including cardiovascular disease. But in a recent study, scientists from the University of Otago in New Zealand revealed that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) could restore, even reverse, any adverse changes in heart function due to diabetes. The study was published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, an official journal...
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Injury incidence and workloads during congested schedules in football - Howle K, Waterson A, Duffield R.
This study compared injury incidence and training loads between single and multi-match weeks, and seasons with and without congested scheduling. Measures of internal (session-Rating of Perceived Exertion × duration for training/match and % maximal heart r...
Source: SafetyLit - December 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Recreational and Sports Issues Source Type: news

Mammograms May Help Identify Heart Disease, Researchers Say
BOSTON (CBS) — Mammograms are routinely used to screen for breast cancer in women, but there’s mounting evidence that they may also help identify women at risk for heart disease. Mammograms don’t just detect breast tumors, but can also show calcium deposits in the arteries in the breasts, which has been linked to calcium deposits in the arteries in the heart. Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries is strongly associated with heart disease. Researchers at the University of California San Diego looked at nearly 300 women and found that those with calcified breast arteries were more than twice as likely to...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Disease Heart Failure Mammograms Source Type: news

New Details Emerge On Drug That May Slow Alzheimer ’ s Disease
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A company that claims to have the first drug to slow mental decline from Alzheimer’s disease made its case to scientists Thursday, disclosing more results that may help explain why one study of the experimental medicine succeeded and another failed. Excitement and skepticism have surrounded aducanumab since its developers stopped studies earlier this year because it didn’t seem to be working, then did a stunning about-face in October and said new results suggest it was effective, at a high dose. Thursday’s presentation at an Alzheimer’s conference in San Diego convinced some exper...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Aducanumab Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news

Lone Star Ticks Expanding Range Into Northeast, Report Says
(CNN/CBS) — The climate crisis is making us more vulnerable to ticks in an unprecedented and growing threat to public health, according to a new report. Bacterial and protozoan tick-borne diseases doubled in the United States between 2004 and 2016, the report notes, and in 2017, more than 90% of the 60,000 vector-borne diseases in the United States were linked to these particular bloodsucking bugs. The warmer temperatures brought by the climate crisis, in addition to ecological changes and reforestation, have extended the bugs’ range into regions that had not seen certain types of ticks for many decades, if eve...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Lone Star Tick ticks Source Type: news

Concussion in Youth a Suicide Risk Factor? Concussion in Youth a Suicide Risk Factor?
Sports-related concussion in youth is tied to a marked increased risk for subsequent suicide risk factors, including depression, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts, new research shows.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - December 5, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Birth Control Breakthrough At MIT: Once-A-Month Pill Shows Promise
By Eric Cheung, CNN (CNN) — Scientists say they have made a breakthrough on developing a contraceptive pill that only needs to be taken once a month. The star-shaped capsule could help reduce unintended pregnancies that arise from users forgetting to take their daily dose of the pill, according to a news release from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The capsule is coated with gelatin that can remain in the stomach for weeks after being swallowed, the researchers said. From there, it slowly releases hormones to prevent pregnancy. Tests conducted on pigs showed that the capsule could provide the same ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health birth control CNN MIT Source Type: news

1 In 18 Students Attends High School Armed With Gun, Report Says
BOSTON (CBS) – According to a new report published in the journal Pediatrics, 1 in 18 kids goes to high school armed with a gun. Gun-related injury is the second leading cause of death in children and teens, and according to this report, nearly one million teens take a firearm to school. Many kids seem to be driven by fear. The researchers found that high school students who reported feeling threatened were over four times more likely to carry a gun. Eigthy-three percent of the kids carrying guns to school lived in states without universal background checks, and researchers say both state and federal universal background...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Guns Source Type: news

Study: Hair Dye, Chemical Straighteners May Increase Breast Cancer Risk
BOSTON (CBS) — More than a third of women dye their hair and a new study from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) finds that regular use of these chemicals could put women at higher risk of breast cancer. There has been concern that hair dye might promote cancer for some time but the data has been conflicting. In this NIH study, researchers looked at data on more than 46,000 women whose sisters had been diagnosed with breast cancer. They found that those who regularly used permanent hair dye were 9% more likely to develop breast cancer and those who regularly used chemical hair straighteners were 30% more likely ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch News Syndicated CBSN Boston Breast Cancer Dr. Mallika Masrhall Source Type: news

25 Again? How Exercise May Fight Aging
The muscles of those who worked out looked like those of 25-year-olds and showed less of the inflammation that is tied to health problems as we age.
Source: NYT Health - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gretchen Reynolds Tags: Athletics and Sports Exercise Muscles Elderly Age, Chronological Source Type: news

Several Trader Joe ’ s Products Recalled Over Possible Listeria Contamination
BOSTON (CBS/CNN) — Trader Joe’s has announced a voluntary recall of several of its products that may have been contaminated with listeria. So far there are no reports of anyone getting sick, but the company said it is taking the measures as a precaution. Each of the products are packaged in plastic trays with clear lids. The Trader Joe’s brand food items listed in the recall include ready-to-eat meals of California Rolls, Classic California Rolls with Brown Rice & Avocado, Spicy California Rolls, Tempura Shrimp Crunch Rolls, Tofu Spring Rolls, Shrimp Spring Rolls, Smoked Salmon Philly Roll, Smoked Sal...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Consumer Featured Health Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Listeria Recall Trader Joe's Source Type: news

25 Again? How Exercise May Fight Aging
The muscles of those who worked out looked like those of 25-year-olds and showed less of the inflammation that is tied to health problems as we age.
Source: NYT Health - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gretchen Reynolds Tags: Athletics and Sports Exercise Muscles Elderly Age, Chronological Source Type: news

MIT Researchers Develop Treatment That Could Make Passing Kidney Stones Less Painful
CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – A new treatment could help ease the passage of kidney stones, according to researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital. Scientists said this week that muscle relaxants can reduce the contractions that cause pain when passing the stones. About 1 in 10 people will have the painful experience of kidney stones. They cause more than 500,000 emergency room visits in the United States every year. But local researchers think they’ve made a discovery that can help. They say delivering a combination of two muscle relaxants directly to the ureter, the tube that connects the kidneys and bladder, can mak...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Cambridge News Kidney Stones MIT Source Type: news

Depression In Teenagers: Warning Signs Parents Should Watch For
BOSTON (CBS) — Adolescents are moody by nature, so how can parents tell when their child is just being a teen or whether he or she is truly depressed? WBZ-TV’s Dr. Mallika Marshall spoke with Liam Martin about depression in teenagers and what parents should look out for. A new national poll shows parents are worried they might miss the warning signs. Marshall said the preteen and teen years are periods of great changes and it’s a crucial time for adults to watch for red flags. “Rates of depression and anxiety among preteens and teenagers is on the rise and the suicide rate among young people ages 10-24 has also...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Depression Dr. Mallika Marshall Family Focus Parenting Source Type: news

Concussion May Up Risk for Suicide in High School Students
TUESDAY, Dec. 3, 2019 -- High school students with a history of sports-related concussions might be at an increased risk for suicide, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in the Journal of Affective Disorders. Dale S. Mantey, Ph.D., from...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 3, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study: Brushing Your Teeth Regularly May Help Protect Your Heart
BOSTON (CBS) – More evidence that regularly brushing your teeth won’t just freshen your breath, but it may also help protect your heart, according to a study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. Researchers in Korea looked at more than 150,000 adults and found that tooth brushing three or more times a day was associated with a 10-percent lower risk of atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder, and a 12-percent lower risk of heart failure over 10 years. One theory is that frequent brushing reduces bacteria living between the teeth and gums. That prevents it from entering the bloo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Brushing Teeth Dr. Mallika Marshall Heart Disease Source Type: news

Binge Drinking Among Women Is On The Rise, Study Says
BOSTON (CBS) – According to a study from Columbia University, binge drinking is on the rise among almost all adults. And while men on average drink more than women, the largest increase in binge drinking was among women. Binge drinking is consuming more than four alcoholic beverages at one time for women, five at one time for men. Researchers looked at more than 200,000 adults between 2006 and 2018. They found the largest increases in binge drinking among women ages 30-44 without children, doubling from 21-percent back in 2006 to 42-percent in 2018. And while binge drinking among moms rose almost as much, not any mor...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Binge Drinking Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Binge Drinking Among Women Is On The Rise
BOSTON (CBS) – According to a study from Columbia University, binge drinking is on the rise among almost all adults. And while men on average drink more than women, the largest increase in binge drinking was among women. Binge drinking is consuming more than four alcoholic beverages at one time for women, five at one time for men. Researchers looked at more than 200,000 adults between 2006 and 2018. They found the largest increases in binge drinking among women ages 30-44 without children, doubling from 21-percent back in 2006 to 42-percent in 2018. And while binge drinking among moms rose almost as much, not any mor...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Binge Drinking Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

1 In 5 US Adolescents Now Prediabetic, Study Says
(CNN) — Nearly a quarter of young adults and a fifth of adolescents in the United States have prediabetes, according to a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Prediabetes — a condition wherein blood sugar levels are elevated, but not high enough to warrant a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes — was estimated at 18% among adolescents ages 12 to 18, and 24% among young adults ages 19 to 34. Experts say these numbers have risen over the past decade, putting young people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other conditions down the line. “Until recently, young children a...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Diabetes Source Type: news

Just 10 minutes of exercise is all it takes to cut your risk of dying by nearly 20 percent
(Natural News) Being physically active is one of the many things you can do to live a healthy, long life. But how much exercise do you need? A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests that exercising for just 10 minutes every week may help you live longer. The sedentary nature of...
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Consuming energy drinks can jack with your heart's rhythm, increase blood pressure, and perhaps result in sudden cardiac death, warn scientists
(Natural News) Energy drinks tend to conjure up images of athletes in peak health and fitness, training and enjoying a variety of sports, often in the great outdoors. After years of viewing advertisements that promote this narrative, we can be forgiven for believing that energy drinks are a natural part of a healthy lifestyle. Perhaps...
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Tips for healing a sprained ankle fast
An ankle sprain is an injury to ligaments in the ankle. Read on to learn about first aid and long-term methods of supporting recovery.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sports Medicine / Fitness Source Type: news

UMass Medical School Works To Ease Challenge Of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
WORCESTER (CBS) — Caring for a child with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy can be incredibly challenging, but thanks to a local family’s philanthropy and a local medical school’s commitment, treatment is becoming easier for patients and their families. At just over a year old, Diego Ramirez was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, or DMD, a progressive genetic disorder in boys that leads to muscle breakdown. “His muscles felt a little tighter for me, and I felt he was delayed in his development,” said Diego’s mom, Leslie Guzman. Most boys with DMD lose the ability to walk by age 12 and over time, ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Duchenne muscular dystrophy Source Type: news

Ghana: Coconut Water - May Be Useful for Blood Transfusions, Crushes Kidney Stones, Cardioprotective & Fight Cancer
[Ghanaian Times] Coconut water is a popular beverage now in Ghana with huge economic potential. It is dubbed "Mother Nature's sports drink,"according to a WebMed article authored by Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD. Its Low in calories, naturally free of fat and cholesterol, more potassium than four bananas, and super hydrating -- these are just a few of the many benefits ascribed to Ghana's latest health craze: coconut water. No doubt there is a proposal for coconut sellers to wear special uniforms and also contribute to S
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 29, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Reply to Fanton et al.: Comment on "Frequency and magnitude of game-related head impacts in male contact sports athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis" - Willmott C, Nguyen JV, Brennan JH, Mitra B.
This letter refers to the original article available at https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01135-4. Language: en...
Source: SafetyLit - November 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Tufts Medical Center Offers Unique Procedure To Combat Abnormal Heart Rhythm
BOSTON (CBS) — More than six million Americans have an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation. For some people, traditional treatments just don’t work but doctors at a local medical center are using a new procedure to get those patients back in normal rhythm. As the owner of an office cleaning service, 65-year old Pat DeGregorio walks about 10 miles a day, but three years ago, the Winthrop native woke up and could barely move. “I couldn’t breathe,” he said. “I was just gasping for air.” Pat was in an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation or AFib where pacemaker cells in the he...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Atrial Fibrillation Dr. Mallika Marshall Tufts Medical Center Source Type: news

Liberia: 'Ravaging' Ebola Film, Hell's Gate, Premieres Friday
[Observer] Hell's Gate, a feature film about the 2014 Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in Liberia is set to be launched on Friday, November 29, 2019, at Golden Gate Hotel, near SKD Sports Complex.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 28, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Massachusetts Now First State To Ban Flavored Tobacco, Vaping Products
BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts became the first state to ban the sale of flavored tobacco and vaping products, including menthol cigarettes, after the Republican governor signed a bill Wednesday that responds to recent deaths linked to e-cigarettes and attempts to reduce their appeal to young people. Anti-smoking groups hailed the ban signed by Gov. Charlie Baker, which outlaws the sale of flavored vaping products immediately and of menthol cigarettes starting June 1, 2020. Some states have temporarily banned or restricted flavored tobacco or vaping products to different degrees, but Massachusetts is the first state with a ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Consumer Featured Health Politics Syndicated CBSN Boston Vaping vaping ban Source Type: news

Massachusetts Vaping Sales Ban To End Early On December 11
BOSTON (CBS) – The four-month ban on the sale of all vaping products in Massachusetts is ending early, Governor Charlie Baker announced Wednesday. It will now stop Wednesday, December 11th, weeks earlier than expected. “At that time, we expect to put in place new regulations to ensure everyone knows the legitimate health risks that all vaping products pose,” Baker said in a news conference at the State House to discuss the change. The temporary ban, which was approved by the Public Health Council, went into effect September 25 and was orginally scheduled to end January 25, 2020. Before the announcement, Baker sig...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Consumer Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Vaping vaping ban Source Type: news

Partners HealthCare Changing Name To Mass General Brigham
BOSTON (AP) — The largest hospital system in Massachusetts has announced a name change in connection with a five-year strategic plan. The chief executive of Partners HealthCare on Wednesday said the organization will change its name to Mass General Brigham. The name is a nod to Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Partners’ founding members and the organization’s two most notable teaching hospitals. CEO Dr. Anne Klibanski says the rebranding and strategic plan are aimed at creating a more unified health system and strengthening the system’s regional, national and intern...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Business Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Mass General Brigham partners healthcare Source Type: news

Why You Should Add Rest to Your Workout Routine
Most fitness advice urges people to squeeze in more workouts. That’s reasonable, considering government data show that only about a quarter of American adults meet the current guidelines for adequate physical activity: 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity per week, plus two bouts of muscle-strengthening exercise. Meeting these guidelines is important, since getting enough exercise can improve an individual’s physical and mental health. But when it comes to exercise, it is possible to have too much of a good thing. In fact, research suggests taking strategic time off from your worko...
Source: TIME: Health - November 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about muscle soreness
Muscle soreness after exercise can be uncomfortable and disrupt a person ’s fitness routine. Read on for why sore muscles happen plus some treatments and research into their effectiveness.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sports Medicine / Fitness Source Type: news

Loyola launches study on pelvic floor dysfunction in female athletes
(Loyola University Health System) A multidisciplinary team at Loyola Medicine is launching a clinical research study to determine the most prevalent factors impacting young women's pelvic health. The study, which includes a team of researchers in Urogynecology, epidemiology and public health, urology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, sports medicine and biostatistics, will be investigating how sports participation, history of musculoskeletal injury, and other factors correlate with reduced pelvic health in young women.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Problems of homophobia and transphobia in sport
(German Sport University) The diverse field of sport is not free from discrimination. In a sports system characterized by a binary gender order and gender stereotypes, LGBTI* people can feel insecure and sometimes discriminated against. This often prevents them from actively participating in sport. The EU project OUTSPORT presents the findings of the full survey which involved more than 5,500 respondents. It also makes recommendations as to what action organized sport can take.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UPMC to expand services in North Hills
Health system increases capabilities at UPMC Passavant, UPMC Lemieux Sports Complexing and UPMC Cranberry among others.
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 26, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Mom Was Right. Eye Injuries From Paintball And BB Guns Are On The Rise
(CNN) — Nonpowder firearms like BB and paintball guns aren’t typically considered lethal weapons. But as the rate of eye injuries linked to these weapons surges, researchers say it’s time to take these types of guns seriously, too. Between 1990 and 2016, the overall rate of injuries from nonpowder firearms among children declined more than 54%. But the rate of eye injuries, often severe, jumped more than 30%, according to a new study published in Pediatrics. “Nonpowder firearms should be regarded as potentially lethal weapons,” the study’s authors wrote. Researchers combed through statis...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News BB Guns CNN Source Type: news

Water Trapped In Your Ears? Don ’ t Shake Your Head To Get It Out, Researchers Say
BOSTON (CBS) – It happens to all of us. Water gets trapped in our ears after swimming or showering, but researchers at Cornell University and Virginia Tech are now warning that you shouldn’t forcefully shake your head to try to get the water out. The concern is that it could cause brain damage, especially in kids. Scientists took glass tubes of varying diameters to replicate ear canals. They dropped the tubes onto a spring to mimic the shaking strategy. They found that the amount of acceleration needed to eject the water was high enough to potentially cause serious damage to the brain. And since a much greater ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

New Potential Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Being Tested In Canada
BOSTON (CBS) –  Multiple sclerosis affects almost a million Americans and there is still no cure, but researchers in Canada may have discovered a new way to treat the disorder. With MS, it’s believed that the body’s own immune system attacks the nervous system, specifically B-cells which invade the brain and attack the protective covering of nerve cells. Currently there are drugs on the market that can slow the progression by eliminating these cells, but that can lead to serious infections and even cancer. Researchers have now shown that by blocking a certain molecule, they can keep B-cells in the bloodstrea...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Multiple Sclerosis Source Type: news

Concussion and academic impairment among U.S. high school students - Lowry R, Haarbauer-Krupa JK, Breiding MJ, Thigpen S, Rasberry CN, Lee SM.
INTRODUCTION: Sports and physical activities are a frequent cause of traumatic brain injury, primarily concussions, among adolescents. These concussions may adversely affect students' ability to learn and impair academic achievement in educational settings...
Source: SafetyLit - November 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The demographics of fractures and dislocations across the entire United States due to common sports and recreational activities - Meixner C, Loder RT.
BACKGROUND: There exists little nationwide data regarding fracture and dislocation patterns across a wide variety of sporting activities for all ages and sexes. HYPOTHESIS: Participant demographics (age and sex) will vary with regard to fracture and joint ...
Source: SafetyLit - November 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Washing The Thanksgiving Turkey Could Spread Germs, Food Safety Experts Warn
NEW YORK (AP) — Go ahead and rinse your cranberries, potatoes and green beans. But food safety experts say don’t — repeat don’t — wash the turkey before popping it in the oven on Thanksgiving Day. Germs that sicken people can come from all sorts of foods, but a lot of the advice around the country’s biggest eating holiday focuses on how turkeys should be handled. Food safety experts say raw turkeys shouldn’t be washed since that can spread harmful bacteria. Cooking should kill any germs. But bacteria can still spread in other ways, so washing and sanitizing hands and surfaces are still importa...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Consumer Health News Food Safety Thanksgiving Source Type: news

Concussions in high school athletes may be a risk factor for suicide
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Concussion, the most common form of traumatic brain injury, has been linked to an increased risk of depression and suicide in adults. Now new research published by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) suggests high school students with a history of sports-related concussions might be at an increased risk for suicide completion.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Keep moving for better health: Even 10 minutes of vigorous physical activity can help lower death risk
(Natural News) Researchers from the U.S. and China recently revealed that any type of physical activity could reduce overall death risk. The study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found that even 10 minutes of moderate, leisurely activities – like walking and gardening – can reduce the risk of all-cause death. This correlation increased more for...
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dynamics of executive functions, basic psychological needs, impulsivity, and depressive symptoms in American football players - Rinc ón-Campos YE, Sanchez-Lopez J, López-Walle JM, Ortiz-Jiménez X.
Executive functions play an important role in sports since the ability to plan, organize, and regulate behavior to reach an objective or goal depends on these functions. Some of the components of executive functions, such as inhibition of impulsive behavio...
Source: SafetyLit - November 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the benefits of aerobic exercise?
Aerobic exercise reduces the risk of many health conditions. National guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of aerobic activity per week. Here, learn more about the benefits of aerobic exercise on the body and brain.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sports Medicine / Fitness Source Type: news

The Massachusetts Dental Society Shares Flu Season Tips: Prevent the Spread of the Flu and Keep Your Mouth Healthy, Too
SOUTHBOROUGH, Mass..—Nov. 20, 2019—The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported on a call with doctors this week that the United States is seeing more cases of the flu than is typical for this time of year, with30 states already seeing flu activity—including Massachusetts. According to experts, when influenza is off to an early start, it can sometimes mean a more severe flu season.While theCDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most crucial step in protecting against influenza and its potentially serious complications, it ’s also important to take everyday preventive actions to s...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - November 23, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Injury incidence rates and profiles in elite taekwondo during competition and training - Ge ßlein M, Rüther J, Bail HJ, Schuster P, Krutsch W, Wolpert AK.
This study aimed to investigate exposure adjusted injury incidence rates and profiles associated with training and competition in an elite taekwondo athlete population. 82 athletes were investigated for injuries over a period of 5 years. Individual fight t...
Source: SafetyLit - November 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Recreational and Sports Issues Source Type: news