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Pinkies Up! There Could Be Some Real Health Benefits To Drinking Tea
Tea gets short shrift as coffee’s milder little sister. But these leaves may have a lot more to offer drinkers than just their subtle taste. Large, observational studies have found lifelong tea drinkers are less likely to face early cognitive decline and get certain types of cancer, stroke, coronary heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. We should also note that by “tea,” we mean the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant that are plucked and processed in different ways to make black, green, white, oolong and pu’er teas -- not herbal infusions like peppermint, hibiscus and chamomile teas. Researchers ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Glitch In Your Golf Swing? Listen To It Sing
Stanford professor Jonathan Berger turns golf stroke data into sound. A nice sound means it's a good swing, a sour sound means something's not right. He tells Scott Simon how that helps people learn.
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baicalin alleviates ischemia-induced memory impairment by inhibiting the phosphorylation of CaMKII in hippocampus.
This study was to reveal the mechanisms by which baicalin protected hippocampal neurons and improved learning and memory impairment after global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in gerbil. In the present study, the Morris water maze test showed that baicalin significantly improved learning and memory impairment after global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in gerbils. Laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope examination showed that baicalin suppressed OGD-induced augmentation of intracellular calcium concentration. Western blotting analysis indicated that baicalin suppressed ischemia-caused elevated phosphorylation level ...
Source: Brain Research - March 21, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Wang P, Cao Y, Yu J, Liu R, Bai B, Qi H, Zhang Q, Guo W, Zhu H, Qu L Tags: Brain Res Source Type: research

The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time
Sleep is one of humanity's great unifiers. It binds us to one another, to our ancestors, to our past, and to the future. No matter who we are, we share a common need for sleep. Though this need has been a constant throughout human history, our relationship to sleep, and our understanding of its vital benefits, has gone through dramatic ups and downs. And right now that relationship is in crisis. The evidence is all around us. If you type the words "why am I" into Google, the first autocomplete suggestion -- based on the most common searches -- is: "why am I so tired?" The existential cry of the modern age. And that's not ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A new variation of dual left anterior descending coronary artery
We report a new variation of dual LAD which has not been reported previously and coronary computed tomography angiography helped to characterize this anomaly. Our case further expands anatomical variations of dual LADs.>
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - March 30, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Comparison of Compensatory Reserve During Lower Body Negative Pressure and Hemorrhage in Non-human Primates.
Abstract Compensatory reserve was measured in baboons (n=13) during hemorrhage (Hem) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) using a machine learning algorithm developed to estimate compensatory reserve by detecting reductions in central blood volume during LBNP. The algorithm calculates compensatory reserve index (CRI) from normovolemia (CRI=1) to cardiovascular decompensation (CRI=0). The hypothesis was that Hem and LBNP will elicit similar CRI values, and that CRI would have higher specificity than stroke volume (SV) in predicting decompensation. Blood was removed in four steps: 6.25%, 12.5%, 18.75%, and 25% of...
Source: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology - March 29, 2016 Category: Physiology Authors: Hinojosa-Laborde C, Howard JT, Mulligan J, Grudic GZ, Convertino VA Tags: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol Source Type: research

What Genetics are Associated with Multiple Sclerosis?
Discussion Multiple sclerosis (MS) is “a chronic degenerative, often episodic disease of the central nervous system marked by patchy destruction of the myelin that surrounds and insulates nerve fibers, usually appearing in young adulthood and manifested by one or more mild to severe neural and muscular impairments, as spastic weakness in one or more limbs, local sensory losses, bladder dysfunction, or visual disturbances.” It is a chronic disease and therefore symptoms must occur more than once. The first episode is called an acute demyelinating attack. Fifteen to forty-five percent of children with their first...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Mental Status Examination in Patients With Suspected Dementia
This article describes a comprehensive approach to the mental status examination and diagnostic workup of patients suspected of having an emerging neurodegenerative dementia. Key strategies for obtaining a history and bedside examination techniques are highlighted. Recent Findings: Classic descriptions of behavioral neurology syndromes were largely based on clinicopathologic correlations of strategic lesions in stroke patients. While still very important, advances in neuroimaging have expanded our armamentarium of cognitive evaluations to include assessments of findings in nonstroke anatomic distributions of disease. Thes...
Source: CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology - April 1, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

FDA warns parents about arsenic in rice cereal
Follow me at @drClaire For years, rice cereal has been a go-to for parents when they start their babies on solid foods. It’s time to change that. In 2012, the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a report warning about high levels of inorganic arsenic in rice and rice products. Rice plants are particularly good at absorbing arsenic from the soil, in particular because they grow in a lot of water. Inorganic arsenic is a common ingredient in pesticides and other products used in farming, and can linger in the soil for a long time after it is used. It can be poisonous. In high doses it is lethal, but even small...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - April 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Parenting Safety Source Type: news

'Dying of heartache?' Heart problems linked to bereavement
Conclusion The study found that people were more likely to have AF for the first time in the weeks immediately after a bereavement, but that this raised risk does not last. Despite the headlines, this does not mean that anyone who's had a bereavement is at immediate risk of "dying of a broken heart". Atrial fibrillation is treatable and not usually life-threatening. Because this was an observational study, we cannot rule out the possibility that factors such as family history of atrial fibrillation or lifestyle factors could have affected the results, although the researcher's conclusion that this is a small poss...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Mental health Source Type: news

Help! My daughter has become a vegetarian!
Q: My daughter has decided to follow a vegetarian diet. Do I need to worry about protein deficiency? ~ Worried Mom This is one of the most common questions that pediatricians are asked. A vegetarian diet, and especially one that includes fish, can be a very healthy option. Learn more about nutrition for vegetarians and ways your family can shift to a vegetarian diet. Q: Does my child need to eat meat to get enough protein? Complete nutrition, including adequate protein, can easily be obtained without eating meat. Meat is completely unnecessary if a diet is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, fish, whole grains, eggs...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Carolyn Sax Tags: Parenting Teen Health Dr. Carolyn Sax vegetarian Source Type: news

Prognostic Risk Profiles for Dementia: A Machine Learning Approach (P1.091)
Conclusions: These results suggest that vascular factors may play a greater role in dementia pathogenesis than currently thought. Furthermore, using this method we were able to achieve prediction accuracies that compare favorably with the existing literature.Disclosure: Dr. Morgenstern has nothing to disclose. Dr. Daley has nothing to disclose. Dr. Hachinski has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - April 3, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Morgenstern, J., Daley, M., Hachinski, V. Tags: Epidemiology of Aging and Dementias Source Type: research

Simulation of Neurological Emergencies for Milestones-Based Learning and Assessment (P2.357)
CONCLUSIONS: Simulations of neurological emergencies can increase resident comfort in several aspects of care and can be used to reliably assess resident competence based on the Neurology Milestones.Disclosure: Dr. Loomis has nothing to disclose. Dr. Robeson has nothing to disclose. Dr. DiCapua has received personal compensation for activities as a consultant. Dr. Dodge has nothing to disclose. Dr. Evans has nothing to disclose. Dr. Moadel has nothing to disclose. Dr. Cruz has nothing to disclose. Dr. Moeller has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - April 3, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Loomis, C., Robeson, K., DiCapua, D., Dodge, K., Evans, L., Moadel, T., Cruz, L., Moeller, J. Tags: Education Research: Graduate Medical Education Source Type: research

Incorporating Quality Improvement into the Third-Year Neurology Curriculum (P2.380)
Conclusions: We present an initiative that gives medical students quality improvement experience and may help reduce patient readmissions. Data analysis is ongoing with final results anticipated in Spring 2016.Disclosure: Dr. Liyanage-Don has nothing to disclose. Dr. Hohler has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - April 3, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Liyanage-Don, N., Hohler, A. Tags: Research Methodology and Education: Patient Safety and Quality Source Type: research

Identification of ADHD in Youth with Epilepsy (P3.257)
Conclusion. Inclusion of behavior rating scales as part of routine care in neurology clinics may be the most efficient and cost effective way to identify ADHD in youth with epilepsy.Disclosure: Dr. Kral has nothing to disclose. Dr. Lally has nothing to disclose. Dr. Boan has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - April 3, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Kral, M., Lally, M., Boan, A. Tags: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology: Epilepsy, Hypoxia, and Stroke Source Type: research

The Utility of Factor VIII Infusion in a Rare Case of SHAM Syndrome (P4.343)
Conclusions: Genetic testing confirmed the presence of SHAM syndrome with an 83 kb deletion involving both F8 and BRCC3 genes responsible for severe hemophilia and Moyamoya disease respectively. This case illustrates the first phenotypically and genetically confirmed adult case of SHAM syndrome with intracerebral hemorrhage and highlights the utility/safety of factor VIII infusion in this case.Disclosure: Dr. Roh has nothing to disclose. Dr. Roth has nothing to disclose. Dr. Al-Mufti has nothing to disclose. Dr. Chung has nothing to disclose. Dr. Connolly has nothing to disclose. Dr. Eisenberger has nothing to disclose. Dr...
Source: Neurology - April 3, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Roh, D., Roth, W., Al-Mufti, F., Chung, W., E. Sander, C., Eisenberger, A., Park, S., Claassen, J., Agarwal, S. Tags: Cerebrovascular Case Reports Source Type: research

Title: Neuropsychological Functions In People with Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy-A Hospital Based Study (P6.211)
Conclusions:1) People with JME (With normal IQ) performed significantly poor as compared to controls on detailed Neuropsychological assessment. 2) Psychological performance significantly correlated with education level, however no correlation was found between duration of epilepsy or duration of treatment.Disclosure: Dr. Bala has nothing to disclose. Dr. Singhal has received personal compensation for activities with Medicolegal as an expert witness and ACTION Trial Stroke Advisory Board and Biogen as a consultant. Dr. Singhal holds stock and/or stock options in Biogen Idec. Dr. Singhal has received re Dr. Sharma has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - April 3, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Bala, K., Singla, P., Sharma, V. Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology: Clinical Syndromes Source Type: research

What Genetics are Associated with Multiple Sclerosis?
Discussion Multiple sclerosis (MS) is “a chronic degenerative, often episodic disease of the central nervous system marked by patchy destruction of the myelin that surrounds and insulates nerve fibers, usually appearing in young adulthood and manifested by one or more mild to severe neural and muscular impairments, as spastic weakness in one or more limbs, local sensory losses, bladder dysfunction, or visual disturbances.” It is a chronic disease and therefore symptoms must occur more than once. The first episode is called an acute demyelinating attack. Fifteen to forty-five percent of children with their first...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Insular Cortex and the Regulation of Cardiac Function.
Authors: Oppenheimer S, Cechetto D Abstract Cortical representation of the heart challenges the orthodox view that cardiac regulation is confined to stereotyped, preprogrammed and rigid responses to exteroceptive or interoceptive environmental stimuli. The insula has been the region most studied in this regard; the results of clinical, experimental, and functional radiological studies show a complex interweave of activity with patterns dynamically varying regarding lateralization and antero-posterior distribution of responsive insular regions. Either acting alone or together with other cortical areas including the ...
Source: Comprehensive Physiology - April 12, 2016 Category: Physiology Tags: Compr Physiol Source Type: research

Battelle’s NeuroLife uses thought to control paralyzed limbs
Patient Ian Burkhart (front) and project electrical engineering lead Nick Annetta (back right). (photo by Battelle) Researchers at Battelle today published a paper in Nature covering the progress of its NeuroLife system, implanted in quadriplegic patient Ian Burkhart. In 2014, Burkhart became the 1st patient ever to achieve motor control of his paralyzed arms and hands through his own thoughts. The NeuroLife system restored enough motion for Burkhart to perform tasks such as pouring out bottles, mixing liquids and taking a credit card from his wallet and swiping it. Burkhart, a quadriplegic, was injured in a 2010 diving ...
Source: Mass Device - April 13, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Neurological Prosthetics Research & Development Battelle Source Type: news

Why We Study Sleep
This post is adapted from a speech delivered at a Fireside Chat between Arianna Huffington and Andre Iguodala on April 11, 2016 at Stanford University. You can watch the event here. Before introducing our famous guests, as director of the Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, I have been asked to introduce the topic of sleep and sleep disorders and why we should bother to study sleep. This is not difficult for me as sleep is my passion. The first reason for studying sleep is simply that sleep is one of the last remaining mysteries in biology. We still don't understand why a typical human has to spend 25 years of life sle...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Calibrating random forests for probability estimation
Probabilities can be consistently estimated using random forests. It is, however, unclear how random forests should be updated to make predictions for other centers or at different time points. In this work, we present two approaches for updating random forests for probability estimation. The first method has been proposed by Elkan and may be used for updating any machine learning approach yielding consistent probabilities, so‐called probability machines. The second approach is a new strategy specifically developed for random forests. Using the terminal nodes, which represent conditional probabilities, the random forest ...
Source: Statistics in Medicine - April 14, 2016 Category: Statistics Authors: Theresa Dankowski, Andreas Ziegler Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

Help! My daughter has become a vegetarian!
Q: My daughter has decided to follow a vegetarian diet. Do I need to worry about protein deficiency? ~ Worried Mom This is one of the most common questions that pediatricians are asked. A vegetarian diet, and especially one that includes fish, can be a very healthy option. Learn more about nutrition for vegetarians and ways your family can shift to a vegetarian diet. Q: Does my child need to eat meat to get enough protein? Complete nutrition, including adequate protein, can easily be obtained without eating meat. Meat is completely unnecessary if a diet is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, fish, whole grains, eggs...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Carolyn Sax Tags: Parenting Teen Health Dr. Carolyn Sax vegetarian Source Type: news

Exploring the science behind the marathon runner
Running the Boston Marathon takes months of training, and it can take a toll on elite marathoners and novice athletes alike. Vector checked in with some of the experts in the Boston Children’s Hospital’s Sports Medicine Division to learn more about how science can aid marathon runners, prevent injury and illness and facilitate recovery. Chocolate milk: A no-brainer for maximizing recovery The most rapid way to maximize recovery after an endurance run is to consume carbohydrates in a 4:1 ratio within 30 to 60 minutes of completing the marathon. The enzyme glycogen synthase is most active within this time frame; it syn...
Source: Mass Device - April 18, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Methodological issues in the design and evaluation of supported communication for aphasia training: a cluster-controlled feasibility study
Conclusions The feasibility study informed components of the intervention and implementation in day-to-day practice. Modifications to the design are needed before a definitive cluster-randomised trial can be undertaken. Trial registration number ISRCTN37002304; Results.
Source: BMJ Open - April 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Horton, S., Clark, A., Barton, G., Lane, K., Pomeroy, V. M. Tags: Open access, Communication, Rehabilitation medicine Research Source Type: research

Reinforcement learning of self-regulated sensorimotor β-oscillations improves motor performance
Publication date: 1 July 2016 Source:NeuroImage, Volume 134 Author(s): G. Naros, I. Naros, F. Grimm, U. Ziemann, A. Gharabaghi Self-regulation of sensorimotor oscillations is currently researched in neurorehabilitation, e.g. for priming subsequent physiotherapy in stroke patients, and may be modulated by neurofeedback or transcranial brain stimulation. It has still to be demonstrated, however, whether and under which training conditions such brain self-regulation could also result in motor gains. Thirty-two right-handed, healthy subjects participated in a three-day intervention during which they performed 462 trials...
Source: NeuroImage - April 19, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Compensatory Reserve Index Can Aid in Early Shock Detection
EARLY SHOCK DETECTION Convertino VA, Howard JT, Hinojosa-Laborde C. Individual-specific, beat-to-beat trending of significant human blood loss: The compensatory reserve. Shock. Jan. 6, 2015. [Epub ahead of print.] Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of death in trauma. The challenge is detecting shock early enough to intervene clinically. The human body is masterful at compensating with a variety of seemingly undetectable mechanisms, such as autonomic activity, vasoconstriction, increased stroke volume, improved cardiac filling and more efficient breathing. So by the time we see alterations in vital sign metrics, the p...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - August 10, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alexander L. Trembley, NREMT P Tags: Special Topics Cardiac & Resuscitation Columns Patient Care Source Type: news

Northwich mother left paralysed after stroke learns how to walk again
Louise Palfreyman, 32, from Cheshire, learned to walk and talk again after a blood clot crippled her left-hand side. The single mother, pictured with daughter Alisha, is now warning others.
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Transient occlusion of the right coronary artery by a calcific bicuspid aortic valve mass – An interesting case of inferior STEMI
We report the case of a myocardial infarction caused by transient occlusion of the right coronary artery, secondary to a mobile calcified lesion attached to a bicuspid aortic valve. <Learning objective: The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the importance of echocardiography in patients presenting with an acute myocardial infarction, without significant coronary artery disease. Urgent echocardiography in this case ensured identification of a calcified bicuspid valve and mobile lesion that had transiently occluded the right coronary artery. Subsequent urgent surgery ensured an excellent outcome.>
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - April 23, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

A doctor's unique perspective after cancer and a stroke
34-year-old Diana Cejas tells her story of learning how to walk and talk again, what it was like to be a patient, and how she's become a better doctor
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prevalence of people who could benefit from augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in the UK: determining the need.
CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: To provide accurate figures on the potential need for and use of AAC, data need to be consistently and accurately recorded and regularly reviewed at a community level. The existing data suggest an urgent need for more accurate and up to date information to be captured about the need for AAC in the UK to provide better services and ensure access to AAC strategies, equipment and support. PMID: 27113569 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders - April 25, 2016 Category: Speech Therapy Authors: Creer S, Enderby P, Judge S, John A Tags: Int J Lang Commun Disord Source Type: research

The effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf flavonoids on spatial learning and memory in chronic cerebral ischemia-induced vascular dementia of rats.
Abstract Flavonoids have been shown to improve cognitive function and delay the dementia progression. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In the present study, we examined the effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoids (SSTFs) extracted from S. baicalensis Georgi on spatial learning and memory in a vascular dementia (VaD) rat model and explored its molecular mechanisms. The VaD rats were developed by permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. Seven days after recovery, the VaD rats were treated with either 50 or 100 mg/kg of SSTF for 60 days. The spatial learning a...
Source: Acta Biochimica et Biophysica Sinica - April 25, 2016 Category: Biochemistry Authors: Cao Y, Liang L, Xu J, Wu J, Yan Y, Lin P, Chen Q, Zheng F, Wang Q, Ren Q, Gou Z, Du Y Tags: Acta Biochim Biophys Sin (Shanghai) Source Type: research

‘I was still in there’: A 32-year-old learns what it’s like to be trapped inside her own body
Not asleep but not yet awake, Brisa Alfaro could hear her doctors' prognosis: She might never walk or talk again, and she may never eat or breathe on her own. Maybe — just maybe — she would show involuntary movement, she heard them say. She couldn't respond. She started to panic. At the age of 32, Alfaro had experienced a brain-stem stroke, causing a […]
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - May 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Bever Tags: brain & mental health Source Type: news

Noah’s story: Enterovirus and a race against the clock
“I’m so excited to babyproof my house,” says Elisa Holt. “I haven’t had to. Now, Noah wants to climb and do all of these normal baby things.” The toddler, born in March 2014, sailed through his first six months of life. As summer turned to fall, enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), a mysterious virus linked with paralysis, started to dominate headlines. On Oct. 3, 2014, Elisa was nursing Noah when she realized something was wrong with her son. “I went to sit him up and he just fell over. I did it again and the same thing happened.” When she realized he wasn’t moving his feet, legs or toes, she called her son’s ped...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 2, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Department of Neurology Dr. Donna Nimec Dr. Mark Gorman enterovirus D68 Guillain Barre Syndrome Source Type: news

Compensatory Reserve Index Can Aid in Early Shock Detection
EARLY SHOCK DETECTION Convertino VA, Howard JT, Hinojosa-Laborde C. Individual-specific, beat-to-beat trending of significant human blood loss: The compensatory reserve. Shock. Jan. 6, 2015. [Epub ahead of print.] Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of death in trauma. The challenge is detecting shock early enough to intervene clinically. The human body is masterful at compensating with a variety of seemingly undetectable mechanisms, such as autonomic activity, vasoconstriction, increased stroke volume, improved cardiac filling and more efficient breathing. So by the time we see alterations in vital sign metrics, the p...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - August 10, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alexander L. Trembley, NREMT P Tags: Special Topics Cardiac & Resuscitation Columns Patient Care Source Type: news

Combining rTMS and CIMT: A "one-size-fits-all" therapy for congenital hemiparesis?
In the past decade, we have experienced dramatic progress in the treatment of children with congenital hemiparesis.1 One important step was the introduction of intensive rehabilitation approaches based on principles of motor learning and neuroplasticity, such as constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and intensive bimanual training. Often these approaches are implemented in socially stimulating "camp" environments.
Source: Neurology - May 1, 2016 Category: Neurology Authors: Staudt, M., Gordon, A. M. Tags: All Rehabilitation, Plasticity, TMS, Pediatric stroke; see Cerebrovascular Disease/ Childhood stroke EDITORIALS Source Type: research

The Mini-BESTest: a review of psychometric properties
The Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest) has been identified as the most comprehensive balance measure for community-dwelling adults and elderly individuals. It can be used to assess balance impairments in several other conditions, mainly Parkinson’s disease and stroke. Despite increasing use of the Mini-BESTest since it was first published 5 years ago, no systematic review synthesizing its psychometric properties is available. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of the psychometric properties of the Mini-BESTest when administered to patients with balance deficits because of differe...
Source: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research - May 3, 2016 Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Review articles Source Type: research

Don't Simply Turn Away
Did you know that there are 35 national health observances that take place during the month of May? To name a few: Hepatitis and Stroke Awareness Month, Mental Health Month, Teen Pregnancy Prevention, National Physical Education and Sport Week, National Bike to School Day and World Autoimmune Awareness Day. There are a total of 213 national health observances throughout the year. Some might ask: "Is of all this necessary?" "Aren't 213 observances a bit of an overkill?" "Why so many?" We often hear these questions because the majority of people don't really understand the hardships, difficulties, and struggles of ot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diabetes drug pioglitazone could get personal: Neither panacea, nor peril
When I was in training, one of my beloved mentors declared, “I never use a drug until it’s been on the market for 20 years.” I was young enough then that I couldn’t fathom being a doctor for 20 years, let alone waiting two decades to use a new drug. As my career has progressed, I’ve seen many new drugs released to the market. Some of them are truly miraculous, bringing people longer, healthier, and more productive lives. Many of them have not withstood the test of time. More than a few have even been taken off the market. Even though the Food and Drug Administration diligently reviews each new medicine before it...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - May 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lori Wiviott Tishler, MD, MPH Tags: Diabetes Drugs and Supplements pioglitazone thiazolidinediones Source Type: news

Scientist will use satellite data to study lightning that sizzles
Researchers want to learn more about long-stroke lightning that makes things sizzle.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Starting out - Standards set in our code were with me every day of my first placement.
Abstract After spending 11 weeks on a stroke rehabilitation ward, I have now finished my first clinical placement. I never thought I could learn so much in such a short time. PMID: 27154104 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Nursing Standard - May 3, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: Mulreany M Tags: Nurs Stand Source Type: research

5 Research-Backed Reasons To Do Leg Exercises
There's a reason hardcore fitness geeks call squats the "king of exercises." When done correctly, they're fantastic for your body. Squats -- as well as other weight-bearing moves like lunges -- strengthen your glutes, quads, hamstrings and core. They can also do wonders for your balance and coordination. (Here's a guide to doing a squat properly.) Want even more incentive to up your strength training game? Check out these unexpected reasons to incorporate leg exercises into your workout routine: 1. They're good for your knees It's a myth that doing squats damages your knees. When executed correctly, squats actually streng...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise to Extend Your Life
by Phil Hardesty Imagine if there was a pill you could take that was free and would virtually eliminate, or at least minimize most disease processes. It would provide you with energy and strength to live your life beyond what you thought was possible. Everyone would want this pill and if it worked as well as it promised, just think of how healthy our population may be. Of course this "pill" does exist. It's called regular physical activity and exercise. According to the World Health Organization's Global Health Risks data physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death globally only behind high blood pressure, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnancy Is Scary Enough Without Having To Worry That a Catholic Hospital Might Turn You Away
Maybe I'm just more attuned to it these days -- your 30s will do that to you -- but lately it feels like everyone I know has a scary story about pregnancy. After the adorable photographs have been posted, the celebratory texts sent, the welcome-back-to-the-world-of-sushi-and-beer meals eaten, they tell you about the darker parts of the experience. The nightmarishly long labor. The NICU. The miscarriages that sometimes came before. The last thing any of these women should have to worry about -- the last thing anyone who is pregnant, or their family, should have to worry about -- is being denied appropriate medical care be...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teen who suffered a stroke while taking the Pill has a THIRD of her skull removed
Grace Russell, now 23, from Staffordshire, was left in a medically induced coma for two weeks, while doctors told her parents to prepare for the worst. She recovered but had to learn to walk and talk again.
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension
Inger Hallberg,1,11 Charles Taft,1,11 Agneta Ranerup,2,11 Ulrika Bengtsson,1,11 Mikael Hoffmann,3,10 Stefan Höfer,4 Dick Kasperowski,5 Åsa Mäkitalo,6 Mona Lundin,6 Lena Ring,7,8 Ulf Rosenqvist,9 Karin Kjellgren1,10,11 1Institute of Health and Care Sciences, 2Department of Applied Information Technology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 3The NEPI Foundation, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Medical Psychology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria; 5Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, 6Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg...
Source: Integrated Blood Pressure Control - May 6, 2014 Category: Cardiology Tags: Integrated Blood Pressure Control Source Type: research

International Clinical Trials' Day 2016
International Clinical Trials' Day is celebrated around the world each year on or close to 20 May, commemorating the day in 1747 on which James Lind began the first known controlled trial, comparing different treatments for scurvy then in common use among sailors in the British Royal Navy. (Watch a video explaining the trial to see history in the making.) International Clinical Trials' Day seeks to raise awareness of the importance of research to health care, and draw attention to ways in which the research can become more relevant to practice.The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) helps to co-ordin...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - May 19, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Health Tip: Have Headaches? Speak to Your Doctor
-- A headache is generally recognized as having pain or discomfort anywhere in the head, scalp or neck. It can be a symptom of everything from minor stress to a life-threatening stroke. Learning all you can about your condition is a first step on...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Long-term health of vegetarians & vegans
The Nutrition Society Paper of the Month for February is from Proceedings of the Nutrition Society and is entitled 'The long-term health of vegetarians and vegans'.  The study findings were presented at the 2015 Summer Conference on ‘The future of animal products in the human diet: health and environmental concerns’ during symposium three which focused on alternatives to meat.  Vegetarians are defined as people who do not eat any meat, poultry or fish. They may be sub-classified as lacto-ovo-vegetarians who eat dairy products and/or eggs and vegans who do not eat any animal products. Although vegetarians represent...
Source: The Nutrition Society - February 16, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: Cassandra Ellis Source Type: news