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Parenting in poverty: Attention bias and anxiety interact to predict parents ’ perceptions of daily parenting hassles.
This study extends a growing literature on neurocognitive models of parenting by exploring the extent to which attention processes in parents operate independently and interactively with intrapsychic processes, proximal interpersonal stressors, and the larger socioeconomic context to predict perc eptions of parenting hassles in primarily low-income Latino/a parents of young children living in urban areas of concentrated disadvantage (N = 185). Analyses indicated that parent reports of anxiety, intimate partner violence, and perceptions of financial hardship each uniquely predicted parents’ perceptions of daily parenting ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Finegood, Eric D.; Raver, C. Cybele; DeJoseph, Meriah L.; Blair, Clancy Source Type: research

Maternal executive function, heart rate, and EEG alpha reactivity interact in the prediction of harsh parenting.
Do physiological and behavioral performance indicators of effortful cognitive self-regulation converge additively or interactively in their statistical prediction of individual differences in harsh parenting? To answer this question, we examined heart rate (HR) and electroencephalography alpha ( α) reactivity during executive function (EF) tasks, along with observed and self-reported indicators of harsh parenting. A socioeconomically diverse sample of 115 mothers with 3- to 7-year-old children completed questionnaires and a laboratory visit. Three quarters of the mothers showed typical pat terns of task reactivity that we...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Bell, Martha Ann Source Type: research

Introduction to the special section: Mind and matter: New insights on the role of parental cognitive and neurobiological functioning in process models of parenting.
This is an introduction to the special section on neurobiological and neurocognitive factors in parenting. The collection of 11 papers are published in 2 serial subsections of consecutive issues of the journal. The science they present captures the leading edge of work examining the interface of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physiological self-regulation in parenting and how these operate to protect or increment risk for poorer parenting among families who face chronic stressors (e.g., poverty, single parenthood, homelessness, mood disorders). Samples span the poor to the affluent, many ethnicities, several nationa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L. Source Type: research

Family psychology and the psychology of men and masculinities.
This article was invited to mark the 30th anniversary of the Journal of Family Psychology, which is also the 125th anniversary of APA publications. I served as the second Editor of the journal, from 1992 to 1997. I reflect on some of the similarities and differences between the journal ’s mission statements from 1992 and 2016, and then discuss my intellectual evolution from family psychologist to psychologist of men and masculinities, pointing out opportunities for collaboration. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Levant, Ronald F. Source Type: research

Introduction to three decades of family psychology: Perspectives toward the future.
This article introduces the 30th anniversary of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP). In addition it marks the 125th anniversary of publications by the American Psychological Association. In recognition of this milestone the editorial team has invited the past editors of the journal to write brief reflections on the field and commenting on their vision for the future of the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fiese, Barbara H. Source Type: research

Executive function and parenting in the context of homelessness.
There is mounting evidence that maternal executive function (EF) plays a critical role in parenting behavior. However, the majority of the research on this topic has been conducted in low-risk samples. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether individual differences in maternal EF are associated with parenting behavior in the high-risk, high adversity context of family homelessness. The study included 94 mothers and their children, ages 4 to 6 years, living in emergency homeless shelters. Mothers completed a battery of “hot” and “cool” EF tasks as well as a self-report questionnaire of perceived s...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Monn, Amy R.; Narayan, Angela J.; Kalstabakken, Amanda W.; Schubert, Erin C.; Masten, Ann S. Source Type: research

The psychophysiology of parenting: Individual differences in autonomic reactivity to positive and negative mood inductions and observed parental affect during dyadic interactions with children.
Parenting is a complex activity driven, in part, by parental emotional and physiological responses. However, work examining the physiological underpinnings of parenting behavior is still in its infancy, and very few studies have examined such processes beyond early childhood. The current study examines associations between Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) indices of parents ’ physiological reactivity to positive and negative mood states and observed parental affect during a series of discussion tasks with their adolescent child. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) was measured as an index of parasympathetic nervous system (...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 19, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Connell, Arin M.; Dawson, Glen C.; Danzo, Sarah; McKillop, Hannah N. Source Type: research

Child neglect and maternal cross-relational social cognitive and neurocognitive disturbances.
This study focused on highly disadvantaged mothers of preschoolers and compared mothers with histories of perpetrating child neglect (n = 69) to demogra phically similar mothers without such histories (n = 76). Participants completed measures of unrealistic expectations for children and other adults, social problem-solving in parenting and nonparenting situations, executive functioning (EF), and attributions for children and other adults. As predict ed, associations among these measures were found within and across relational domains. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two distinct clusters that distinguished the two gro...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Azar, Sandra T.; McGuier, Devin J.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Hernandez-Mekonnen, Robin; Johnson, David R. Source Type: research

Maternal executive functioning as a mechanism in the intergenerational transmission of parenting: Preliminary evidence.
Multiple lines of inquiry, including experimental animal models, have recently converged to suggest that executive functioning (EF) may be one mechanism by which parenting behavior is transmitted across generations. In the current investigation, we empirically test this notion by examining relations between maternal EF and parenting behaviors during mother-infant interactions, and by examining the role of maternal EF in the intergenerational transmission of parenting behavior. Mother-infant dyads (N = 150) in a longitudinal study participated. Mothers were administered measures of EF (working memory and inhibition), report...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bridgett, David J.; Kanya, Meghan J.; Rutherford, Helena J. V.; Mayes, Linda C. Source Type: research

Enhancing relationship quality measurement: The development of the Relationship Flourishing Scale.
This study evaluates the development of the Relationship Flourishing Scale, a 12-item measure of eudaimonic relationship quality that assesses meaning, personal growth, relational giving, and goal sharing. The study supports the construct validity of the Relationship Flourishing Scale, including its content, concurrent, convergent, discriminant, and incremental validity. Its incremental validity and independence suggest that it provides information about deeper and richer aspects of relationship quality than do current hedonic relationship quality measures. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Sour...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 5, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fowers, Blaine J.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Penfield, Randall D.; Cohen, Laura M.; Lang, Samantha F.; Owenz, Meghan B.; Pasipandoya, Elizabeth Source Type: research

Social support and coparenting among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents.
In this study, we examined associations between qualities of families ’ social contexts and experiences of coparenting. In a sample of 92 adoptive families, we assessed perceived social support among 23 lesbian, 28 gay, and 41 heterosexual adoptive parent families and its association with parents’ perceptions of their coparenting alliances. Results showed that par ents in same- and other-sex couples reported receiving similar amounts of social support from family, friends, and significant others. Perceived social support was positively associated with stronger coparenting alliance among all family types. Perceived supp...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 6, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sumontha, Jason; Farr, Rachel H.; Patterson, Charlotte J. Source Type: research

Positive family relationships: Longitudinal network of relations.
The construct of positive family relationships (PFR), defined as family members getting along well and supporting each other, was investigated in a long-term prospective study. A newly constructed scale of positive family relationships developed using the nominal response model of item-response theory, was subject to a longitudinal network of relations analysis. The conceptualization for this research was founded on a positive psychology framework. Data derived from the Fullerton Longitudinal Study and spanned 20 years from middle childhood (age 9 years) to early adulthood (age 29 years). Evidence indicated both stability ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 3, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Preston, Kathleen S. J.; Gottfried, Allen W.; Oliver, Pamella H.; Gottfried, Adele Eskeles; Delany, Danielle E.; Ibrahim, Sirena M. Source Type: research

Relationship satisfaction, PTSD symptom severity, and mental healthcare utilization among OEF/OIF veterans.
Despite the availability of evidence-based PTSD treatments at most facilities within the VA Healthcare System, most Iraq and Afghanistan veterans returning from deployments with posttraumatic stress symptoms do not receive an adequate dose of mental health treatment, prompting the need to identify potential barriers to or facilitators of mental health care utilization. Previous research demonstrated self-reported mental health care utilization in the prior year varies as a function of PTSD symptom severity, and the interaction of PTSD symptom severity and romantic relationship satisfaction (Meis et al., 2010). We extended ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 26, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: McGinn, Meghan M.; Hoerster, Katherine D.; Stryczek, Krysttel C.; Malte, Carol A.; Jakupcak, Matthew Source Type: research

Parenting self-efficacy moderates linkage between partner relationship dissatisfaction and avoidant infant –mother attachment: A Dutch study.
The early infant –mother attachment relationship is part of a network of close relationships in which the relationship between parents is especially relevant. Evidence for linkages between maternal satisfaction with the partner relationship and infant–mother attachment is equivocal. The current study tested whet her associations between partner relationship dissatisfaction and infant–mother attachment quality might be conditional on mothers’ parenting self-efficacy. The bivariate effect of partner relationship dissatisfaction on infant–mother attachment as well as moderation of this effect by parentin g self-effi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 15, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cass é, Julie F. H.; Oosterman, Mirjam; Schuengel, Carlo Source Type: research

Family rituals, financial burden, and mothers ’ adjustment in pediatric cancer.
In this study, we aimed to determine if family ritual meaning moderates the relationship between financial burden and anxiety and depression symptoms among mothers of children with cancer. Portuguese mothers of children with cancer on-treatment and off-treatment (N = 244) completed measures of financial burden, anxiety and depression symptoms, and family ritual meaning. Moderating effects were tested using hierarchical multiple regression analyses. Family ritual meaning buffered the effect of financial burden on anxiety, but not on depression symptoms. The relationship between financial burden and anxiety symptoms was not ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 12, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M. Cristina; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Kazak, Anne E. Source Type: research

The complex contribution of sociodemographics to decision-making power in gay male couples.
Relationship power is an important dyadic construct in close relationships that is associated with relationship health and partner ’s individual health. Understanding what predicts power in heterosexual couples has proven difficult, and even less is known about gay couples. Resource models of power posit that demographic characteristics associated with social status (e.g., age, income) confer power within the relationship, wh ich in turn shapes relationship outcomes. We tested this model in a sample of gay male couples (N = 566 couples) and extended it by examining race and HIV status. Multilevel modeling was used to tes...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Perry, Nicholas S.; Huebner, David M.; Baucom, Brian R. W.; Hoff, Colleen C. Source Type: research

Newlyweds ’ perceptions of partner conflict behaviors and change in intimate safety over time.
This study is the first to test a key hypothesis of the behaviora l conceptualization of intimacy, and findings are generally consistent with the theory. This line of research has important implications for couple interventions, which often target intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 1, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: LaMotte, Adam D.; Khalifian, Chandra E.; Barry, Robin A. Source Type: research

Parental insightfulness is associated with cooperative interactions in families with toddlers.
A growing body of research has highlighted the importance of mother –father–child interactions in families with toddlers, but little is known about the internal processes underlying parenting in such interactions. Dyadic studies of parent–child relationships have focused on parental insightfulness as promoting sensitive parent–child interactions, and the goa l of the present study was to examine whether insightfulness would similarly be associated with cooperative triadic interactions. To address this question, we observed 77 mother–father–toddler triads in the Lausanne Trilogue Play (LTP) procedure to assess f...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marcu, Inbal; Oppenheim, David; Koren-Karie, Nina Source Type: research

Cortisol response to family interaction as a predictor for adjustment.
Emerging adult (EA) cortisol response during family interaction predicts change in EA anxious behavior during the transition to college (Johnson& Gans, in press). In the present study, we take an initial step toward integrating family systems research and physiology by including assessment of EA salivary cortisol collected during a triadic (mother –father–EA offspring) family interaction task. Emerging adults (N = 101) between the ages of 17 and 19 were assessed at 3 time points across their first college year: the summer before college, Fall and Spring semesters. Two parents accompanied the emerging adult child to the...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 25, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gans, Susan E.; Johnson, Vanessa Kahen Source Type: research

Genetic moderation of transactional relations between parenting practices and child self-regulation.
The present study addressed the ways in which parent and child dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) genotypes jointly moderate the transactional relations between parenting practices and child self-regulation. African American children (N = 309) and their parents provided longitudinal data spanning child ages 11 to 15 years and a saliva sample from which variation at DRD4 was genotyped. Based on the differential susceptibility perspective, this study examined moderation effects of DRD4 status on (a) the extent to which parenting practices affect child self-regulation and (b) the extent to which child self-regulation, as an environm...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 22, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cho, Junhan; Kogan, Steven M.; Brody, Gene H. Source Type: research

Parent cortisol and family relatedness predict anxious behavior in emerging adults.
Emerging-adult cortisol response during family interaction predicts change in emerging-adult anxious behavior during the transition to college (Gans& Johnson, in press). In the present study, we take an additional step toward integrating family systems research and physiology by including assessment of parent physiology. We collect salivary cortisol from parents and emerging adults during triadic family interaction. Emerging adults (N = 101) between the ages of 17 and 19 years were assessed at 3 time points across their first college year: the summer before college and the Fall and Spring semesters. Two parents accompanied...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Johnson, Vanessa Kahen; Gans, Susan E. Source Type: research

Maternal anxiety and physiological reactivity as mechanisms to explain overprotective primiparous parenting behaviors.
In this study, we sought to determine whether the affective and physiological experience of primiparous, or first-time, motherhood is distinct from multiparous motherhood, how the child ’s level of inhibited temperament impacts it, and if such a temperament results in overprotective parenting behaviors. A total of 117 mothers and their 24-month-old toddlers participated in novelty tasks designed to elicit parenting behaviors and toddler’s typical fear reactions. Mothers also co mpleted a battery of questionnaires. Results suggest that primiparous mothers experienced more worry, which was associated with increased overp...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kalomiris, Anne E.; Kiel, Elizabeth J. Source Type: research

Happy Family Kitchen: A community-based research for enhancing family communication and well-being in Hong Kong.
Urban families worldwide are often characterized by busy working lives which leave little time for family gatherings and communication. The Happy Family Kitchen project, which emphasized cooking and dining with family members, was conducted in a deprived district in Hong Kong. We hypothesized that the community-based family intervention, derived from a positive psychology framework, can improve family communication, family well-being, and subjective happiness. Twenty-three social service units organized and delivered the intervention programs for 1,419 individuals from 612 families. The core intervention was developed with...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ho, Henry C. Y.; Mui, Moses; Wan, Alice; Ng, Yin-lam; Stewart, Sunita M.; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S. Source Type: research

“It takes two to take”: Caregiving style, relational entitlement, and medication adherence.
Partners ’ support has been associated with both patients’ increased and decreased inclination toward health-promoting behaviors. Our hypothesis for understanding this enigma is that it is the interplay between partners’ manner of care provision and patients’ ability to accept these care efforts that may best predict patients’ adherence. Thus, the current study’s main goal was to examine the contribution of the interaction between caregivers’ support style (sensitive and compulsive) and cardiac patients’ sense of relational entitlement (restricted, excessive, assertive, entitlement expe ctations) to patient...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: George-Levi, Sivan; Vilchinsky, Noa; Tolmacz, Rami; Khaskiaa, Abid; Mosseri, Morris; Hod, Hanoch Source Type: research

Adolescent functioning in housing and family contexts: A mixed methods study.
Although adolescents begin to seek autonomy and strive to be out of the home on their own, the housing context remains the primary setting of their daily lives. Using survey and ethnographic data from Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three City Study (e.g., Winston et al., 1999), this study explored quantitatively and qualitatively how two salient aspects of the housing context, physical housing problems and household size, were associated with low-income adolescents ’ emotional and academic functioning, and how these associations were modified by mother–adolescent relationships (specifically, trust and communication...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elliott, Margaret C.; Shuey, Elizabeth A.; Leventhal, Tama Source Type: research

Low-income, nonresident fathers ’ coparenting with multiple mothers and relatives: Effects on fathering.
Low-income, nonresident fathers are often involved in complex coparenting networks that may involve multiple mothers, relatives, and other adults. However, the coparenting literature has often obscured this complexity through limiting attention to father –mother relationships. The current study used family systems theory to examine the effects of fathers’ coparenting with mothers and relatives on fathers’ parenting self-efficacy, father–child closeness, and father–child conflict. Predictors included the number of fathers’ coparenting mot hers and relatives, the quality of those coparenting relationships, and co...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fagan, Jay; Levine, Ethan Czuy; Kaufman, Rebecca; Hammar, Colin Source Type: research

Daily patterns of stress and conflict in couples: Associations with marital aggression and family-of-origin aggression.
This study used both partners’ daily diary data to examine same-day and cross-day links between stress and marital conflict and tested several factors that make couples vulnerable to spillover. Assessment of 25 wide-ranging sources of dail y stress included both paid and unpaid work, health issues, financial concerns, and having to make difficult decisions. Results showed that both husbands’ and wives’ experiences of total daily stress were associated with greater same-day marital conflict and that conflict was greater on days bot h spouses experienced high levels of stress. Evidence of cross-day spillover was found ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Timmons, Adela C.; Arbel, Reout; Margolin, Gayla Source Type: research

Mexican-origin parents ’ differential treatment and siblings’ adjustment from adolescence to young adulthood.
Parents ’ differential treatment is a common family dynamic that has been linked to youth’s well-being in childhood and adolescence in European American families. Much less is known, however, about this family process in other ethnic groups. The authors examined the longitudinal associations between par ents’ differential treatment (PDT) and both depressive symptoms and risky behaviors of Mexican-origin sibling pairs from early adolescence through young adulthood. They also tested the moderating roles of cultural orientations as well as youth age, gender and sibling dyad gender constellation in t hese associations. P...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Padilla, Jenny; McHale, Susan M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Uma ña-Taylor, Adriana J. Source Type: research

Randomized trial of parent training to prevent adolescent problem behaviors during the high school transition.
This randomized controlled trial tested a widely used general parent training program, Common Sense Parenting (CSP), with low-income 8th graders and their families to support a positive transition to high school. The program was tested in its original 6-session format and in a modified format (CSP-Plus), which added 2 sessions that included adolescents. Over 2 annual cohorts, 321 families were enrolled and randomly assigned to either the CSP, CSP-Plus, or minimal-contact control condition. Pretest, posttest, 1-year follow-up, and 2-year follow-up survey data on parenting as well as youth school bonding, social skills, and ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mason, W. Alex; Fleming, Charles B.; Gross, Thomas J.; Thompson, Ronald W.; Parra, Gilbert R.; Haggerty, Kevin P.; Snyder, James J. Source Type: research

Parents behaving badly: Gender biases in the perception of parental alienating behaviors.
This study examined how mothers ’ and fathers’ behaviors that support or discourage a positive relationship with the other parent are perceived in terms of their acceptability. Two-hundred twenty-eight parents completed an online survey assessing perceptions of acceptability of negative (parental alienating) and positive copar enting behaviors. Results provided support for our hypothesis: Although parental alienating behaviors were rated unacceptable, they were more acceptable for mothers than fathers. Expectancy violation theory can explain why parental alienating behaviors are not viewed as negatively when mothers ex...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Harman, Jennifer J.; Biringen, Zeynep; Ratajack, Ellen M.; Outland, Pearl L.; Kraus, Allyson Source Type: research

Families in the context of macroeconomic crises: A systematic review.
Conclusions highlighted the need to assist families dealing with macroeconomic crises’ demands, encouraging the development and validation of macrosystemic intervention programs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 8, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fonseca, Gabriela; Cunha, Diana; Crespo, Carla; Relvas, Ana Paula Source Type: research

Gender-typed behavior over time in children with lesbian, gay, and heterosexual parents.
The current longitudinal study examined patterns and predictors of parent-reported gender-typed play behavior in adopted boys and girls in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual 2-parent families, across early childhood (Mage = 2.82 to 6.06 years). Specifically, using a sample of 181 couples (56 lesbian couples, 48 gay male couples, and 77 heterosexual couples), we examined parent reports of children ’s gender-typed play behavior on the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI; Golombok& Rust, 1993) at 3 time points (mean age = 2.82 years at T1, 3.93 years at T2, and 6.06 years at T3). Family structure variables (i.e., parents ’ ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Goldberg, Abbie E.; Garcia, Randi L. Source Type: research

The rested relationship: Sleep benefits marital evaluations.
Remaining satisfied with a relationship often requires thinking in ways that use self-regulatory resources —satisfied couples discount undesirable experiences when forming global evaluations of the relationship. Nevertheless, recent work indicates that the self-regulatory resources required to engage in these processes are limited. Although consuming new energy may be one way to replenish these limited resources, sleep is another. The current study used a daily diary study of 68 newlywed couples to examine the implications of sleep for daily marital evaluations. Every day for up to 7 days, both members of the couples rep...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Maranges, Heather M.; McNulty, James K. Source Type: research

The effect of daily challenges in children with autism on parents ’ couple problem-solving interactions.
The vulnerability-stress-adaptation model guided this examination of the impact of daily fluctuations in the symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on parents ’ couple problem-solving interactions in natural settings and as these interactions spontaneously occur. A 14-day daily diary was completed by mothers and fathers in 176 families who had a child with ASD. On each day of the diary, parents separately reported on the child with ASD’s daily level o f symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems and the topic and level of negative affect in their most meaningful or ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hartley, Sigan L.; Papp, Lauren M.; Blumenstock, Shari M.; Floyd, Frank; Goetz, Greta L. Source Type: research

Is marriage a buzzkill? A twin study of marital status and alcohol consumption.
Married adults have consistently been found to drink less than their single or divorced counterparts. This correlation may not be causal, however, as people nonrandomly “select” into marriage and into alcohol use. The current study uses a sample of 2,425 same-sex twin pairs (1,703 MZ; 722 DZ) to control for genetic and shared environmental selection, thereby eliminating a great many third variable, alternative explanations to the hypothesis that marriage causes less drinking. Married twins were compared with their single, divorced, and cohabiting cotwins on drinking frequency and quantity. Married cotwins consumed fewe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dinescu, Diana; Turkheimer, Eric; Beam, Christopher R.; Horn, Erin E.; Duncan, Glen; Emery, Robert E. Source Type: research

Reciprocal influences among family processes and toddlers ’ sleep problems.
The current study examined bidirectional relations between children ’s sleep problems and parents’ relationship satisfaction, coparental cooperation, and global family functioning in a sample of 249 families with 2–3-year-old children. Mothers and fathers were assessed across 5 waves with 2-month lags; the target children (53% female) were 2.8 years old (SD = .62) at baseline. Results of lagged path analyses indicated that children’s sleep problems were reciprocally related to lower relationship satisfaction for mothers after accounting for covariates; however, for fathers, only relationship satisfaction predicted ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 30, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Peltz, Jack S.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; O ’Connor, Thomas G.; Pigeon, Wilfred R. Source Type: research

Longitudinal associations between relationship quality and coparenting across the transition to parenthood: A dyadic perspective.
The couple and coparenting relationship are theorized to influence each other in a reciprocal manner over time. Empirical evidence demonstrates cross-sectional associations between the 2 as well as prospective predictions of coparenting by relationship quality and vice versa. However, less is known about the longitudinal reciprocity between the couple relationship and coparenting from the perspective of both parents. The current study sought to examine longitudinal associations between relationship quality and coparenting support/undermining across the transition to parenthood from a dyadic perspective. Participants were 1...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Le, Yunying; McDaniel, Brandon T.; Leavitt, Chelom E.; Feinberg, Mark E. Source Type: research

Fathers ’ postnatal distress, parenting self-efficacy, later parenting behavior, and children’s emotional-behavioral functioning: A longitudinal study.
Fathers ’ postnatal distress has been associated with subsequent emotional and behavioral problems for children; however, the mechanisms by which this occurs have received less attention. One potential pathway could be via the negative effects that father mental health problems and parenting self-efficacy (PSE) in the postnatal period have on later parenting behaviors. Using a nationally representative cohort of Australian father–child dyads (N = 3,741), the long-term relationships between fathers’ psychological distress and PSE in the postnatal period, parenting behavior when children were aged 4–5 years, and emot...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 16, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rominov, Holly; Giallo, Rebecca; Whelan, Thomas A. Source Type: research

Blessing or burden? The role of appraisal for family rituals and flourishing among LGBT adults.
Despite recent trends toward greater societal acceptance of LGBT individuals in many Western countries, the elevated chances of being confronted by rejection and hostility or fear are still likely to lead to detrimental psychological health outcomes for this population. The current study assesses how the family can be a resource for psychological well-being. Based on self-determination theory and the family ritual literature, we hypothesize that the various family rituals enhance the chances that the human need for relatedness will be satisfied and positively contribute to the degree to which the person flourishes in life....
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 9, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hanke, Katja; van Egmond, Marieke Christina; Crespo, Carla; Boer, Diana Source Type: research

Social skills deficits as a mediator between PTSD symptoms and intimate partner aggression in returning veterans.
This study examined social skills deficits as a mediator of the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and use of intimate partner aggression (IPA) among returning veterans. Prior research with veterans has focused on PTSD-related deficits at the decoding stage of McFall ’s (1982) social information processing model, and the current study adds to this literature by examining social skills deficits at the decision stage. Participants were 92 male veterans recruited from the greater Boston area. PTSD symptoms were assessed through clinician interview, IPA use was as sessed through self- and part...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: LaMotte, Adam D.; Taft, Casey T.; Weatherill, Robin P.; Eckhardt, Christopher I. Source Type: research

A micro-developmental view of parental well-being in families coping with chronic illness.
We examined daily, microdevelopmental processes by modeling the associations between adolescents ’ daily problems and emotional experiences in managing Type 1 diabetes and changes in parental negative and positive affect surrounding the illness. Using a daily diary method, 161 mothers (M age = 40 years), fathers (M age = 42 years), and early adolescents (M age = 12.4 years) rated their negati ve and positive emotions surrounding diabetes for 14 days. Adolescents reported, via a checklist, the number of problems they experienced in managing diabetes each day. Using dynamical systems modeling, we found that adolescents’ ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Queen, Tara L.; Butner, Jonathan; Wiebe, Deborah J.; Berg, Cynthia A. Source Type: research

Romantic relationship transitions and changes in health among rural, White young adults.
A growing body of research examines how the presence and quality of romantic relationships, from dating to marriage, contribute to health. However, this work oftentimes fails to consider instability in the relationship supports and stressors thought to affect health. This is particularly important during the transition to adulthood when instability in romantic relationships is expected to be common. Barr, Culatta, and Simons (2013) put forth a new model that has shown promise for assessing the degree of this instability and its implications for young adult health. They tested their model, however, with an African American ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barr, Ashley B.; Sutton, Tara E.; Simons, Leslie Gordon; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Lorenz, Frederick O. Source Type: research

Improved child problem behavior enhances the parents ’ relationship quality: A randomized trial.
Although a large body of literature indicates that interparental discord is a primary risk factor for child maladjustment, less research has examined children ’s behavior as a predictor of the parents’ relationship quality. The goal of this randomized trial intervention study was to examine the effects of improved problem behavior in children on the parents’ relationship quality 1 year later in a community sample. One hundred couples were randomly a ssigned to (a) a parenting training (Triple P) or (b) an untreated control group. Interparental relationship quality, parenting behavior, and child problem behavior were ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Zemp, Martina; Milek, Anne; Davies, Patrick T.; Bodenmann, Guy Source Type: research

The association between self-perceived parental role and meaning in life among gay and heterosexual fathers.
The association between self-perceived parental role and meaning in life (indicated by personal growth and purpose in life) was explored among 82 Israeli gay fathers that were individually matched with 82 heterosexual fathers. Self-perceived parental role was associated with meaning in life and this association was moderated by sexual orientation, demonstrating a significant positive association between self-perceived parental role and meaning in life among gay fathers but not among heterosexual fathers. The results are interpreted in light of the unique parental role gay fathers possibly construct in the context of intent...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shenkman, Geva; Shmotkin, Dov Source Type: research

Parental problem drinking and children ’s sleep: The role of ethnicity and socioeconomic status.
We examined relations between mothers ’ and fathers’ problem drinking and school-age children’s sleep. Consistent with a health disparities perspective, children’s ethnicity and socioeconomic status were examined as moderators of relations between parental problem drinking and children’s sleep. Participants were 282 children ( M age = 9.44 years) and their parents. Children were from diverse ethnic (65% White, 35% Black) and socioeconomic backgrounds. Using a multi-informant design, parents reported on their own problem drinking and children’s sleep was assessed with actigraphs over 7 nights. After controlling ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kelly, Ryan J.; El-Sheikh, Mona Source Type: research

Trust: An innovative tool for investigating marital conflict in response to a novel stressor.
The goal of this study was to investigate an innovative approach to elicit marital conflict behaviors in response to a novel stressor. Past research has relied exclusively on assessments of marital conflict that measure reoccurring or past conflict. Couples engaged in 2 interactions: (a) a standardized conflict discussion and (b) the Timed Reconstruction of Unseen Structures Together (TRUST) task, in which couples worked together to solve an unfamiliar problem. Results indicated that the TRUST task was effective at eliciting both positive and negative conflict behaviors and explained unique variance in self-reports of mari...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G.; George, Melissa W.; Quinn-Sparks, Amy R. Source Type: research

Personality and dyadic adjustment: Who you think your partner is really matters.
Research has demonstrated consistently that a broad range of personality traits affect intimate relationship quality; however, most of this research has used only self-ratings of personality. More recently, researchers have acknowledged that how partners perceive one another may also influence intimate relationships. The primary goal of the present study was to determine the predictive utility of partner-ratings of personality above and beyond self-ratings for explaining dyadic adjustment in a community sample of committed heterosexual couples (N = 87). This research was embedded within a Big Three model of personality, us...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brock, Rebecca L.; Dindo, Lilian; Simms, Leonard J.; Clark, Lee Anna Source Type: research

A randomized waitlist-controlled trial of culturally sensitive relationship education for male same-sex couples.
Relationship education, effective in improving relationship quality among different-sex couples, represents a promising and nonstigmatizing approach to promoting the health and stability of same-sex couples. A new culturally sensitive relationship education program was developed specifically for male same-sex couples, which includes adaptations of evidence-based strategies to build core relationship skills (e.g., communication skills training) and newly developed content to address unique challenges faced by this group (e.g., discrimination; low social support). A small randomized waitlist-control trial (N = 20 couples) wa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 18, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Whitton, Sarah W.; Weitbrecht, Eliza M.; Kuryluk, Amanda D.; Hutsell, David W. Source Type: research

Using reinforcement sensitivity to understand longitudinal links between PTSD and relationship adjustment.
There is limited research testing longitudinal models of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity leads to impaired relationship adjustment. The present study evaluated 2 potential mechanisms among a longitudinal sample of National Guard soldiers deployed to the Iraq War: (1) sensitivity to cues associated with punishment within intimate relationships and (2) sensitivity to cues associated with incentives in intimate relationships. Participants were surveyed by mail 1 year after an extended 16-month combat deployment and again 2 years later. Using a cross-lagged panel analysis with 2 mediators (relationship-specif...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Meis, Laura A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Kramer, Mark D.; Arbisi, Paul A.; Kehle-Forbes, Shannon M.; DeGarmo, David S.; Shallcross, Sandra L.; Polusny, Melissa A. Source Type: research

The longitudinal association of relationship satisfaction and sexual satisfaction in long-term relationships.
Several prominent models of relationship satisfaction and sexual satisfaction imply directional relationships between these constructs (e.g., attachment theory, social exchange models of relationship satisfaction, the interpersonal exchange model of sexual satisfaction). Previous research has demonstrated that sexual satisfaction and relationship satisfaction are distinct but correlated constructs, but relatively few studies have examined how they are related over time. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine this association. A sample of heterosexual couples (N = 113) completed a longitudinal study spanning 2 years...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fallis, Erin E.; Rehman, Uzma S.; Woody, Erik Z.; Purdon, Christine Source Type: research