Query: stroke

Filtered By:
Specialty: Consumer Health News

This page shows you your search results in order of relevance.

Order by Relevance | Date

Total 5883 results found since Jan 2013.

Research Offers New Targets For Stroke Treatments
New research from the University of Georgia identifies the mechanisms responsible for regenerating blood vessels in the brain. Looking for ways to improve outcomes for stroke patients, researchers led by the UGA College of Pharmacy assistant dean for clinical programs Susan Fagan used candesartan, a commonly prescribed medication for lowering blood pressure, to identify specific growth factors in the brain responsible for recovery after a stroke. The results were published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Pulse monitor 'will pick up thousands of stroke risk patients'
Patients with a type of heart palpitation that can raise the risk of stroke fivefold will be spotted thanks to a new type of blood pressure monitor, doctors hope.
Source: Telegraph Health - January 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: pulse atrial fibrillation heart palpitations stroke blood pressure Source Type: news

Increased Ambivalence Toward Medication Common In Stroke Patients With PTSD
A new survey of stroke survivors has shown that those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are less likely to adhere to treatment regimens that reduce the risk of an additional stroke. Researchers found that 65 percent of stroke survivors with PTSD failed to adhere to treatment, compared with 33 percent of those without PTSD. The survey also suggests that nonadherence in PTSD patients is partly explained by increased ambivalence toward medication. Among stroke survivors with PTSD, approximately one in three (38 percent) had concerns about their medications...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke Risk Up As Temperatures Drop
Cold weather sends blood pressures soaring putting people at risk of stroke The current cold weather spell is putting more people at risk of stroke as blood pressures increase as a result of the freezing temperatures. High blood pressure is the single biggest risk factor for stroke and research has shown that colder temperatures can be linked to increased blood pressure, especially in older people...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

New anti-stroke drug available on NHS
A 'new generation' drug that dramatically cuts the risk of stroke for people with a common type of heart palpitation has been given the green light for prescription on the NHS.
Source: Telegraph Health - January 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: atrial fibrillation apixaban stroke AF warfarin Source Type: news

Stroke Recovery Aided By Stem Cells
Stem cells from bone marrow or fat improve recovery after stroke in rats, finds a study published in BioMed Central's open access journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy. Treatment with stem cells improved the amount of brain and nerve repair and the ability of the animals to complete behavioural tasks. Stem cell therapy holds promise for patients but there are many questions which need to be answered, regarding treatment protocols and which cell types to use. This research attempts to address some of these questions...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

First Stroke Patients In Florida Treated In UM Stem Cell Trial
The first two stroke patients have been enrolled in a phase 2 clinical trial of a revolutionary new treatment for ischemic stroke being conducted at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital. The trial, using a patient's own bone marrow stem cells, is the first intra-arterial stroke stem cell trial in the U.S., and the two UM/Jackson patients are the first in Florida to participate. Led by Dileep Yavagal, M.D...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Groundbreaking Guidelines On Patient-Centered Measures For Nonsurgical Stroke Interventions
The first outcome-based guidelines for interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke - providing recommendations for rapid treatment - will benefit individuals suffering from brain attacks, often caused by artery-blocking blood clots. Representatives from the Society of Interventional Radiology and seven other medical societies created a multispecialty and international consensus on the metrics and benchmarks for processes of care and technical and clinical outcomes for stroke patients...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

New Stroke Gene Discovery Could Lead To Tailored Treatments
An international study led by King's College London has identified a new genetic variant associated with stroke. By exploring the genetic variants linked with blood clotting - a process that can lead to a stroke - scientists have discovered a gene which is associated with large vessel and cardioembolic stroke but has no connection to small vessel stroke. Published in the journal Annals of Neurology, the study provides a potential new target for treatment and highlights genetic differences between different types of stroke, demonstrating the need for tailored treatments...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

People Having Stroke Should Get Therapy Within 60 Minutes Of Hospital Arrival
People having an ischemic stroke should receive clot-dissolving therapy - if appropriate - within 60 minutes of arriving at the hospital, according to new American Stroke Association guidelines published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. Ischemic stroke, which accounts for nine in 10 strokes, is caused by a blood clot in the arteries leading to the brain. Calling 9-1-1 immediately after recognizing any of the warning signs of stroke - and getting to a stroke center as fast as possible - are still the most important steps for optimal stroke care...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Marijuana Use Doubles Risk Of Stroke
The most popular illegal drug, marijuana, has been found to double the risk of stroke among young adults, according to findings revealed at The American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. The study, carried out in New Zealand, identified that marijuana smokers were more than twice as likely than healthy adults to have suffered an ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Lead investigator of the study, P. Alan Barber, Ph.D., M.D., said: "This is the first case-controlled study to show a possible link to the increased risk of stroke from cannabis...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

In Stroke And Other Neurological Disorders, Nitric Oxide Damages Neurons And Blocks The Brain's Ability To Repair Itself
Nitric oxide, a gaseous molecule produced in the brain, can damage neurons. When the brain produces too much nitric oxide, it contributes to the severity and progression of stroke and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute recently discovered that nitric oxide not only damages neurons, it also shuts down the brain's repair mechanisms. Their study was published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of February 4...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Marijuana Use Linked To Higher Risk Of Stroke
The most popular illegal drug, marijuana, may double the risk of stroke among young adults, according to findings revealed at The American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. The study, carried out in New Zealand, identified that marijuana smokers were more than twice as likely than healthy adults to have suffered an ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Lead investigator of the study, P. Alan Barber, Ph.D., M.D., said: "This is the first case-controlled study to show a possible link to the increased risk of stroke from cannabis...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Study Findings Suggest Physical And Pharmacological Solutions For Human Stroke Victims
Johns Hopkins researchers have found that mice can recover from physically debilitating strokes that damage the primary motor cortex, the region of the brain that controls most movement in the body, if the rodents are quickly subjected to physical conditioning that rapidly "rewires" a different part of the brain to take over lost function. Their research, featuring precise, intense and early treatment, and tantalizing clues to the role of a specific brain area in stroke recovery, is described online in the journal Stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Depression In Both Stroke Patients And Spouse Caregivers Influenced By Self-Esteem And Optimism
Self-esteem, optimism and perceived control influence depression in stroke survivors and their spouse caregivers - who should be treated together, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. Researchers, who analyzed 112 depressed stroke survivors up to 8 weeks after hospital discharge and their spouses, found self-esteem and optimism influenced each partners' depression...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Adult Stroke Survivors Who Practice Tai Chi May Be At Reduced Risk For Falls
Tai Chi may reduce falls among adult stroke survivors, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. Compared to survivors receiving usual care or participating in a national fitness program for Medicare-eligible adults called SilverSneakers®, those practicing Tai Chi had the fewest falls. Tai Chi is a martial art dating back to ancient China. It includes physical movements, mental concentration and relaxed breathing. "Learning how to find and maintain your balance after a stroke is a challenge," said Ruth E...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Study Of Brain Cooling And Clot-Busting Drug Therapy For Stroke Receives FDA OK To Expand
An international multicenter clinical trial led by a Cedars-Sinai neurologist on the combination of brain cooling and "clot-busting" drug therapy after stroke has received Food and Drug Administration approval to expand from 50 patients to 400. � "This approval is highly significant because, after reviewing our initial safety data, the Food and Drug Administration approved us to include more patients in our study," said Patrick D. Lyden, MD, chair of the Department of Neurology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the study's overall principal investigator...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

One In 12 Stroke Survivors Thinks About Suicide
About one in 12 stroke survivors in the U.S. thinks about committing suicide or wish that they were already dead. The finding came from a new study based on a nationally representative sample that was presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. The number of people who experienced a stroke and had suicidal thoughts was surprising, compared with individuals who suffer from other health problems, explained lead researcher Amytis Towfighi, M.D...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Carotid Bypass Surgery Does Not Improve Cognition After Stroke
Patients who have suffered from stroke and receive carotid bypass surgery - which improves blood flow to the brain - see no overall improvement in cognitive performance, researchers informed at The American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. Extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery involves connecting a scalp artery outside the brain to a brain artery, bypassing the blocked carotid artery, in an effort to restore blood flow to the brain...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Life Support Withdrawal Following Stroke
More than a third of patients who suffer a major bleeding in the brain and have their life support withdrawn might have eventually regained an acceptable level of functioning if life support had been sustained, suggests a new study presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. In the United States, 10 percent of the estimated 795,000 strokes each year are intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH)...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Survivors Of Stroke In Infancy Prone To Seizures, Epilepsy
About one-third of American infants and children who suffer bleeding into brain tissue, may later have seizures and as many as 13 percent will develop epilepsy within two years, according to new research reported at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. Bleeding into brain tissue is a type of stroke called intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Each year, an estimated 6.4 newborns and children per every 100,000 in the United States suffer strokes. About half of the strokes are hemorrhagic, typically caused by rupturing of weakened or malformed blood vessels...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke, Depression And Suicidal Thoughts
Nearly one in 12 American stroke survivors may have contemplated suicide or wished themselves dead, according to a study presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. The proportion of stroke survivors who contemplated suicide was striking, compared with patients with other health conditions, said Amytis Towfighi, M.D., lead author of the study and an assistant professor of Clinical Neurology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and chair of the Department of Neurology at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Risk Of Stroke Increased By Southern Diet
Eating Southern-style foods may be linked to a higher risk of stroke, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. In the first large-scale study on the relationship between Southern foods and stroke, researchers characterized a Southern diet by a high intake of foods such as fried chicken, fried fish, fried potatoes, bacon, ham, liver and gizzards, and sugary drinks such as sweet tea. In addition to being high in fat, fried foods tend to be heavily salted...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke-Related Disability Not Improved By Clot-Retrieval Devices
A stroke survivor's chances of living independently after 90 days are not improved by the use of devices inserted into the artery to dissolve or remove a stroke-causing clot shortly after the onset of symptoms, according to a randomized controlled trial involving 656 patients. The study, funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health, compared the intra-arterial device-based approach plus the current standard of intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), a clot-busting drug with IV t-PA therapy alone...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Improved Outcomes After Bleeding Stroke For Patients Who Undergo Surgical Procedure
A minimally invasive procedure to remove blood clots in brain tissue after hemorrhagic stroke appears safe and may also reduce long-term disability, according to late-breaking research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2013. Of the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) each year, most are severely debilitated, said Daniel Hanley, M.D., lead author and professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. ICH is the most common type of bleeding stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Better Results After Stroke Than Supportive Therapy Alone Afforded By Treatment With Clot-Busting Drug
In an update to previous research, Johns Hopkins neurologists say minimally invasive delivery of the drug tPA directly into potentially lethal blood clots in the brain helped more patients function independently a year after suffering an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a deadly and debilitating form of stroke. Rates of functional recovery with the active tPA treatment far surpassed those achieved with standard "supportive" therapy that essentially gives clots a chance to shrink on their own...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Doctors 'Reverse' Brain Bleed Procedure To Treat Critically Ill Stroke Patients
Doctors at Southampton's teaching hospitals have reversed a procedure developed to stem bleeding in the brain to help them save the lives of seriously ill stroke patients. � The innovation, which involves placing a thin wire into the groin and passing it up to the skull using high definition TV images, is based on a technique originally used as an alternative to surgery for patients with ruptured brain aneurysms - fluid-filled bulges which force blood vessels to tear...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Mechanical Clot Removal Compared To Standard Medical Therapy For Severe Stroke
Results of the first randomized controlled study to evaluate a procedure that removes blood clots in the brain from patients experiencing severe strokes was presented at the International Stroke Conference in Honolulu, Hawaii. The study also evaluates if imaging techniques were helpful in identifying patients who potentially would benefit most from clot removal. In addition to the presentation, the full study, led by Chelsea Kidwell, M.D...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Simple Home Test Can Halve The Risk Of Stroke And Cut The Risk Of Death For Thousands Of Patients On Warfarin Therapy
MPs, clinicians and patients are uniting to drive change for patients on long-term warfarin A simple self-monitoring test could reduce the risk of stroke by half in thousands of people who currently take warfarin to prevent blood clots...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Simulations Show How Blood Vessels Regroup After Stroke
By thinking of cells as programmable robots, researchers at Rice University hope to someday direct how they grow into the tiny blood vessels that feed the brain and help people regain functions lost to stroke and disease. Rice bioengineer Amina Qutub and her colleagues simulate patterns of microvasculature cell growth and compare the results with real networks grown in their lab. Eventually, they want to develop the ability to control the way these networks develop. The results of a long study are the focus of a new paper in the Journal of Theoretical Biology...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Prompt Identification And Therapies Can Improve Outcomes In Perioperative Stroke
Strokes that occur during or shortly after surgery can be devastating, resulting in longer hospital stays and increased risks of death or long-term disability. But prompt identification and treatment of such strokes can improve neurologic outcomes, according to an article in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics by Loyola University Medical Center stroke specialists Sarkis Morales-Vidal, MD and Michael Schneck, MD. The article answers commonly asked questions about the management of perioperative stroke...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

New Frontiers In Trauma And Stroke Recovery: Teaching The Brain To Speak Again
Cynthia Thompson, a world-renowned researcher on stroke and brain damage, discussed her groundbreaking research on aphasia and the neurolinguistic systems it affects at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). An estimated one million Americans suffer from aphasia, affecting their ability to understand and/or produce spoken and/or written language. Thompson, Northwestern's Ralph and Jean Sundin Professor of Communication Sciences, participated in a media briefing on "Tools for Regaining Speech" at the Hynes Convention Center...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Coronary Heart Disease And History Of Stroke A Fatal Combination
The cardiology service team at the Hopital Bichat and the Mixed INSERM Unit 698 (AP-HP, Universite Paris Diderot), in collaboration with international teams of researchers, studied a cohort of patients suffering from coronary disease. The study showed that those patients with a history of stroke or transient ischæmic attack (TIA) are not only at higher risk of cardio-vascular episodes but also of haemorrhagic events, stressing the therapeutic challenge involved in treating such patients. The research is published online in Circulation...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

In Mouse Model, Omega-3 Lipid Emulsions Markedly Protect Brain After Stroke
Triglyceride lipid emulsions rich in an omega-3 fatty acid injected within a few hours of an ischemic stroke can decrease the amount of damaged brain tissue by 50 percent or more in mice, reports a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. The results suggest that the emulsions may be able to reduce some of the long-term neurological and behavioral problems seen in human survivors of neonatal stroke and possibly of adult stroke, as well. The findings were published in the journal PLoS One...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

How Does The Brain Protect Itself From Stroke Damage?
Scientists from the University of Oxford say they have discovered how the brain protects itself from damage that occurs in stroke. They wrote about their study in the journal Nature Medicine. If we can harness this inbuilt biological mechanism, which the researchers identified in rats, we could develop effective treatments for stroke, as well as prevent other neurodegenerative diseases in the future...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

The Brain's Innate Ability To Protect Itself From Stroke Damage
The origin of an innate ability the brain has to protect itself from damage that occurs in stroke has been explained for the first time. The Oxford University researchers hope that harnessing this inbuilt biological mechanism, identified in rats, could help in treating stroke and preventing other neurodegenerative diseases in the future...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Blocked Heart Arteries May Presage Stroke
Even if you are considered to be at low risk for stroke, having blocked heart arteries can mean you are more likely to have one, says new research published online this week in Stroke, a journal of the American Heart Association. The researchers suggest blocked arteries should be taken into account to the same extent as other known risk factors such as atrial fibrillation when assessing patients' stroke risk. Lead author Dirk M. Hermann is professor of vascular neurology and dementia at the University Hospital Essen in Germany...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Stroke Risk Tightly Aligned With Coronary Atherosclerosis
This study demonstrates that stroke risk is tightly aligned with coronary atherosclerosis, showing the closely related nature of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease," said Dirk M. Hermann, M.D., the study's lead investigator and professor of vascular neurology and dementia at the University Hospital Essen in Germany...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Walking 'aids stroke recovery'
Taking a regular walk can help recovery from a stroke, according to a study.
Source: Telegraph Health - March 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: walking health stroke exercise Source Type: news

Stroke Survivors Benefit From Regular, Brisk Outdoor Walks
A new study finds that taking regular brisk walks outdoors can help people recovering from a stroke to improve their physical fitness, enjoy a better quality of life, and increase their mobility. The researchers, from the University of the West Indies in Jamaica, write about their findings in the 6 March online issue of the journal Stroke. After experiencing a stroke, many survivors have less energy and walk less because of fear of falling. They also tend to reduce meaningful activity like going to the shops, visiting family and friends, or going to church...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Walking Program Improves Stroke Survivors' Lives
Regular, brisk walking after having a stroke could help boost your physical fitness, mobility and quality of life, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. "Walking is a great way to get active after a stroke," said Carron Gordon, Ph.D., lead author of the study and a lecturer in the physical therapy department at University of the West Indies in Jamaica. "It's familiar, inexpensive, and it's something people could very easily get into...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

In Elderly Treated With Antipsychotics, Stroke Risk Newly Linked To Specific Drug Actions
Antipsychotic administration in the elderly is associated with an increased risk for cerebrovascular accident, more commonly known as stroke; a new study published in Biological Psychiatry provides additional insight into this important relationship. Antipsychotics are prescribed to elderly patients to treat symptoms such as agitation, psychosis, anxiety, insomnia, and depression. The increased risk of stroke associated with these medications was identified approximately a decade ago and has since been replicated by subsequent studies...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Daily coffee 'lowers stroke risk'
A daily cup of coffee may cut the risk of stroke by a fifth, according to Japanese researchers.
Source: Telegraph Health - March 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: grean tea anti-oxidants coffee stroke blood pressure Source Type: news

Rate Of Brain Hemorrhage In Stroke Patients Given TPA Isn't Meaningfully Higher
Millions of Americans take aspirin or other drugs every day to reduce their risk of heart attacks or other problems caused by blood clots. But when one of them suffers a stroke caused by a clot in their brain, some emergency teams might hesitate to give a powerful clot-busting medication called tPA -- for fear that the combination of drugs might cause dangerous brain bleeding. Now, a University of Michigan Stroke Program study suggests this fear may be unfounded, at least for most patients taking common clot-preventing therapies...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

'Dystextia' May Become New Diagnostic For Stroke
Difficulty or inability to write a coherent text message, even in patients who have no problem speaking, may become a "vital" tool in diagnosing a type of crippling stroke, according to new research at Henry Ford Hospital. The case study focused on a 40-year-old man visiting the metro Detroit area on business who showed signs of "dystextia," a recently coined term for incoherent text messaging that can sometimes be confused with autocorrect garble. But in his case, the man saw nothing wrong with the garble...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

"Golden Hour" Access To Stroke Care Increased By 40 Percent: Telestroke Program
Telestroke programs substantially improve access to life-saving stroke care, extending coverage to less populated areas in an effort to reduce disparities in stroke care access. A new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego March 16-23, 2013, found that telemedicine programs in Oregon pushed stroke coverage into previously uncovered, less populated areas and expanded coverage by approximately 40 percent...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Adults Who Experience Stroke Before Age 50 Have Higher Risk Of Death Over Long-Term
In an examination of long-term mortality after stroke, adults 50 years of age and younger who experienced a stroke had a significantly higher risk of death in the following 20 years compared with the general population, according to a study in the March 20 issue of JAMA. "Stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality, with an annual 6 million fatal events worldwide. Stroke mainly affects elderly people, yet approximately 10 percent of strokes occur in patients younger than 50 years...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Astrocyte Signaling Sheds Light On Stroke Research
New research published in The Journal of Neuroscience suggests that modifying signals sent by astrocytes, our star-shaped brain cells, may help to limit the spread of damage after an ischemic brain stroke. The study in mice, by neuroscientists at Tufts University School of Medicine, determined that astrocytes play a critical role in the spread of damage following stroke. The National Heart Foundation reports that ischemic strokes account for 87% of strokes in the United States...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Heart Defect Procedure Reduces Stroke By 73%
A procedure to close a heart defect that most people are born with can decrease the risk of recurrent stroke by 73 percent, according to new data published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings came from an eight year study called the RESPECT trial (Randomized Evaluation of recurrent Stroke comparing PFO closure to Established Current standard of care Treatment). It was made to test the superiority of the AMPLATZER PFO device in the treatment of cryptogenic stroke patients compared with current medical management...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Well: Prevention: Fiber May Reduce Stroke Risk
Eating high-fiber foods may provide protection against stroke, a new analysis of research suggests.
Source: NYT Health - March 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Food Stroke fiber Featured Diet and Nutrition Fiber (Dietary) Source Type: news