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Assessment Model to Identify Patients With Stroke With a High Possibility of Discharge to Home Clinical Sciences
Conclusions—We have developed an assessment model for identifying patients with a high possibility of being discharged to their homes after an acute stroke. This model would be useful for health professionals to adequately plan patients’ discharge soon after their admission.
Source: Stroke - September 25, 2017 Category: Neurology Authors: Takahiro Itaya, Yusuke Murakami, Akiko Ota, Eiichi Nomura, Tomoko Fukushima, Masakazu Nishigaki Tags: Epidemiology, Quality and Outcomes Original Contributions Source Type: research

Jacob ’s story: What it’s like to have a stroke as a kid
My name is Jacob and I’m 8 years old. Two years ago, I had a stroke. At first, I didn’t realize what that meant, and I didn’t understand why I couldn’t move the way I used to. With time, I’ve been able to get most of my function back, but my right arm has something called dystonia. That means the muscles cramp up and sometimes my arm moves on its own or gets stiff. I can’t control it, and that makes life hard sometimes. I come to Boston Children’s Hospital every few months to see Dr. Michael Rivkin at the Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center there. Nobody likes having to go to the doctor, but Dr. Rivkin is more...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 26, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jacob Downing Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Michael Rivkin stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Michelle is moving ahead after experiencing a stroke
In fall of 2014, I was a senior, excited about finishing high school in New Hampshire and heading off to college. But I could never have guessed what the year would bring. I was an avid lacrosse player and competing in my fifth game of a tournament when I started to notice I was having trouble seeing out of my left eye. Soon, my hand felt weird and I couldn’t grip the stick properly. As I sat on the sidelines, onlookers recommended I be taken to a local hospital. Recovering from stroke I can’t remember a lot of what happened next, but I know that the emergency doctors believed I had a stroke. They sent me to the Stroke...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 2, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Michelle Ostaudelafont Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Laura Lehman pediatric stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

From Buenos Aires to Boston for pediatric stroke care
Twice a year, Osvaldo and Sol board a plane in Buenos Aires, Argentina. For a week or more, they leave behind their home, their friends, their jobs — and, sometimes, their two daughters, Ines and Clara. But what waits for them, a continent away, is worth it. In Boston, they say, they have found expert care for their son, Francisco. “Francisco was perfectly fine when he was born,” says Sol. “But two days later, we were having trouble waking him up.” Although initially doctors assured the family that his behavior was normal, they quickly transferred him to the neonatal intensive care unit when he began having diffi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Michael Rivkin International Health Services physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Cadagan: Humor and tenacity after a stroke
Most parents try to discourage their children from indulging in humor about bodily functions like burping. But for Daniel and Lori Hooley, a simple smirk in response to a belch was the sign they needed that their daughter, Cadagan, was going to be okay. It was 2012 and 7-year-old Cadagan was asleep, tucked into bed for the night. Around 11 p.m., she suddenly awoke — but it wasn’t because of a nightmare or a late-night request for a glass of water. Instead, she seemed limp and couldn’t focus. Then she began throwing up. Born with an extremely rare genetic disorder called trisomy 12p, the little girl had already experi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Laura Lehman Dr. Michael Rivkin stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center vasculitis Source Type: news

Bouncing back: Nolan ’s life after stroke
Although he’s only a little over a year old, Nolan Morel is a bona fide charmer. Clad in a red shirt and navy blue suspenders, he flashes a happy grin at his mother, Rosalia; his physician, Dr. Laura Lehman; and the others in the room. “Look at those dimples!” someone coos, and he giggles in response. “I can’t believe how social he’s being,” laughs Rosalia. “He wasn’t always like this.” In fact, Nolan’s first several days of life were anything but lighthearted. Just a few hours after his birth at a hospital north of Boston, he stopped breathing and had to be manually resuscitated and given oxygen. Whe...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories child life Dr. Laura Lehman feeding therapy occupational therapy physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Striking a balance: Charlie ’s recovery from neonatal stroke
“Hey, Charlie,” says Dr. Michael Rivkin as he gently dangles a small rubber ducky in front of the little boy. “Would you like this?” A wide smile breaks out across the toddler’s face. Why yes, he certainly would like that duck. He reaches and grasps at it, closing his tiny fingers around the toy. For Charlie Strzempek, it’s nothing more than a playful act. But for his parents, Kathleen and Tom, it’s a major accomplishment. Dr. Rivkin isn’t simply offering his patient a toy. He’s testing his ability to grab and hold an object in his right hand — the side of his body affected by a neonatal stroke. A shin...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Michael Rivkin Julie Croteau occupational therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Growth Hormone Improves Cognitive Function After Experimental Stroke Basic Sciences
Conclusions—These findings provide compelling preclinical evidence for the usage of GH as a potential therapeutic tool in the recovery phase of patients after stroke.
Source: Stroke - April 23, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Lin Kooi Ong, Wei Zhen Chow, Clifford TeBay, Murielle Kluge, Giovanni Pietrogrande, Katarzyna Zalewska, Patricia Crock, N. David Aberg, Andrew Bivard, Sarah J. Johnson, Frederick R. Walker, Michael Nilsson, Jorgen Isgaard Tags: Angiogenesis, Basic Science Research, Growth Factors/Cytokines, Cognitive Impairment, Neurogenesis Original Contributions Source Type: research

Medical News Today: What does a stroke feel like? During, after, and ministrokes
Many people know the classic signs of a stroke, such as facial drooping, trouble balancing, and difficulty speaking. But what does having a stroke feel like? Is it painful? What are the long-term effects? What are the symptoms of a ministroke? Also, learn what to do if you or someone nearby may be having a stroke.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Warning signs of stroke in men
We describe how men and women may experience strokes differently. In this article, learn about telltale signs, recovery, and what to do when someone has a stroke.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Predicting Motor and Cognitive Improvement Through Machine Learning Algorithm in Human Subject that Underwent a Rehabilitation Treatment in the Early Stage of Stroke
The objective of this study was to investigate, in subject with stroke, the exact role as prognostic factor of common inflammatory biomarkers and other markers in predicting motor and/or cognitive improvement after rehabilitation treatment from early stage of stroke.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - August 2, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Patrizio Sale, Giorgio Ferriero, Lucio Ciabattoni, Anna Maria Cortese, Francesco Ferracuti, Luca Romeo, Francesco Piccione, Stefano Masiero Source Type: research

Automating Ischemic Stroke Subtype Classification Using Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing
This study sought to use natural language processing of electronic health records (EHR) combined with machine learning methods to automate IS subtyping. Methods: Among IS patients from an observational registry with TOAST subtyping adjudicated by board-certified vascular neurologists, we analyzed unstructured text-based EHR data including neurology progress notes and neuroradiology reports using natural language processing.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - May 14, 2019 Category: Neurology Authors: Ravi Garg, Elissa Oh, Andrew Naidech, Konrad Kording, Shyam Prabhakaran Source Type: research

Texture Features of Magnetic Resonance Images: an Early Marker of Post-stroke Cognitive Impairment
AbstractStroke is frequently associated with delayed, long-term cognitive impairment (CI) and dementia. Recent research has focused on identifying early predictive markers of CI occurrence. We carried out a texture analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images to identify predictive markers of CI occurrence based on a combination of preclinical and clinical data. Seventy-two-hour post-stroke T1W MR images of 160 consecutive patients were examined, including 75 patients with confirmed CI at the 6-month post-stroke neuropsychological examination. Texture features were measured in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex and compar...
Source: Translational Stroke Research - October 31, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

Validity of quantitative assessment of posterior pelvic tilt and contralateral vaulting in hemiplegia using 3D treadmill gait analysis.
CONCLUSIONS: The proposed indices for posterior pelvic tilt and contralateral vaulting are useful for clinical gait analysis, and thus encouraging a more detailed analysis of hemiplegic gait using a motion analysis system. PMID: 32588758 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation - June 25, 2020 Category: Neurology Authors: Tanikawa H, Inagaki K, Ohtsuka K, Matsuda F, Mukaino M, Yamada J, Kanada Y, Kagaya H, Saitoh E Tags: Top Stroke Rehabil Source Type: research

Machine Learning for Brain Stroke: A Review
Machine Learning (ML) delivers an accurate and quick prediction outcome and it has become a powerful tool in health settings, offering personalized clinical care for stroke patients. An application of ML and Deep Learning in health care is growing however, some research areas do not catch enough attention for scientific investigation though there is real need of research. Therefore, the aim of this work is to classify state-of-arts on ML techniques for brain stroke into 4 categories based on their functionalities or similarity, and then review studies of each category systematically.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - August 11, 2020 Category: Neurology Authors: Manisha Sanjay Sirsat, Eduardo Ferm é, Joana Câmara Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

UCLA, partners get $11M to develop stroke-prevention programs for minority populations
UCLA researchers and their partners across Los Angeles County have been awarded an $11 million federal grant to fund research on community-based interventions aimed at reducing the higher rates of stroke and death from stroke among disadvantaged Hispanics, African Americans and Asian Americans.   Research has shown that stroke risk can be substantially lowered by increasing physical activity, controlling blood pressure, adopting a healthy diet, quitting smoking, lowering cholesterol and, for certain individuals, taking medication like aspirin.   However, the underserved populations targeted by this research progr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 1, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

World Stroke Day
NOTE: The following is an op-ed piece by Neala Gill, Cardiovascular Health Nova Scotia. Friday, Oct. 29 is World Stroke Day. It is an opportunity to encourage Nova Scotians to learn more about the signs of a stroke, and what you can do to reduce your risk.
Source: Government of Nova Scotia News Releases - Health - October 28, 2010 Category: American Health Authors: Health (To Jan. 11) Source Type: news

What I learnt about life after Andrew had his stroke - by his wife
in January my husband, Andrew MarR suffered a very serious stroke. He went from being a super-energetic, fit, over-worker to a half-paralysed invalid, writes JACKIE ASHLEY.
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New data-driven machine learning method effectively flags risk for post-stroke dangers
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A team of experts in neurocritical care, engineering, and informatics, with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have devised a new way to detect which stroke patients may be at risk of a serious adverse event following a ruptured brain aneurysm. This new, data-driven machine learning model, involves an algorithm for computers to combine results from various noninvasive tests to predict a secondary event.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Risk for post-stroke dangers flagged by new data-driven machine learning method
A team of experts in neurocritical care, engineering, and informatics, with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have devised a new way to detect which stroke patients may be at risk of a serious adverse event following a ruptured brain aneurysm. This new, data-driven machine learning model, involves an algorithm for computers to combine results from various uninvasive tests to predict a secondary event. Preliminary results were released at the Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting in Philadelphia...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Recognizing a Stroke
Getting treatment fast is key when you're having a stroke. Learn how to recognize the symptoms.
Source: WebMD Health - December 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dabigatran Concentrations and Ischemic Stroke in AFDabigatran Concentrations and Ischemic Stroke in AF
Learn more on how ischemic stroke and bleeding outcomes are tied to dabigatran plasma concentrations. Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Physical rehabilitation approaches for the recovery of function and mobility following stroke.
CONCLUSIONS: Physical rehabilitation, comprising a selection of components from different approaches, is effective for recovery of function and mobility after stroke. Evidence related to dose of physical therapy is limited by substantial heterogeneity and does not support robust conclusions. No one approach to physical rehabilitation is any more (or less) effective in promoting recovery of function and mobility after stroke. Therefore, evidence indicates that physical rehabilitation should not be limited to compartmentalised, named approaches, but rather should comprise clearly defined, well-described, evidenced-based phys...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - April 22, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Pollock A, Baer G, Campbell P, Choo PL, Forster A, Morris J, Pomeroy VM, Langhorne P Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

H2S attenuates cognitive deficits through Akt1/JNK3 signaling pathway in ischemic stroke.
In this study, we established four-vessel occlusion model in rats with cerebral ischemia. We found that NaHS (28mmol/kg, intraperitoneally, for 7 days before ischemia), donor of H2S, significantly shortened the distance and time of loading onto the hidden platform in the positioning navigation process, decreased the latency in the space exploration process when cognitive testing with Morris water maze was performed during ischemic stroke in rats. NaHS also significantly shortened latency and reduced the number of errors in the platform diving experiment. The survival rate of neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and t...
Source: Behavioural Brain Research - April 23, 2014 Category: Neurology Authors: Wen X, Qi D, Sun Y, Huang X, Zhang F, Wu J, Fu Y, Du Y, Dong H, Liu Y, Liu H, Song Y Tags: Behav Brain Res Source Type: research

Attentional focus of feedback for improving performance of reach-to-grasp after stroke: a randomised crossover study
Conclusions: Feedback inducing an EF of attention may be of some benefit for improving motor performance of reaching in people with stroke in the short term; however, these results should be interpreted with caution. Further research using a randomised design is recommended to enable effects on motor learning to be assessed.
Source: Physiotherapy - June 24, 2013 Category: Physiotherapy Authors: K.F. Durham, C.M. Sackley, C.C. Wright, A.M. Wing, M.G. Edwards, P. van Vliet Tags: Original Research Source Type: research

How is self-management perceived by community living people after a stroke? A focus group study.
Conclusion: Self-management post-stroke is complex. Stroke self-management programmes may be optimised when integrating role and emotional management in addition to medical management. Although readiness to self-manage differs among individuals, support should start as soon as possible and continue post-discharge in people's personal environments. Self-management programmes should not only focus on self-management of stroke survivors but also on co-management with relatives. Implications for Rehabilitation This study suggests that health care professionals should pay attention to the way patients understand the word and co...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - May 14, 2014 Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Satink T, Cup EH, de Swart BJ, Nijhuis-van der Sanden MW Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research

Stroke patients' utilisation of extrinsic feedback from computer-based technology in the home: a multiple case study realistic evaluation
Conclusions: Findings suggest that the theory-driven mechanisms underpinning the utilisation of feedback from computer-based technology for home-based upper-limb post-stroke rehabilitation are dependent on key elements of computer feedback and the personal and environmental context. The identification of these elements may therefore inform the development of technology; therapy education and the subsequent adoption of technology and a self-management paradigm; long-term self-managed rehabilitation; and importantly, improvements in the physical and psychosocial aspects of recovery.
Source: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making - Latest articles - June 5, 2014 Category: Information Technology Authors: Jack ParkerSusan MawsonGail MountainNasrin NasrHuiru Zheng Source Type: research

'BeAWARE': supporting non-clinical staff within general practice to promptly identify patients presenting with warning signs of heart attack or stroke.
DISCUSSION: BeAWARE fulfils a practice gap in patient safety by improving non-clinical staff's knowledge, confidence and intended action in response to patients presenting with heart attack or stroke warning signs. PMID: 24897991 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Australian Family Physician - June 1, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Poulter C, Stewart M, Fitzpatrick C, Keech W, Stavreski B, Grenfell R Tags: Aust Fam Physician Source Type: research

Combining D-cycloserine with motor training does not result in improved general motor learning in neurologically intact people or in people with stroke
Neurological rehabilitation involving motor training has resulted in clinically meaningful improvements in function but is unable to eliminate many of the impairments associated with neurological injury. Thus there is a growing need for interventions that facilitate motor learning during rehabilitation therapy, to optimize recovery. d-Cycloserine (DCS), a partial N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist that enhances neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system (Ressler KJ, Rothbaum BO, Tannenbaum L, Anderson P, Graap K, Zimand E, Hodges L, Davis M. Arch Gen Psychiatry 61: 1136–1144, 2004), has been sh...
Source: Journal of Neurophysiology - June 15, 2014 Category: Neurology Authors: Cherry, K. M., Lenze, E. J., Lang, C. E. Tags: Articles Source Type: research

Increased reward in ankle robotics training enhances motor control and cortical efficiency in stroke.
Abstract Robotics is rapidly emerging as a viable approach to enhance motor recovery after disabling stroke. Current principles of cognitive motor learning recognize a positive relationship between reward and motor learning. Yet no prior studies have established explicitly whether reward improves the rate or efficacy of robotics-assisted rehabilitation or produces neurophysiologic adaptations associated with motor learning. We conducted a 3 wk, 9-session clinical pilot with 10 people with chronic hemiparetic stroke, randomly assigned to train with an impedance-controlled ankle robot (anklebot) under either high re...
Source: J Rehabil Res Dev - May 1, 2014 Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Goodman RN, Rietschel JC, Roy A, Jung BC, Diaz J, Macko RF, Forrester LW Tags: J Rehabil Res Dev Source Type: research

Carotid endarterectomy versus stenting for stroke prevention: what we have and will learn from Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial
Abstract: The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST) has major implications for the future of carotid revascularization and stroke prevention. The purpose of The William Hinter Harridge Lecture was to discuss the history of carotid revascularization before CREST, to delineate the emergence of carotid artery stenting as an alternative to carotid endarterectomy, analyze the key findings in CREST, and describe the next phase of investigation, CREST-2.
Source: American Journal of Surgery - March 28, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Fred A. Weaver Tags: Historian's Lecture Source Type: research

Stroke patients¿ utilisation of extrinsic feedback from computer-based technology in the home: a multiple case study realistic evaluation
Conclusions: Findings suggest that the theory-driven mechanisms underpinning the utilisation of feedback from computer-based technology for home-based upper-limb post-stroke rehabilitation are dependent on key elements of computer feedback and the personal and environmental context. The identification of these elements may therefore inform the development of technology; therapy education and the subsequent adoption of technology and a self-management paradigm; long-term self-managed rehabilitation; and importantly, improvements in the physical and psychosocial aspects of recovery.
Source: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making - Latest articles - June 5, 2014 Category: Information Technology Authors: Jack ParkerSusan MawsonGail MountainNasrin NasrHuiru Zheng Source Type: research

The American Heart Association Life's Simple 7 and Incident Cognitive Impairment: The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study Epidemiology
Conclusions Compared with low CVH, intermediate and high CVH were both associated with substantially lower incidence of cognitive impairment. We did not observe a dose-response pattern; people with intermediate and high levels of CVH had similar incidence of cognitive impairment. This suggests that even when high CVH is not achieved, intermediate levels of CVH are preferable to low CVH.
Source: JAHA:Journal of the American Heart Association - June 11, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Thacker, E. L., Gillett, S. R., Wadley, V. G., Unverzagt, F. W., Judd, S. E., McClure, L. A., Howard, V. J., Cushman, M. Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research

The application of precisely controlled functional electrical stimulation to the shoulder, elbow and wrist for upper limb stroke rehabilitation: a feasibility study
Conclusions: This feasibility study indicates that technology comprising low-cost hardware fused with advanced FES controllers accurately assists upper limb movement and may reduce upper limb impairments following stroke.
Source: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation - June 30, 2014 Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Katie MeadmoreTimothy ExellEmma HallewellAnn-Marie HughesChris FreemanMustafa KutluValerie BensonEric RogersJane Burridge Source Type: research

Decision Making in Acute Stroke Care: Learning From Neuroeconomics, Neuromarketing, and Poker Players Comments and Opinions
Source: Stroke - June 23, 2014 Category: Neurology Authors: Saposnik, G., Johnston, S. C. Tags: Acute Cerebral Infarction Comments and Opinions Source Type: research

Reply to “The effects of functional electrical stimulation on upper extremity function and cortical plasticity in chronic stroke patients”
I appreciate the very important and developed suggestions by Dr. Cecatto for our article (). The proposals on the reasons why EMG-controlled FES (EMG–FES) could shift the brain hemispheric-dominant perfusion in our study provided our study further development and progress. The motor output and corresponding muscle and joint proprioceptive feedback may be tightly coupled and coordinated with movement by EMG–FES. As Dr. Cecatto proposed, these neural reorganisation mechanisms should be explored. The sensory components of large afferent fibre activation, proprioceptive input and increased cognitive sensory attention are a...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 10, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Yukihiro Hara Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Abstract 267: Improving Inpatient Stroke Care by Implementing Stroke Units Across Health Systems Using an Improvement Collaborative Approach Session Title: Poster Session II
Conclusions: This inter-provincial Quality Improvement Collaborative was successful in implementing and improving stroke units, and in improving best practice care of inpatient stroke patients. Critical success factors include the engagement of faculty from high-performing centers even if they exist outside the jurisdiction where improvement is sought, and the use of the 7-step framework for implementing stroke units.
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes - June 2, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Kamal, N., Aikman, P., Teal, P., Suddes, M., Collier, T., Hill, M. D., Dawson, A., Veldhoen, R., Harris, D. Tags: Session Title: Poster Session II Source Type: research

Learning the spatial features of a locomotor task is slowed after stroke
The capacity for humans to learn a new walking pattern has been explored with a split-belt treadmill during single sessions of adaptation, but the split-belt treadmill can also be used to study longer-term motor learning. Although the literature provides some information about motor learning after stroke, existing studies have primarily involved the upper extremity and the results are mixed. The purpose of this study was to characterize learning of a novel locomotor task in stroke survivors. We hypothesized that the presence of neurological dysfunction from stroke would result in slower learning of a locomotor task and dec...
Source: Journal of Neurophysiology - July 15, 2014 Category: Neurology Authors: Tyrell, C. M., Helm, E., Reisman, D. S. Tags: Articles Source Type: research

Does the speed of the treadmill influence the training effect in people learning to walk after stroke? A double-blind randomized controlled trial.
CONCLUSION: These results suggest that high-speed training is an effective method for improving the walking ability of stroke patients. PMID: 25027443 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Rehabilitation - July 15, 2014 Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Lee IH Tags: Clin Rehabil Source Type: research

The DARS (Dopamine Augmented Rehabilitation in Stroke) trial: protocol for a randomised controlled trial of Co-careldopa treatment in addition to routine NHS occupational and physical therapy after stroke
DiscussionThe DARS trial will provide evidence as to whether Co-careldopa, in addition to routine NHS occupational and physical therapy, leads to a greater recovery of motor function, a reduction in carer dependency and advance rehabilitation treatments for people with stroke.Trial registration: ISRCTN99643613 assigned on 4 December 2009.
Source: Trials - August 8, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Bipin BhaktaSuzanne HartleyIvana HollowayJ CouzensGary FordDavid MeadsCatherine SackleyMarion WalkerSharon RuddockAmanda Farrin Source Type: research

'Safe' stem cell therapy may help stroke recovery
Conclusion This study provides evidence that a new technique using a patient's own stem cells to aid the recovery from severe ischaemic stoke is feasible and appears to be safe. It was not designed to test whether the technique was better than doing nothing or better than other types of care or treatment. The authors are perfectly clear that this "proof-of-concept study was not designed with a control group or powered to be able to detect efficacy". This means we cannot be sure that the improvements seen in the five patients were caused by the stem cell treatment. They could have occurred anyway as part of the na...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 11, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Effects of a Mirror-Induced Visual Illusion on a Reaching Task in Stroke Patients: Implications for Mirror Therapy Training
Conclusion. The present study confirms that using a mirror reflection can facilitate motor learning. In this task, bimanual movement using mirror training was less effective than unilateral training.
Source: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair - August 13, 2014 Category: Neurology Authors: Selles, R. W., Michielsen, M. E., Bussmann, J. B. J., Stam, H. J., Hurkmans, H. L., Heijnen, I., de Groot, D., Ribbers, G. M. Tags: Clinical Research Articles Source Type: research

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Delivered During Motor Rehabilitation Improves Recovery in a Rat Model of Stroke
Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor ski...
Source: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair - August 13, 2014 Category: Neurology Authors: Khodaparast, N., Hays, S. A., Sloan, A. M., Fayyaz, T., Hulsey, D. R., Rennaker, R. L., Kilgard, M. P. Tags: Basic Research Articles Source Type: research

Modelling the recovery of acute stroke survivors during adaptive robot-assisted training
In this study, the analysis of the trial-by-trial performance highlighted three main aspects of the recovery process: learning, retention, and slacking.
Source: Gait and Posture - August 1, 2014 Category: Orthopaedics Authors: I. Tamagnone, I. Sterpi, V. Squeri, A. Basteris, M. Casadio, V. Sanguineti, P. Sessarego Source Type: research

Ctbrain machine learning predicts stroke thrombolysis result
Conclusions This proof-of-concept study shows that machine learning methods applied to acute stroke CT-scans potentially offers automation, and improved performance in SICH prediction following thrombolysis. Larger-scale cohorts, and incorporation of CT perfusion/angiography data, should be tested with such methods.
Source: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry - September 9, 2014 Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Epton, S., Bentley, P., Ganesalingam, J., Dias, A., Mahady, K., Rinne, P., Sharma, P., Halse, O., Mehta, A., Rueckert, D. Tags: Abstracts Source Type: research

Impact of 5‐Hz rTMS over the primary sensory cortex is related to white matter volume in individuals with chronic stroke
We examined the relationship between rTMS response, indexed by motor learning and cortical morphology in individuals with stroke. Sensory cortical white matter volume was associated with behavioural response to 5 Hz rTMS over ipsilesional sensory cortex followed by motor practice. Understanding factors contributing to variability of response to rTMS may help clarify both who may benefit from rTMS, and also which cortical areas may be most susceptible to rTMS‐induced neuroplastic change.
Source: European Journal of Neuroscience - September 1, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Sonia M. Brodie, Michael R. Borich, Lara A. Boyd Tags: Research Report Source Type: research

Design considerations for a theory-driven exergame-based rehabilitation program to improve walking of persons with stroke
Abstract Virtual rehabilitation approaches for promoting motor recovery has attracted considerable attention in recent years. It appears to be a useful tool to provide beneficial and motivational rehabilitation conditions. Following a stroke, hemiparesis is one of the most disabling impairments and, therefore, many affected people often show substantial deficits in walking abilities. Hence, one of the major goals of stroke rehabilitation is to improve patients' gait characteristics and hence to regain their highest possible level of walking ability. Because previous studies indicate a relationship between walking ...
Source: European Review of Aging and Physical Activity - December 7, 2013 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

Neurologic Music Therapy in Stroke Rehabilitation
Abstract Based on insights from brain research in music, neurologic music therapy (NMT) has been established as a new model for music in therapy and medicine. Standardized clinical interventions are based on clusters of research evidence and established learning principles in motor, speech/language, and cognitive training. The research support for NMT in stroke rehabilitation has been growing rapidly over the past 20 years. This paper will review research data and clinical applications for neurorehabilitation in the speech/language, cognitive and sensorimotor domains.
Source: Current Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Reports - June 1, 2014 Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research

Exploring the utility of analogies in motor learning after stroke: a feasibility study
Individuals who have experienced a stroke need to (re)learn motor skills. Analogy learning has been shown to facilitate motor learning in sports and may also be an attractive alternative to traditional approaches in therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and utility of analogies to improve the walking performance in long-term stroke survivors. Three men aged 76, 87 and 70 years who were 6, 1 and 3 years poststroke, respectively, presented with different walking deficits. An analogy, targeted at improving the walking performance was designed with the help of each participant. During a 3-week interventi...
Source: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research - September 1, 2014 Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Case report Source Type: research

Stroke victim has forehead muscles transplanted into her cheek so she can smile
Sara McKay, 45, from Consett in County Durham says her army husband George, 43, has been her 'lifeline' after having to re-learn to walk and talk due to a paralysing stroke and brain tumour.
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news