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Happy Family Kitchen: A community-based research for enhancing family communication and well-being in Hong Kong.
Urban families worldwide are often characterized by busy working lives which leave little time for family gatherings and communication. The Happy Family Kitchen project, which emphasized cooking and dining with family members, was conducted in a deprived district in Hong Kong. We hypothesized that the community-based family intervention, derived from a positive psychology framework, can improve family communication, family well-being, and subjective happiness. Twenty-three social service units organized and delivered the intervention programs for 1,419 individuals from 612 families. The core intervention was developed with...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ho, Henry C. Y.; Mui, Moses; Wan, Alice; Ng, Yin-lam; Stewart, Sunita M.; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S. Source Type: research

“It takes two to take”: Caregiving style, relational entitlement, and medication adherence.
Partners ’ support has been associated with both patients’ increased and decreased inclination toward health-promoting behaviors. Our hypothesis for understanding this enigma is that it is the interplay between partners’ manner of care provision and patients’ ability to accept these care efforts that may best predict patients’ adherence. Thus, the current study’s main goal was to examine the contribution of the interaction between caregivers’ support style (sensitive and compulsive) and cardiac patients’ sense of relational entitlement (restricted, excessive, assertive, entitlement expe ctations) to patient...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: George-Levi, Sivan; Vilchinsky, Noa; Tolmacz, Rami; Khaskiaa, Abid; Mosseri, Morris; Hod, Hanoch Source Type: research

Adolescent functioning in housing and family contexts: A mixed methods study.
Although adolescents begin to seek autonomy and strive to be out of the home on their own, the housing context remains the primary setting of their daily lives. Using survey and ethnographic data from Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three City Study (e.g., Winston et al., 1999), this study explored quantitatively and qualitatively how two salient aspects of the housing context, physical housing problems and household size, were associated with low-income adolescents ’ emotional and academic functioning, and how these associations were modified by mother–adolescent relationships (specifically, trust and communication...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elliott, Margaret C.; Shuey, Elizabeth A.; Leventhal, Tama Source Type: research

Low-income, nonresident fathers ’ coparenting with multiple mothers and relatives: Effects on fathering.
Low-income, nonresident fathers are often involved in complex coparenting networks that may involve multiple mothers, relatives, and other adults. However, the coparenting literature has often obscured this complexity through limiting attention to father –mother relationships. The current study used family systems theory to examine the effects of fathers’ coparenting with mothers and relatives on fathers’ parenting self-efficacy, father–child closeness, and father–child conflict. Predictors included the number of fathers’ coparenting mot hers and relatives, the quality of those coparenting relationships, and co...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fagan, Jay; Levine, Ethan Czuy; Kaufman, Rebecca; Hammar, Colin Source Type: research

Families in the context of macroeconomic crises: A systematic review.
Conclusions highlighted the need to assist families dealing with macroeconomic crises’ demands, encouraging the development and validation of macrosystemic intervention programs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fonseca, Gabriela; Cunha, Diana; Crespo, Carla; Relvas, Ana Paula Source Type: research

The effect of daily challenges in children with autism on parents ’ couple problem-solving interactions.
The vulnerability-stress-adaptation model guided this examination of the impact of daily fluctuations in the symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on parents ’ couple problem-solving interactions in natural settings and as these interactions spontaneously occur. A 14-day daily diary was completed by mothers and fathers in 176 families who had a child with ASD. On each day of the diary, parents separately reported on the child with ASD’s daily level o f symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems and the topic and level of negative affect in their most meaningful or ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hartley, Sigan L.; Papp, Lauren M.; Blumenstock, Shari M.; Floyd, Frank; Goetz, Greta L. Source Type: research

Is marriage a buzzkill? A twin study of marital status and alcohol consumption.
Married adults have consistently been found to drink less than their single or divorced counterparts. This correlation may not be causal, however, as people nonrandomly “select” into marriage and into alcohol use. The current study uses a sample of 2,425 same-sex twin pairs (1,703 MZ; 722 DZ) to control for genetic and shared environmental selection, thereby eliminating a great many third variable, alternative explanations to the hypothesis that marriage causes less drinking. Married twins were compared with their single, divorced, and cohabiting cotwins on drinking frequency and quantity. Married cotwins consumed fewe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dinescu, Diana; Turkheimer, Eric; Beam, Christopher R.; Horn, Erin E.; Duncan, Glen; Emery, Robert E. Source Type: research

Reciprocal influences among family processes and toddlers ’ sleep problems.
The current study examined bidirectional relations between children ’s sleep problems and parents’ relationship satisfaction, coparental cooperation, and global family functioning in a sample of 249 families with 2–3-year-old children. Mothers and fathers were assessed across 5 waves with 2-month lags; the target children (53% female) were 2.8 years old (SD = .62) at baseline. Results of lagged path analyses indicated that children’s sleep problems were reciprocally related to lower relationship satisfaction for mothers after accounting for covariates; however, for fathers, only relationship satisfaction predicted ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Peltz, Jack S.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; O ’Connor, Thomas G.; Pigeon, Wilfred R. Source Type: research

Blessing or burden? The role of appraisal for family rituals and flourishing among LGBT adults.
Despite recent trends toward greater societal acceptance of LGBT individuals in many Western countries, the elevated chances of being confronted by rejection and hostility or fear are still likely to lead to detrimental psychological health outcomes for this population. The current study assesses how the family can be a resource for psychological well-being. Based on self-determination theory and the family ritual literature, we hypothesize that the various family rituals enhance the chances that the human need for relatedness will be satisfied and positively contribute to the degree to which the person flourishes in life....
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hanke, Katja; van Egmond, Marieke Christina; Crespo, Carla; Boer, Diana Source Type: research

The association between self-perceived parental role and meaning in life among gay and heterosexual fathers.
The association between self-perceived parental role and meaning in life (indicated by personal growth and purpose in life) was explored among 82 Israeli gay fathers that were individually matched with 82 heterosexual fathers. Self-perceived parental role was associated with meaning in life and this association was moderated by sexual orientation, demonstrating a significant positive association between self-perceived parental role and meaning in life among gay fathers but not among heterosexual fathers. The results are interpreted in light of the unique parental role gay fathers possibly construct in the context of intent...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shenkman, Geva; Shmotkin, Dov Source Type: research

Parental problem drinking and children ’s sleep: The role of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.
We examined relations between mothers ’ and fathers’ problem drinking and school-age children’s sleep. Consistent with a health disparities perspective, children’s ethnicity and socioeconomic status were examined as moderators of relations between parental problem drinking and children’s sleep. Participants were 282 children ( M age = 9.44 years) and their parents. Children were from diverse ethnic (65% White, 35% Black) and socioeconomic backgrounds. Using a multi-informant design, parents reported on their own problem drinking and children’s sleep was assessed with actigraphs over 7 nights. After controlling ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kelly, Ryan J.; El-Sheikh, Mona Source Type: research

Trust: An innovative tool for investigating marital conflict in response to a novel stressor.
The goal of this study was to investigate an innovative approach to elicit marital conflict behaviors in response to a novel stressor. Past research has relied exclusively on assessments of marital conflict that measure reoccurring or past conflict. Couples engaged in 2 interactions: (a) a standardized conflict discussion and (b) the Timed Reconstruction of Unseen Structures Together (TRUST) task, in which couples worked together to solve an unfamiliar problem. Results indicated that the TRUST task was effective at eliciting both positive and negative conflict behaviors and explained unique variance in self-reports of mari...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G.; George, Melissa W.; Quinn-Sparks, Amy R. Source Type: research

Personality and dyadic adjustment: Who you think your partner is really matters.
Research has demonstrated consistently that a broad range of personality traits affect intimate relationship quality; however, most of this research has used only self-ratings of personality. More recently, researchers have acknowledged that how partners perceive one another may also influence intimate relationships. The primary goal of the present study was to determine the predictive utility of partner-ratings of personality above and beyond self-ratings for explaining dyadic adjustment in a community sample of committed heterosexual couples (N = 87). This research was embedded within a Big Three model of personality, us...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brock, Rebecca L.; Dindo, Lilian; Simms, Leonard J.; Clark, Lee Anna Source Type: research

A randomized waitlist-controlled trial of culturally sensitive relationship education for male same-sex couples.
Relationship education, effective in improving relationship quality among different-sex couples, represents a promising and nonstigmatizing approach to promoting the health and stability of same-sex couples. A new culturally sensitive relationship education program was developed specifically for male same-sex couples, which includes adaptations of evidence-based strategies to build core relationship skills (e.g., communication skills training) and newly developed content to address unique challenges faced by this group (e.g., discrimination; low social support). A small randomized waitlist-control trial (N = 20 couples) wa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Whitton, Sarah W.; Weitbrecht, Eliza M.; Kuryluk, Amanda D.; Hutsell, David W. Source Type: research

Family-focused prevention with Latinos: What about sisters and brothers?
Discussion addresses the feasibility of sibling-focused programs with low -income Latino families and makes recommendations for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Uma ña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Rodríguez De Jesús, Sue A.; McHale, Susan M.; Feinberg, Mark F.; Kuo, Sally I-Chun Source Type: research

Optimal assessment of parenting, or how I learned to stop worrying and love reporter disagreement.
The purpose of this study was to examine differences and similarities across ratings of parenting by preadolescents, parents, and observers. Two hundred forty-one preadolescents rated their parents on warmth and harshness. Both mothers and fathers self-reported on these same dimensions, and observers rated each parents ’ warmth and harshness during a 10 min interaction task with the preadolescent. For the majority of outcomes assessed, the differences between preadolescent, parent, and observer ratings accounted for significant amounts of variance, beyond the levels accounted for by the average of their reports. A replic...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Schofield, Thomas J.; Parke, Ross D.; Coltrane, Scott; Weaver, Jennifer M. Source Type: research

Trust, attachment, and mindfulness influence intimacy and disengagement during newlyweds ’ discussions of relationship transgressions.
Discussions of relationship transgressions —violations of relationship norms—are often difficult for couples to successfully navigate. Nevertheless, engaging in and resolving these discussions should promote intimacy. Drawing on the risk regulation model, individuals’ experiences of disengagement and intimacy during transgression discu ssions should depend on their trust in their partner regarding the transgression and how they regulate distress related to lower trust. Attachment style represents individual differences in emotion regulation in close relationship contexts and is indicated by the risk regulation model....
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Khalifian, Chandra E.; Barry, Robin A. Source Type: research

I just want to be left alone: Daily overload and marital behavior.
Stressful, busy days have been linked with increases in angry and withdrawn marital behavior. The process by which stressors in 1 domain, such as work, affect an individual ’s behavior in another domain, such as the marital relationship, is known as spillover. Using 56 days of daily diary reports in a diverse sample of 47 wives and 39 husbands, this study examined associations between daily experiences of overload and 3 marital behaviors: overt expressions of anger, disregard of the spouse’s needs (“disregard”), and reductions in affection and disclosure (“distancing”). Two potential mechanisms by which daily o...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sears, Meredith S.; Repetti, Rena L.; Robles, Theodore F.; Reynolds, Bridget M. Source Type: research

Spanking and child outcomes: Old controversies and new meta-analyses.
This article addresses 2 persistent issues, namely whether effect sizes for spanking are distinct from those for physical abuse, and whether effect sizes for spanking are robust to study design differences. Meta-analyses focused specifically on spanking were conducted on a total of 111 unique effect sizes representing 160,927 children. Thirteen of 17 mean effect sizes were significantly different from zero and all indicated a link between spanking and increased risk for detrimental child outcomes. Effect sizes did not substantially differ between spanking and physical abuse or by study design characteristics. (PsycINFO Dat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 7, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew Source Type: research

Gay grandfathers: Intergenerational relationships and mental health.
This study explored the experiences of 79 gay grandfathers with their adult children and grandchildren. According to family systems theory, intergenerational relationships such as parent –grandparent dyads or parent–child–grandparent triads are important to understanding individual functioning within the family system. Consistent with findings of earlier research on heterosexual grandparents, gay grandfathers reported closer relationships with grandchildren who lived near them and with whom they had frequent contact. In addition, gay grandfathers who reported that they had disclosed their sexual orientation to grandc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tornello, Samantha L.; Patterson, Charlotte J. Source Type: research

Who gives to whom? Testing the support gap hypothesis with naturalistic observations of couple interactions.
We examined sex differences in explicitly supportive behavior exchanges between husbands and wives using naturalistic video-recordings of everyday couple interactions inside the home. Thirty dual-earner, middle class, heterosexual couples with school-age children were recorded in their homes over 4 days. Specific instances of face-to-face explicit couple support in the video-recordings were identified, and the support role assumed by each partner (recipient vs. provider), the method of support initiation (solicitations vs. offers), and the type of support (instrumental vs. emotional) in each interaction were coded. Paired ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wang, Shu-wen; Repetti, Rena L. Source Type: research

Bidirectional associations between bedtime parenting and infant sleep: Parenting quality, parenting practices, and their interaction.
In keeping with transactional conceptualizations of infant sleep development (Sadeh, Tikotzky, & Scher, 2010), the present study was an examination of longitudinal, bidirectional linkages between bedtime parenting (through direct observations of parenting practices and quality) and infant sleep across the first 6 months postpartum. In doing so, we also drew from Darling and Steinberg’s (1993) conceptual model to examine parenting quality as a moderator of linkages between specific bedtime practices and infant sleep. Multilevel model analyses revealed that the strongest increases in infant nighttime sleep across the first...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Philbrook, Lauren E.; Teti, Douglas M. Source Type: research

Financial strain, trajectories of marital processes, and African American newlyweds ’ marital instability.
The present study examined the longitudinal associations among financial strain, trajectories of marital processes, and increases in marital instability concerns among a sample of 280 African American newlywed couples followed over the first 3 years of marriage. Results from dyadic structural equation modeling revealed that financial strain experienced during the early years of marriage was associated with increased marital instability concerns for both husbands and wives. Latent growth curves of marital processes revealed mean declines in appraisals of spousal warmth and increases in appraisals of spousal hostility, with ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barton, Allen W.; Bryant, Chalandra M. Source Type: research

Parents ’ work-family experiences and children’s problem behaviors: The mediating role of the parent–child relationship.
Studies on the impact of work-family dynamics on both parenting and children ’s outcomes are scarce. The present study addressed this gap by exploring how parents’ negative (conflicting) and positive (enriching) experiencing of work and family roles related to children’s internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors through its association with the quality of paren t–child relationships. A sample of 317 dual-earner couples with preschool children was used to conduct a dyadic analysis of both within- and cross-dyad influences of parents’ work-family experiences on child problem behaviors. Our results indicated...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Vieira, Joana M.; Matias, Marisa; Ferreira, Tiago; Lopez, Frederick G.; Matos, Paula Mena Source Type: research

Parents’ work-family experiences and children’s problem behaviors: The mediating role of the parent–child relationship.
Studies on the impact of work-family dynamics on both parenting and children’s outcomes are scarce. The present study addressed this gap by exploring how parents’ negative (conflicting) and positive (enriching) experiencing of work and family roles related to children’s internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors through its association with the quality of parent–child relationships. A sample of 317 dual-earner couples with preschool children was used to conduct a dyadic analysis of both within- and cross-dyad influences of parents’ work-family experiences on child problem behaviors. Our results indicated t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Vieira, Joana M.; Matias, Marisa; Ferreira, Tiago; Lopez, Frederick G.; Matos, Paula Mena Source Type: research

Profiles of cognitive appraisals and triangulation into interparental conflict: Implications for adolescent adjustment.
Youth appraisals and triangulation into conflicts are key mechanisms by which interparental conflict places youth at risk for psychological maladjustment. Although evidence suggests that there are multiple mechanisms at work (e.g., Fosco& Feinberg, 2015; Grych, Harold,& Miles, 2003), this body of work has relied on variable-centered analyses that are limited to the unique contributions of each process to the variance in outcomes. In reality, it is possible that different combinations of these risk mechanisms may account for multifinality in risk outcomes. Using latent profile analysis (LPA) we examined profiles of threat a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fosco, Gregory M.; Bray, Bethany C. Source Type: research

Buffering the responses of avoidantly attached romantic partners in strain test situations.
Strain tests are unique contexts that have important implications for relationships, but they have rarely been studied in social interactions. We investigate how more avoidant individuals (responders) react when their romantic partners (askers) request cooperation with an important plan/goal that requires a major sacrifice from responders. As predicted, more avoidant responders were less accommodating when asked to sacrifice and showed drops in trust and commitment following the strain test discussion. However, certain asker behaviors —expressing confidence that the responding partner will facilitate the request, and ack...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Farrell, Allison K.; Simpson, Jeffry A.; Overall, Nickola C.; Shallcross, Sandra L. Source Type: research

Testing specificity among parents’ depressive symptoms, parenting, and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms.
The present study examined the specificity in relations between observed withdrawn and intrusive parenting behaviors and children’s internalizing and externalizing symptoms in an at-risk sample of children (ages 9 to 15 years old) of parents with a history of depression (N = 180). Given past findings that parental depression and parenting behaviors may differentially impact boys and girls, gender was examined as a moderator of the relations between these factors and child adjustment. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for p...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 15, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gruhn, Meredith A.; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Watson, Kelly H.; Reising, Michelle M.; McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Cole, David A.; Compas, Bruce E. Source Type: research

Single mothers by choice: Mother –child relationships and children’s psychological adjustment.
Fifty-one solo mother families were compared with 52 two-parent families all with a 4 –9-year-old child conceived by donor insemination. Standardized interview, observational and questionnaire measures of maternal wellbeing, mother–child relationships and child adjustment were administered to mothers, children and teachers. There were no differences in parenting quality between f amily types apart from lower mother–child conflict in solo mother families. Neither were there differences in child adjustment. Perceived financial difficulties, child’s gender, and parenting stress were associated with children’s adjust...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Golombok, Susan; Zadeh, Sophie; Imrie, Susan; Smith, Venessa; Freeman, Tabitha Source Type: research

Single mothers by choice: Mother–child relationships and children’s psychological adjustment.
Fifty-one solo mother families were compared with 52 two-parent families all with a 4–9-year-old child conceived by donor insemination. Standardized interview, observational and questionnaire measures of maternal wellbeing, mother–child relationships and child adjustment were administered to mothers, children and teachers. There were no differences in parenting quality between family types apart from lower mother–child conflict in solo mother families. Neither were there differences in child adjustment. Perceived financial difficulties, child’s gender, and parenting stress were associated with children’s adjustme...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Golombok, Susan; Zadeh, Sophie; Imrie, Susan; Smith, Venessa; Freeman, Tabitha Source Type: research

Marital violence and coparenting quality after separation.
Research has identified multiple predictors of coparenting quality, but few studies have investigated how intimate partner violence (IPV) affects divorcing couples’ coparenting relationships. We addressed this question in a sample of 154 mothers with different marital IPV experiences. Mothers were recruited within 4 months of a divorce filing and completed two interviews 3 months apart. At Time 1, mothers reported on violence and coercive control during marriage, and postseparation behavioral (e.g., parental communication), emotional (e.g., anger), and intrusion (e.g., harassment) dynamics; at Time 2, they reported on co...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hardesty, Jennifer L.; Crossman, Kimberly A.; Khaw, Lyndal; Raffaelli, Marcela Source Type: research

Child adjustment and parent functioning: Considering the role of child-driven effects.
Based on 13,694 mother–child dyads from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Kindergarten Study (ECLS-K; Rock & Pollack, 2002; Tourangeau, Nord, Lê, Sorongon, & Najarian, 2009), this study is an examination of the bidirectional relations between parental and child functioning from kindergarten through 3rd grade. Results from the cross-lagged models demonstrated that child-driven effects co-occurred with parental effects, and that these effects were comparable in size. At the same time, however, results from the latent profile analysis (LPA) revealed idiosyncratic patterns of parent and child functioning. Compared with child...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Yan, Ni; Ansari, Arya Source Type: research

Advancing family psychology.
To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge soph...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fiese, Barbara H. Source Type: research

The role of multiple-group measurement invariance in family psychology research.
Measurement invariance (MI) is a property of measurement that is often implicitly assumed, but in many cases, not tested. When the assumption of MI is tested, it generally involves determining if the measurement holds longitudinally or cross-culturally. A growing literature shows that other groupings can, and should, be considered as well. Additionally, it is noted that the standard techniques for investigating MI have been focused almost exclusively on the case of 2 groups, with very little work on the case of more than 2 groups, even though the need for such techniques is apparent in many fields of research. This paper i...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kern, Justin L.; McBride, Brent A.; Laxman, Daniel J.; Dyer, W. Justin; Santos, Rosa M.; Jeans, Laurie M. Source Type: research

Interplay between marital attributions and conflict behavior in predicting depressive symptoms.
Marital attributions—that is, causal inferences and explanations spouses make about their partners’ behavior—have been implicated as predictors of relationship functioning. Extending previous work, we examined marital attributions as a moderator of the link between marital conflict and depressive symptoms 1 year later. Participants were 284 couples who reported on marital attributions and depressive symptoms. Couples also engaged in a videotaped marital conflict interaction, which was later coded for specific conflict behaviors. The results showed that husbands’ and wives’ marital attributions about their partner...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ellison, Jenna K.; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Papp, Lauren M.; Cummings, E. Mark Source Type: research

Daily parental knowledge of youth activities is linked to youth physical symptoms and HPA functioning.
Considerable evidence documents linkages between parental knowledge of youth activities and youth risky behavior. We extended this research to determine whether parental knowledge was associated with youth physical health, including reports of physical symptoms (e.g., headaches, stomachaches) and a biomarker of hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis functioning (i.e., salivary cortisol levels). Participants were children of employees in the Information Technology division of a Fortune 500 company (N = 132, mean age youth = 13.39 years, 55% female) who participated in a daily diary study. Data were collected via t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lippold, Melissa A.; Davis, Kelly D.; McHale, Susan M.; Almeida, David M. Source Type: research

The roles of general and technology-related parenting in managing youth screen time.
This study examines the associations of 2 types of parenting practices —general adaptive parenting and technology-related strategies—with youth screen time. We hypothesized that technology-related parenting focused on behavioral control would relate directly to screen time and serve to link general parenting to screen time. Participants were 615 parents drawn from 3 community samples of families with children across 3 development stages: young childhood (3–7 years; n = 210), middle childhood (8–12 years; n = 200), and adolescents (13–17 years; n = 205). Using structural equation modeling, we found that general ad...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sanders, Wesley; Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Breslend, Nicole Lafko Source Type: research

Perceived family social support buffers against the effects of exposure to rocket attacks on adolescent depression, aggression, and severe violence.
The authors compared the protective effects of 3 sources of perceived social support—from family members, friends, and school personnel—on internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adolescents exposed to rocket attacks. Data were based on 362 Israeli adolescents (median age = 14), chronically exposed to rockets from the Gaza Strip, for whom robust effects of exposure on internalizing and externalizing symptoms were reported during the 2009–2010 period (Henrich & Shahar, 2013). New analyses revealed that perceived family social support assessed in 2009 buffered against the effect of exposure to rocket attacks on dep...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shahar, Golan; Henrich, Christopher C. Source Type: research

Parents ’ experience of flooding in discipline encounters: Associations with discipline and interplay with related factors.
In family psychology, the term flooding refers to the feeling of being overwhelmed by a family member ’s behavior in a manner that undermines an organized response. In the present investigation we first aimed to clarify the role of flooding in overreactive and lax discipline. The second study aim was to more fully establish the position of parental flooding in its nomological network given the rel ative paucity of research on parental flooding. Maternal discipline and physiological responses, as well as child behavior, were observed in laboratory discipline encounters with 97 mother–toddler dyads. Mothers then rated th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lorber, Michael F.; Mitnick, Danielle M.; Slep, Amy M. Smith Source Type: research

Parents’ experience of flooding in discipline encounters: Associations with discipline and interplay with related factors.
In family psychology, the term flooding refers to the feeling of being overwhelmed by a family member’s behavior in a manner that undermines an organized response. In the present investigation we first aimed to clarify the role of flooding in overreactive and lax discipline. The second study aim was to more fully establish the position of parental flooding in its nomological network given the relative paucity of research on parental flooding. Maternal discipline and physiological responses, as well as child behavior, were observed in laboratory discipline encounters with 97 mother–toddler dyads. Mothers then rated the ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lorber, Michael F.; Mitnick, Danielle M.; Slep, Amy M. Smith Source Type: research

Cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD improves various PTSD symptoms and trauma-related cognitions: Results from a randomized controlled trial.
Numerous studies document an association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and impairments in intimate relationship functioning, and there is evidence that PTSD symptoms and associated impairments are improved by cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD (CBCT for PTSD; Monson & Fredman, 2012). The present study investigated changes across treatment in clinician-rated PTSD symptom clusters and patient-rated trauma-related cognitions in a randomized controlled trial comparing CBCT for PTSD with waitlist in a sample of 40 individuals with PTSD and their partners (N = 40; Monson et al., 2012). Compared with ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Macdonald, Alexandra; Pukay-Martin, Nicole D.; Wagner, Anne C.; Fredman, Steffany J.; Monson, Candice M. Source Type: research

The intergenerational continuity of socioeconomic status: Effects of parenting, personality, and age at first romantic partnership.
Research has indicated that socioeconomic status (SES) is related to individual health and well-being, and may be transmitted across generations. According to the interactionist model, circumstances in the family of origin and individual characteristics both account for social, economic, and developmental outcomes associated with SES. Thus, for the present investigation, we evaluated continuities in SES across 2 generations (G1, G2) as mediated through G1 maternal positive parenting, G2 personality, and G2 age of first committed romantic partnership. Participants were 432 emerging adults from an ongoing longitudinal study....
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Senia, Jennifer M.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Lorenz, Frederick O. Source Type: research

Marital satisfaction and maternal depressive symptoms among Korean mothers transitioning to parenthood.
Although many empirical findings support associations between marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms, gaps remain in our understanding of the magnitude and direction of the associations between marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms as well as the associations in a collectivistic culture. The present study examined autoregressive cross-lagged associations between marital satisfaction and maternal depressive symptoms across a 3-year investigation in a sample of Korean mothers transitioning to parenthood. The sample consisted of 2,078 mothers in the Panel Study of Korean Children. The mothers reported marital sat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Choi, Eunsil Source Type: research

The role of siblings in adoption outcomes and experiences from adolescence to emerging adulthood.
We present 3 studies using longitudinal, mixed method data within the same overarching sample of adoptive families. Study 1 was a follow-up to Berge et al.’s (2006) study of adolescent adoptees and their adopted siblings with birth family contact; we found evidence of changes in the status of contact collectively experienced by 26 adopted sibling pairs when target adoptees were emerging adults. In Study 2, we found that target adoptees (n = 91) with siblings (adopted or not) who were more involved with target adoptees’ birth family contact demonstrated more favorable behavioral outcomes than target adoptees who had uni...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Farr, Rachel H.; Flood, Margaux E.; Grotevant, Harold D. Source Type: research

PTSD symptoms and marital adjustment among ex-POWs’ wives.
This study prospectively assessed the implications of war captivity and former prisoners of war’s (ex-POWs) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and PTSD trajectory on their wives’ marital adjustment, adjusting for their secondary traumatization (ST). Results show that marital adjustment of the wives of ex-POWs with PTSD (N = 66) was lower compared to wives of ex-POWs (N = 37) and combat veterans (N = 55) without PTSD symptoms. Investigating the possible mechanism underlying the lower marital adjustment, via a mediating model, indicated that husbands’ PTSD symptoms mediated the association between captivity and the w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Levin, Yafit; Greene, Talya; Solomon, Zahava Source Type: research

Secondary traumatization of partners of war veterans: The role of boundary ambiguity.
The existing literature has shown that war veterans’ posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are associated with a higher level of distress in their female partners. However, less agreement exists regarding the sources of this distress and the mechanism by which this process occurs. The current study examined the consequences of Israeli war veterans’ PTSD on their female partners, as manifested by the females’ PTSD symptoms, mental health status, and functioning, while taking into account females’ earlier traumatic events. Using the theory of ambiguous loss, it also suggested boundary ambiguity as a mediating...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dekel, Rachel; Levinstein, Yoav; Siegel, Alana; Fridkin, Shimon; Svetlitzky, Vlad Source Type: research

Changes in parents ’ spanking and reading as mechanisms for Head Start impacts on children.
This study examined whether Head Start, the nation ’s main two-generation program for low-income families, benefits children in part through positive changes in parents’ use of spanking and reading to children. Data were drawn from the 3-year-old cohort of the national evaluation of the Head Start program known as the Head Start Impact Study (N = 2,063). Results indicated that Head Start had small, indirect effects on children’s spelling ability at Age 4 and their aggression at Age 4 through an increase in parents’ reading to their children. Taken together, the results suggest that parents play a role in sustaining...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ansari, Arya; Purtell, Kelly M.; Sexton, Holly R. Source Type: research

Changes in parents’ spanking and reading as mechanisms for Head Start impacts on children.
This study examined whether Head Start, the nation’s main two-generation program for low-income families, benefits children in part through positive changes in parents’ use of spanking and reading to children. Data were drawn from the 3-year-old cohort of the national evaluation of the Head Start program known as the Head Start Impact Study (N = 2,063). Results indicated that Head Start had small, indirect effects on children’s spelling ability at Age 4 and their aggression at Age 4 through an increase in parents’ reading to their children. Taken together, the results suggest that parents play a role in sustaining ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ansari, Arya; Purtell, Kelly M.; Sexton, Holly R. Source Type: research

Direct and indirect effects of commitment on interdependence and satisfaction in married couples.
This study tested the prediction that an individual’s marital commitment would be positively associated with their own and their partner’s marital satisfaction, and that one’s own marital interdependence would be associated with one’s own marital satisfaction. It also tested the prediction that there would be an indirect effect of marital commitment on marital satisfaction through higher marital interdependence for both the individual and the partner. Predictions were tested on 628 married couples. Overall, results were consistent with predictions. Tests of actor–partner interdependence mediation models revealed ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Givertz, Michelle; Segrin, Chris; Woszidlo, Alesia Source Type: research

The salience and severity of relationship problems among low-income couples.
Developing programs to support low-income married couples requires an accurate understanding of the challenges they face. To address this question, we assessed the salience and severity of relationship problems by asking 862 Black, White, and Latino newlywed spouses (N = 431 couples) living in low-income neighborhoods to (a) free list their 3 biggest sources of disagreement in the marriage, and (b) rate the severity of the problems appearing on a standard relationship problem inventory. Comparing the 2 sources of information revealed that, although relational problems (e.g., communication and moods) were rated as severe on...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jackson, Grace L.; Trail, Thomas E.; Kennedy, David P.; Williamson, Hannah C.; Bradbury, Thomas N.; Karney, Benjamin R. Source Type: research