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Total 30619 results found since Jan 2013.

Arthritis and tomatoes: Why are tomatoes bad for arthritis? Truth exposed
TOMATOES AND ARTHRITIS don't mix, apparently. Why are tomatoes bad for arthritis?
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Interrogator, Therapist, Nurse: What it Takes to be a Coronavirus Contact Tracer
(SALT LAKE CITY) — Health investigator Mackenzie Bray smiles and chuckles as she chats by phone with a retired Utah man who just tested positive for the coronavirus. She’s trying to keep the mood light because she needs to find out where he’s been and who he’s been around for the past seven days. She gently peppers him with questions, including where he and his wife stopped to buy flowers on a visit to a cemetery. She encourages him to go through his bank statement to see if it reminds him of any store visits he made. Read more: Here’s How Quickly Coronavirus Is Spreading in Your State Midway...
Source: TIME: Health - May 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Brady Mccombs / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

Kenya: Boy, 6, May Have Exposed Many to COVID-19, Doctors Say
[Nation] The six-year-old boy who died at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) may have exposed dozens of people to the coronavirus.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 5, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

‘ Very Scary Time ’ : Mom Of Boy With Lung Condition Urges Social Distancing
CANTON (CBS) – Little 5-year-old Nelson is ready for a long day of treatment at the hospital. His brand new mask – made just for him, by a kind Canton neighbor. “The responses I got were overwhelming,” said mom Evelyn Rue, who’d posted to Facebook asking for help. “I had people dropping them off, asking if we needed more. It was amazing.” Evelyn has been dreading these upcoming appointments. The monthly, two-day treatments are essential to slow the progression of Nelson’s lung condition Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome. But leaving the house feels scary right now. “I m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Canton News Coronavirus Juli McDonald Source Type: news

Concussion PSA Compares Youth Football Dangers To Smoking
BOSTON (AP) — Everybody seems to be having fun when the kids in a new public service announcement are just playing football, until one boy is thrown to the ground and the background music turns ominous. Then, the coach starts handing out cigarettes. “Tackle football is like smoking,” a youthful voice-over says as a smiling, motherly type lights a cigarette for one of the pre-teen players. “The younger I start, the longer I’m exposed to danger.” “Tackle Can Wait ” is part of a campaign by the Boston-based Concussion Legacy Foundation to steer children under 14 years old into flag ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Concussion Legacy Foundation Concussions Youth Football Source Type: news

Too much cleanliness not bad for health, report on hygiene says
Royal Society for Public Health says need to expose children to germs is ‘dangerous myth’The notion that too much cleanliness can be bad for your health and that children need to be exposed to germs is a dangerous myth, according to a public health body.The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) said the hygiene hypothesis – that allergies are caused by too much cleanliness, by killing off the bugs we need to challenge our immune systems – has entered the public imagination and is being misinterpreted.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Hygiene UK news Science London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Health Society Source Type: news

A 5-Year-Old Boy Is the First to Die of Ebola in Uganda as Outbreak Crosses Congo Border
(KASINDI, Congo) — A 5-year-old boy vomiting blood became the first cross-border victim of Ebola in the current outbreak on Wednesday, while two more people in Uganda tested positive for the highly contagious disease that has killed nearly 1,400 in Congo. The boy, part of a Congolese family who crossed into Uganda earlier in the week, died overnight, the World Health Organization said. Ugandan authorities said the two new cases are his 3-year-old brother and 50-year-old grandmother, who have been isolated at a hospital near the border. Uganda now has three confirmed Ebola cases. Authorities tried to determine how the...
Source: TIME: Health - June 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RODNEY MUHUMUZA and AL-HADJI KUDRA MALIRO / AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease ebola Infectious Disease onetime Uganda Source Type: news

Safety is Third, Not First, and We All Know It Should Be
Conclusion In educational opportunities, train like you plan to fight. Since there may not be an actual patient, the “benefit” in the risk-benefit analysis may be lesser. However, taking no risks in training ensures you’ll be less prepared to take risks—even R+ risks—in actual operations. For example, you don’t stop patient care because it’s raining, so don’t stop your training simply because it’s raining. Also, during your education, fight the idea that we can ever say “the scene is safe.” Accept that our work is done in an imperfect environment where safety cannot be ensured. Then, recognize that yo...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - November 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher Davis, MD, NRP, FAWM Tags: Exclusive Articles Operations Source Type: news

Freddie Mercury Didn ’t Want to Be a ‘Poster Boy’ for AIDS — But He and Other Celebrities Played a Key Role in Its History
In the new biopic about Freddie Mercury — Bohemian Rhapsody, in theaters Friday — the Queen lead singer (played by Rami Malek) has one request when he tells his bandmates about his HIV diagnosis: that they keep the news private, because he doesn’t want to be a “poster boy” for AIDS or a “cautionary tale.” While Mercury is remembered more for his music than for anything, his health status did in fact become public just days before he died of complications of AIDS-related pneumonia on Nov. 24, 1991, at the age of 45. And in fact, even if the timeline of his diagnosis in real life doe...
Source: TIME: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized health movies Music Source Type: news

Boy Survives After Meat Skewer Pierces Skull
HARRISONVILLE, Mo. (AP) — A 10-year-old Missouri boy is recovering after he was attacked by insects and tumbled from a tree, landing on a meat skewer that penetrated his skull from his face to the back of his head. But miraculously, that's where Xavier Cunningham's bad luck ended. The skewer had completely missed Xavier's eye, brain, spinal cord and major blood vessels, The Kansas City Star reports . Xavier's harrowing experience began Saturday afternoon when yellow jackets attacked him in a tree house at his home in Harrisonville, about 35 miles (56 kilometers) south of Kansas City. He fell to the ground and started to ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Trauma News Source Type: news

Can Bad Men Change? What It ’s Like Inside Sex Offender Therapy
The men file in, a few wearing pressed button-down shirts, others jeans caked in mud from work on a construction site. They meet in the living room of an old taupe bungalow on a leafy street in a small Southern city. Someone has shoved a workout bike into the corner to make room for a circle of overstuffed chairs dug up at the local Goodwill. The men jockey for a coveted recliner and settle in. They are complaining about co-workers and debating the relative merits of various trucks when a faint beeping interrupts the conversation. One man picks up a throw pillow and tries to muffle the sound of the battery running low on h...
Source: TIME: Health - May 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman Tags: Uncategorized nation sex offender therapy Source Type: news

‘My Worst Nightmare.’ 8-Year-Old Boy Dies of Flesh-Eating Bacteria After Falling From Bike
An 8-year-old boy died after a fall off his bicycle led him to contract a flesh eating disease. Doctors said they believe Liam contracted the case of necrotizing fasciitis, from his wound touching dirt when he fell, People Magazine reported. They attempted to control the infection, which ended up stretching from his ankle to his armpit, by removing patches of the infection from his tissue, according to the report. “The pain was so bad that he was screaming. It’s horrific. It is a horrific torture, that’s what it is. The last things I got to hear from my son was him screaming because it hurt so bad,”...
Source: TIME: Health - January 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized health healthytime onetime Source Type: news

‘My Worst Nightmare.’ 8-Year-Old Boy Dies From Flesh-Eating Bacteria After Falling From Bike
An 8-year-old boy died after a fall off his bicycle led him to contract a flesh eating disease. Doctors said they believe Liam contracted the case of necrotizing fasciitis, from his wound touching dirt when he fell, People Magazine reported. They attempted to control the infection, which ended up stretching from his ankle to his armpit, by removing patches of the infection from his tissue, according to the report. “The pain was so bad that he was screaming. It’s horrific. It is a horrific torture, that’s what it is. The last things I got to hear from my son was him screaming because it hurt so bad,”...
Source: TIME: Health - January 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized health healthytime onetime Source Type: news

A boy ’s basketball-size tumor is slowly suffocating him. Doctors will attempt a risky removal.
Noel Zayas paraded his son to a never-ending carousel of Cuban doctors, but none of them would touch the boy. Emanuel Zayas’s basketball-size facial tumor was too complex, they told his family. The surgery to remove it too risky. “I knocked on a lot of hospital doors,” Zayas told the Miami Herald. “To see our son […]Related:Why this may be a bad flu season, especially around the holidaysWhat’s the most embarrassing way you’ve ever injured yourself?Someone stole a child’s parcel off his porch. It contained his kidney transplant medication.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Resistance to Antibiotics: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Antimicrobial drugs play a critical role in the treatment of diseases, their use is essential to protect both human and animal health. However, antimicrobials are often misused for treatment and prevention of diseases in livestock sector, aquaculture as well as crop production. Credit: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Dec 6 2017 (IPS)The growing resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobials due to their overuse and misuse both in humans and animals has become an alarming global threat to public health, food safety and security, causing the deaths of 700,000 people each year. This is a fact. The good news is that now more and mo...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs Projects Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Improving the lives of ru Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Stress Bad For Gut, Walking Can Help You Live Longer
BOSTON (CBS) – There’s growing evidence that your gut health is closely tied to your overall health. In fact, bacteria and other organisms that live in your gut may affect your weight, your immune system, even your risk of disease. Now a new study finds that stress can be as bad for your gut as junk food. Researchers found that mice who were exposed to stress had gut bacteria that resembled those of mice fed a high-fat diet, but only in female mice. We all get stressed from time to time, some more than others, and this is more evidence that stress doesn’t just affect our psychological health, but that it ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Walking Source Type: news

The Genius of Manolo Blahnik Is on Full Display in The Boy Who Made Shoes for Lizards
Beautiful shoes are often treated as a frivolity, for obvious reasons. No one ever really needs a pair of jeweled green peau de soie pumps with a 10cm heel. But then, need doesn’t always figure into the vagaries of human desire. Which is why human beings—and not always just women—covet the shoes made by maestro Manolo Blahnik. You may not be able to afford the shoes, but Michael Roberts’ documentary Manolo: The Boy Who Made Shoes for Lizards may bring you almost as much delight. Here’s a doc with a spring in its step, intimate without being off-puttingly reverential. Roberts, erstwhile fashion...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephanie Zacharek Tags: Uncategorized Documentary fashion manolo blank manolo: the boy who made shoes for lizards michael roberts movies Source Type: news

The Health Care Vote Further Exposed A GOP Empathy Gap
Thursday’s vote on the American Health Care Act (AHCA) that passed by a four-vote margin in the U.S. House of Representatives further exposed a growing empathy gap between the majority of House Republicans and the tangible realities of their constituents. The bill would strip at least 24 million people of their health insurance. The ACHA also “turns Medicaid into a block grant, enabling states to kick otherwise-eligible people off their coverage and cut benefits if I choose… and slashes Medicaid overall by $880 billion over 10 years,” according to the Washington Post’s Paul Waldman. It would ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The World Is Not Ready for the Next Pandemic
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news

The High Cost of Bad Moods (Barry Goldberg On Leadership)
Research in behavioral science is showing that there is a trend toward higher irritability in the workplace — especially in the United States — and it has been more pronounced over the last 24 months. In short, more of us spend more time in a bad mood at work than ever before. There are even healthy, if snarky, internet memes on the subject. In one, the comic strip character Calvin howls, “I’m in a very bad mood, so nobody’d better mess with me today, boy!!” Bad moods are generally the result of higher stress, lower satisfaction, elevated levels of fear (even if we do not have something ...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - April 24, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Moms Exposed To Monsanto Weed Killer Means Bad Outcomes For Babies
Concerns about the world’s most widely used herbicide are taking a new twist as researchers unveil data that indicates pervasive use of Monsanto Co.’s weed killer could be linked to pregnancy problems. Researchers looking at exposure to the herbicide known as glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup-branded herbicides, said they tested and tracked 69 expectant mothers and found that the presence of glyphosate levels in their bodily fluids correlated with unfavorable birth outcomes. The research is still in preliminary stages and the sample size is small, but the team is scheduled to present th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Family Of Boy Struggling After Heart Transplant Now Losing Home
BOSTON (CBS) — The family of a little boy who is fighting to survive after a heart transplant recently got some more bad news after an already rough year – they found out their home will have to be torn down due to a mold infestation. Five-year-old Ari “Danger” Schultz, who had a congenital heart defect, received a new heart earlier this month at Boston Children’s Hospital after waiting 211 days. But the family is facing new challenges, and says they need help now more than ever. It started with Ari fighting acute rejection after his transplant. “Ari is struggling mightily,” fath...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Ari Schultz Heart Transplant Schultz family Source Type: news

One Bad Doctor: Richard Johns Pill Mill Scheme Leads to Death of One, Ensnares Dozens
Curtis Norris had made some bad decisions. He dropped out of Cabot High School and his work history was spotty. But, as far as his mother knew, he didn’t have a real drug problem before he hooked up with Marissa Scroggins months before he died. Brenda Birmingham thought Marissa was another of Curt’s bad decisions, but you don’t tell a 25-year-old man whom he can spend his time with. Besides, Curt loved Marissa’s toddler and sometimes referred to the boy as “my son”; now Birmingham wishes he really were her grandson. Birmingham can’t remember exactly how long her son was involved wi...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - March 13, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Adorable Little Boy Loses Race Because He Wanted To Hug His Dad
A photo of a 2-year-old Nigerian boy is going viral after he lost a race for an absolutely adorable reason. On Tuesday, Imoh Umoren tweeted a photo of his toddler son, Imoh Umoren II. “My son finished 4th in the race because instead of running across the finish line he ran to hug me,” he wrote. “Ah well won my heart.” My son finished 4th in the race because instead of running across the finish line he ran to hug me. Ah well won my heart pic.twitter.com/ww99o0qfSV— Imoh Umoren (@ImohUmoren) February 21, 2017 The tweet received over 11,000 likes and 6,400 retweets. Umoren is an indie f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Newborn screening and gene therapy save baby from ‘bubble boy’ disease
Levi with his Dad, Phillip, and Colton with his mom, Kala (photo by Amie Van Amberg) Happy to have given birth in January 2015 to two seemingly healthy boys, Levi and Colton, after an uneventful pregnancy, Kala Looks gave little thought to the routine heel prick of newborn screening. At 23 and 24, she and her husband, Phillip, were high school sweethearts starting a family. Two weeks later, a Michigan state health official called. Something came up on Levi’s screen. You need to bring him in right away. Three weeks and numerous blood draws later, the Looks had a diagnosis: Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) — ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 30, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation bubble boy disease Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Dr. Sung-Yun Pai gene therapy SCID severe combined immune deficiency stem cell transplant Source Type: news

Changing Bad Sleep Habits
Huffington Post is proud to partner with American Sleep Association (ASA) to promote sleep awareness. Did you ever notice that when you're exhausted, small problems can seem ever bigger? That's because, in addition to having a shorter fuse, lack of sleep can also affect your ability to solve problems. Poor sleep can also lead to a variety of other issues from increasing your risk of accidents to being overweight. It's clear getting enough sleep is a critical factor in maintaining good health. Shooting for seven to nine hours of sleep each night is optimal for most adults. But sometimes we might sabotage our sleep with ce...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'It's scary': Tests confirm Winnipeg baby exposed to carfentanil, police say
Test results confirm that a nine-month-old WInnipeg boy hospitalized in October was exposed to carfentanil, an opioid 100 times stronger than fentanyl, police say.
Source: CBC | Health - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

Boy Celebrates 8th Birthday With Emotional Tribute To Fallen Officer Father
On March 22, 2011, Senior Police Officer Buddy Christian was shot and killed while responding to an attack on a fellow officer. The 34-year-old Georgia cop left behind a wife, Melissa, daughter, Callie, and son, Wyatt. To honor his father’s legacy, Wyatt celebrated his eighth birthday this October with a special remembrance photo shoot. Photographer Mary Lee took pictures of Wyatt with some of his father’s belongings, like his badge, hat and boots ― as well as the folded American flag the family received at Buddy’s funeral. Melissa told The Huffington Post that remembrance photo shoots h...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

It may not be a boy when dad ’s been exposed to dioxin
(Reuters Health) - Men exposed to dioxin, a chemical once common in herbicides, may be less likely to father boys than peers who didn ’t come in contact with this toxin, a recent study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Caustic agent ingestion by a 1.5-year-old boy - Gharib B, Mohammadpour M, Yaghmaie B, Sharifzadeh M, Mehdizadeh M, Zamani F, Edalatkhah R, Mohsenipour R.
We present a case of caustic ingestion by a 1.5-year-old boy. The caustic agent was drain opener which is a strong alkaline substance. Children in Iran and many other countries are still exposed to not "child proof" (child resistant packaging) toxic substa...
Source: SafetyLit - July 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

9 Bad Habits You Must Break to Be More Productive
Nothing sabotages your productivity quite like bad habits. They are insidious, creeping up on you slowly until you don't even notice the damage they're causing. Bad habits slow you down, decrease your accuracy, make you less creative, and stifle your performance. Getting control of your bad habits is critical, and not just for productivity's sake. "By constant self-discipline and self-control you can develop greatness of character." -Grenville Kleiser Some bad habits cause more trouble than others, and the nine that follow are the worst offenders. Shedding these habits will increase your productivity and allow you to en...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baby Boy To Leave Brigham And Women’s NICU On Mother’s Day
BOSTON (CBS) — Monica Shook says she and her husband Doug have a lot to be thankful for this Mother’s Day. Their son, William, has been a gift no words can describe. He was born prematurely at 29 weeks, weighing only 3 pounds. William Shook was born prematurely and has spent the past three months in the NICU at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. (WBZ-TV) For the past three months, William has been fighting for his life in the neonatal intensive-care unit at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “Everyone always says the NICU is a roller coaster and it is,” Shook told WBZ. “You have good days, bad days ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mouellette2015 Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Brigham and Women's Hospital NICU Paul Burton Premature Birth Source Type: news

'Transformational managers' may be bad for workplace health
Conclusion This study shows that a popular leadership style called transformational leadership may increase employee sick days, but this depends on employees' existing tendencies to show up to work when they're ill. Those who tended to show up to work ill the most were also those most likely to be off sick more when a transformational leader was installed. The researchers' theory was that those more likely to come into work when they're ill don't have a chance to recover from work and illness fully, leading to more sickness in the long term. However, this study has a number of limitations to be aware of. Those reporting...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Mental health Source Type: news

10 Strategies for Managing the Day After a Bad Night's Sleep
Most everybody has experienced at least a night or two of poor sleep. And many millions of us do so on a regular basis. A bad night's sleep can leave us feeling anxious about making it through the next day. Will we have the energy, the focus, and the emotional wherewithal to do so? Is it even possible to have a good day after a bad night? Yes, it is. I've frequently been surprised by people reporting okay days after seriously sleepless nights. In large part, this is a testament to the human capacity for resilience. But it's also a direct result of using sensible strategies to manage the day after. 1. Adjust your attitude. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kaleb’s journey: Treating C-diff with fecal microbiota transplantation
Bath time and bubbles, snuggling with Mom and playing hockey with his big brother are just a few of Kaleb’s favorite things. But for the bright-eyed three-year-old from Massachusetts, things weren’t always so carefree. Kaleb’s health changes: Battling ear infections and diarrhea As an infant, Kaleb was a healthy baby boy. He was eating well and growing by leaps and bounds. At six months, his health began to change. Multiple ear infections followed by numerous antibiotic treatments became a painful part of Kaleb’s young life. As his first birthday approached, a second, unrelated condition emerged. Bouts of diarrhea ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 27, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: All posts Diseases & conditions Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) fecal transplant gastroenterology George Russell Mark Volk Poop pill Source Type: news

Mom Writes Viral Note To Boy Who Saw Her Son With Disability Like Any Other Kid
One mother was deeply moved when she witnessed a boy's interaction with her young son.  When Katie Myers' son, Kaden, was 7 months old, he was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy, a disease that causes his muscles to get progressively weaker. Now 1, Kaden, who needs a wheelchair to get around, has trouble with certain movements, Myers told The Huffington Post. So during a recent trip to the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium in West Palm Beach, Kaden had some difficulty playing at one of the interactive exhibits. But one thoughtful boy came over and helped the 1-year-old out, assisting him with the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Boy Scouts Are Poised to End Ban on Gay Leaders
The Boy Scouts of America is poised to change its long-divisive stance, while leaving room for some scouting groups to restrict leadership jobs.
Source: NYT Health - July 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ERIK ECKHOLM Tags: Boy Scouts Mormons (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) Intel Corporation INTC NASDAQ United Parcel Service Inc UPS NYSE Roman Catholic Church Discrimination gay ban Homosexuality and Bisexuality Gates, Robert M Source Type: news

Meet Ryan: The boy who grew his own esophagus
Dr. Rusty Jennings, Ryan Page, Dr. John Foker Eleven-year-old Ryan Page is a budding trombone player whose favorite foods include candy, popcorn and hot dogs. “Ryan loves any choking hazard,” jokes his mother Tracy. When Ryan was born, few would have predicted he would be able tolerate these foods or master the trombone. “His doctors told us he had the longest gap they had ever seen in a baby with esophageal atresia,” recalls Tracy. Ryan was born with a nearly 4-inch gap between the top and bottom parts of his esophagus. “This is a kid whose predestination based on standard therapy was chronic aspiration (breathi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 17, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our patients’ stories Advanced Fetal Care Center Dr. John Foker Dr. Rusty Jennings esophageal atresia Esophageal Atresia Treatment Center G-tube Source Type: news

Good News and Bad News for Antibiotics
Every credible medical and health organization, including the American Medical Association, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the World Health Organization, has said if we don't significantly reduce antibiotic use in people and agriculture, we will soon live in a world where these drugs no longer work. This frightening prospect of unwinding nearly a century of progress against bacterial infections frames three recent announcements - one good, one mostly good and one bad. Quite simply, overuse of antibiotics is killing us. All organisms have the capacity to evolve in the face of biological thre...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Born with “bubble boy” disease, 4-year-old has normal life after gene therapy
Seated in an exam room on the sixth floor of Boston Children’s Hospital, Sung-Yun Pai, MD, speaks mother-to-mother—not doctor to patient’s mother—with Marcela Caceres, who has just asked whether she should take extra precautions if her 4-year-old son Agustin is exposed to chickenpox. The answer is no. “I’m a mother too, and a good mother also knows when to back off,” Pai tells her. “It’s important for him to have a normal life.” “It’s hard for me to really accept that that’s the case,” Caceres says, “but I’m working on it.” If Caceres has trouble shedding her instinct to over-protect, it...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 11, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Cancer Our patients’ stories Source Type: news

I-Team: State Now Tracking ‘Substance Exposed Newborns’
BOSTON (CBS) – The scope of the heroin and opiate epidemic continues to plague the state every day. Governor Charlie Baker is making the crisis a priority for his new administration. Some in the medical community say that can’t happen fast enough, as they’re treating a growing number of innocent victims: newborn babies. “It is awful, they get right into your heart,” said Dr. Brigid McCue, director of OB-GYN at Beth Israel Deaconess in Plymouth. “Over the last few months, we are seeing an uptick. We have seen seven in the last six months, which I think is probably double for us.” Dr. Alan Picaril...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health i-Team Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Boston Dr. Mallika Marshall Heroin Methadone morphine substance exposed newborns UMass Memorial Medical Center Worcester Source Type: news

Are most cancers down to 'bad luck'?
Conclusion This study estimates around two-thirds (65%) of cancer risk is down to chance, based on the number of times stem cells divide in different body tissues. Other factors, including environmental factors and genetics, account for the remaining risk. However, the estimate was quite variable, with 95% confidence intervals ranging from 39% to 81%. So only 4 out of 10 cancers may be a result of bad luck, or, alternatively, as many as 8 out of 10. The wide estimate reduces our confidence in its accuracy. Its reliability would be increased if other research groups arrived at similar numbers by a variety of differe...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

Biological 'Bad Luck' Blamed In Two-Thirds Of Cancer Cases
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON, Jan 1 (Reuters) - Plain old bad luck plays a major role in determining who gets cancer and who does not, according to researchers who found that two-thirds of cancer incidence of various types can be blamed on random mutations and not heredity or risky habits like smoking. The researchers said on Thursday random DNA mutations accumulating in various parts of the body during ordinary cell division are the prime culprits behind many cancer types. They looked at 31 cancer types and found that 22 of them, including leukemia and pancreatic, bone, testicular, ovarian and brain canc...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Elastic Band Theory Of Relationships
, are they really like elastic bands? Should they be? The argument here is that they may be, but they should not be. read more
Source: Psychology Today Relationships Center - April 27, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Anthony Synnott, Ph.D. Tags: Relationships Bad boy bad girls charlie sheen compromise desires elastic band theory elastic bands good girls go to heaven honey intimacy jesse james lament love nbs nbsp nbsp nbsp nbsp nbsp nice girls nice guys poet Source Type: news

EastEnders actor goes the distance in marathon despite injury in support of Alzheimer's Society
EastEnders bad boy Aykut Hilmi ran the Virgin London Marathon this weekend (Sunday 21 April) in support of Alzheimer’s Society.
Source: Alzheimers Society - April 24, 2013 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

EastEnders bad boy runs a marathon for his dad in support of Alzheimer's Society
EastEnders Actor Aykut Hilmi will be running the Virgin London Marathon in support of Alzheimer’s Society.
Source: Alzheimers Society - March 28, 2013 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

Do Women Trade Beauty For Commitment?
Are the most beautiful more likely to get the best of everything?read more
Source: Psychology Today Relationships Center - February 11, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: J. R. Bruns, M.D. Tags: Relationships american men attractive women Bad boy beautiful women beauty Biodemograhy and Social Biology biology professor commitment courtship deference Elizabeth McClintock friends with benefits heterosexual relationships l Source Type: news

Why Are So Many Married Men Living The Dual Life?
The buzz leading up to the Super Bowl was not which team was going to win but the revelation that Hall of Fame Miami Dolphins quarterback and CBS television commentator Dan Marino had fathered a love child. Why would a wholesome family man like Dan end up living a dual life?read more
Source: Psychology Today Sex Center - February 4, 2013 Category: Sexual Medicine Authors: J. R. Bruns, M.D. Tags: Relationships Sex addictive behavior alcohol and drugs Anthony Weiner arnold schwarzenegger Bad boy Bill Clinton bill cosby cbs television comedian bill cosby countless hours courtship Dan Marino David Letterman divorce dua Source Type: news

Facial Scars: Sexy or Unattractive?
Is a facial scar equally attractive on men and women? Is it viewed as more attractive when judging the desirability of a short-term or long-term partner? read more
Source: Psychology Today Relationships Center - January 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gad Saad, Ph.D. Tags: Evolutionary Psychology Relationships al pacino antagonists anthony c attractiveness of a scar bad boy effect batman series birth defect bond villains burriss cleft lip facial attractiveness facial scars fetal development fil Source Type: news