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Updated European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation
The current manuscript is an update of the original Practical Guide, published in June 2013[Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, et al. European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Europace 2013;15:625–51; Heidbuchel H, Verhamme P, Alings M, Antz M, Hacke W, Oldgren J, et al. EHRA practical guide on the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: executive summary. Eur Heart J 2013;34:2094–106]. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an ...
Source: Europace - October 23, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Heidbuchel, H., Verhamme, P., Alings, M., Antz, M., Diener, H.-C., Hacke, W., Oldgren, J., Sinnaeve, P., Camm, A. J., Kirchhof, P., Advisors:, Ahmad, Heinrich-Nols, Hess, Muller, Munzel, Schwertfeger, Van Eickels, Richard-Lordereau, Document reviewers:, L Tags: EHRA PRACTICAL GUIDE Source Type: research

New app lets you check air quality as easily as checking the weather
Yareli Sanchez lives in Los Angeles and jogs regularly, but she never used to know if the day’s air quality was bad until after she had already set out for a run — her chest would tighten and it would become hard to breathe. She knew poor air quality triggered her asthma, but she didn’t have a convenient way to check the day’s pollution levels. For the past few months, instead of using trial-and-error, she’s checked UCLA’s new AirForU app, which uses GPS data to give her local air quality ratings. The app is useful for anyone in the U.S. who sees a hazy skyline and wonders how safe it is to breathe outside air...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 23, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors - emerging roles in neuronal memory, learning, synaptic plasticity and neural regeneration.
Abstract Epigenetic regulation of neuronal signalling through histone acetylation dictates transcription programs that govern neuronal memory, plasticity and learning paradigms. Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are antagonistic enzymes that regulate gene expression through acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins around which DNA is wrapped inside a eukaryotic cell nucleus. The epigenetic control of HDACs and the cellular imbalance between HATs and HDACs dictate disease states and have been implicated in muscular dystrophy, loss of memory, neurodegeneration and autistic ...
Source: Current Neuropharmacology - October 21, 2015 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Ganai SA, Ramadoss M, Mahadevan V Tags: Curr Neuropharmacol Source Type: research

8 Ways Sleep Can Help (or Hinder) Your Work Performance
Americans have a sleep problem, and that means we have a work problem. We're getting less and less sleep (especially on work nights), to the point that the CDC has declared sleep deprivation a public health epidemic. Entrepreneurs are particularly susceptible to sleep deprivation given the pressures and massive workloads that are common for business owners of all stripes. But insufficient sleep will cost you in just about every way -- physically, mentally, financially, and on the job. In contrast, high-quality sleep can up your game and give you a competitive edge over the caffeine-addicted zombies wandering the office ha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Sleep Technologies: How Much Snore for the Dollar?
Do you want better sleep? Of course you do. You know how bad it is to miss out on sleep, so it can feel like insult added to injury to read yet another newfound, devastating consequence of insufficient sleep: heart disease, heart attack, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, mental impairment, etc. And the list is expanding almost daily as researchers learn more. There are "easy" actions that may aid with sleep. Relaxation activities like meditation or chamomile tea are useful for some. Setting and sticking to a waking and sleeping schedule, creating a bedroom retreat, and making a list of worries before turning in can he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Clinical Evidence
Abstract Essential tremor (ET) might be a family of diseases unified by the presence of kinetic tremor, but also showing etiological, pathological, and clinical heterogeneity. In this review, we will describe the most significant clinical evidence, which suggests that ET is linked to the cerebellum. Data for this review were identified by searching PUBMED (January 1966 to May 2015) crossing the terms “essential tremor” (ET) and “cerebellum,” which yielded 201 entries, 11 of which included the term “cerebellum” in the article title. This was supplemented by articles in the author’s files that pertaine...
Source: The Cerebellum - October 31, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

Between Extremes: Health Effects of Heat and Cold
Nate Seltenrich covers science and the environment from Petaluma, CA. His work has appeared in High Country News, Sierra, Yale Environment 360, Earth Island Journal, and other regional and national publications. Background image: © Roy Scott About This Article open Citation: Seltenrich N. 2015. Between extremes: health effects of heat and cold. Environ Health Perspect 123:A275–A279; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.123-A275 Published: 1 November 2015 PDF Version (2.4 MB) Although heat waves and cold snaps pose major health risks and grab headlines when they occur, recent studies have uncovered a more complex and...
Source: EHP Research - November 2, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Web Admin Tags: Featured Focus News November 2015 Source Type: research

Breath Analysis Using a Time‐of‐Flight Camera and Pressure Belts
Abstract The proper way of breathing is important for everyone. Healthy people often do not follow respiration until breathing problems start—during stress or during sport activity in physiological cases. More serious cases are stroke, injury, or surgery of the chest and others. So, learning to breathe correctly and/or breathing diagnosis is considerable for many reasons. Two novel methods of breath analysis suitable for diagnostics and rehabilitation are presented. The first technique utilizes pressure belts fastened to the patient's belly and chest, and the second method relies on a SwissRanger SR‐4000 time‐of‐fl...
Source: Artificial Organs - November 3, 2015 Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Ludek Zalud, Marketa Kotova, Petra Kocmanová, Petr Dobsak, Jana Kolarova Tags: Thoughts and Progress Source Type: research

The Split-Belt Walking Paradigm: Exploring Motor Learning and Spatiotemporal Asymmetry Poststroke.
This article reviews findings from this experimental paradigm in chronic stroke survivors and discusses the future questions to be addressed in order to provide optimal rehabilitation interventions. PMID: 26522907 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Physica Medica - November 1, 2015 Category: Physics Authors: Helm EE, Reisman DS Tags: Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am Source Type: research

MMP‐9 in Translation: From Molecule to Brain Physiology, Pathology and Therapy
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Journal of Neurochemistry - November 3, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Behnam Vafadari, Ahmad Salamian, Leszek Kaczmarek Tags: Review Source Type: research

Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Clinical Evidence.
Abstract Essential tremor (ET) might be a family of diseases unified by the presence of kinetic tremor, but also showing etiological, pathological, and clinical heterogeneity. In this review, we will describe the most significant clinical evidence, which suggests that ET is linked to the cerebellum. Data for this review were identified by searching PUBMED (January 1966 to May 2015) crossing the terms "essential tremor" (ET) and "cerebellum," which yielded 201 entries, 11 of which included the term "cerebellum" in the article title. This was supplemented by articles in the author's files that pertained to this topi...
Source: Cerebellum - October 31, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Benito-León J, Labiano-Fontcuberta A Tags: Cerebellum Source Type: research

Outcomes of middle cerebral artery angioplasty and stenting with Wingspan at a high-volume center
Conclusion Intracranial stenting of MCA stenoses may have the potential of better clinical outcomes if patients are properly selected and treated by an experienced operator at a high-volume center.
Source: Neuroradiology - October 29, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: research

Functional rehabilitation of upper limb apraxia in poststroke patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
This study will use a two-arm, assessor-blinded, parallel, randomized controlled trial design, involving 40 patients who present a left- or right-sided unilateral vascular lesion poststroke and a clinical diagnosis of upper limb apraxia. Participants will be randomized to either a combined functional rehabilitation or a traditional health education group. The experimental group will receive an 8-week combined functional program at home, including physical and occupational therapy focused on restorative and compensatory techniques for upper limb apraxia, 3 days per week in 30-min intervention periods. The control group will...
Source: Trials - November 5, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Jose Pérez-MármolMª García-RíosFrancisco Barrero-HernandezGuadalupe Molina-TorresTed BrownMaría Aguilar-Ferrándiz Source Type: research

Disrupting Today's Healthcare System
This week in San Diego, Singularity University is holding its Exponential Medicine Conference, a look at how technologists are redesigning and rebuilding today's broken healthcare system. Healthcare today is reactive, retrospective, bureaucratic and expensive. It's sick care, not healthcare. This blog is about why the $3 trillion healthcare system is broken and how we are going to fix it. First, the Bad News: Doctors spend $210 billion per year on procedures that aren’t based on patient need, but fear of liability. Americans spend, on average, $8,915 per person on healthcare – more than any other count...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Electroencephalographic neurofeedback: Level of evidence in mental and brain disorders and suggestions for good clinical practice
Publication date: Available online 6 November 2015 Source:Neurophysiologie Clinique/Clinical Neurophysiology Author(s): J.-A. Micoulaud-Franchi, A. McGonigal, R. Lopez, C. Daudet, I. Kotwas, F. Bartolomei The technique of electroencephalographic neurofeedback (EEG NF) emerged in the 1970s and is a technique that measures a subject's EEG signal, processes it in real time, extracts a parameter of interest and presents this information in visual or auditory form. The goal is to effectuate a behavioural modification by modulating brain activity. The EEG NF opens new therapeutic possibilities in the fields of psychiat...
Source: Neurophysiologie Clinique - November 10, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Patent foramen ovale: the current state of play
Learning objectives Understand the anatomy and embryology of the interatrial septum and patent foramen ovale (PFO). Develop an overview of the many clinical associations of a PFO. Appraise the clinical evidence for and against closure of PFO. Introduction Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common finding, occurring in up to 25% of people.1 2 An association between PFO and stroke has consistently been seen in up to 50% of patients without an identifiable cause, that is, the so-called cryptogenic stroke (CS) and only in 20% with an identified cause.3 4 Many studies have been published testing the hypothesis that paradoxical emb...
Source: Heart - November 12, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Asrress, K. N., Marciniak, M., Marciniak, A., Rajani, R., Clapp, B. Tags: Education in Heart, Echocardiography, Clinical diagnostic tests Source Type: research

Brain–robot interface driven plasticity: Distributed modulation of corticospinal excitability
In conclusion, the BRI intervention induced a complex pattern of modulated corticospinal excitability, which may boost subsequent motor learning during physiotherapy. Graphical abstract
Source: NeuroImage - November 12, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Why You Should Never, Ever Pull An All-Nighter
It's pretty straight forward: Sleep deprivation is really bad for you.  But even if you don't pull all-nighters, chronically getting too little sleep can be dangerous. For example, drowsiness behind the wheel can be just as deadly as driving under the influence. Over time, in serious cases, sleep deprivation can result in heart disease, stroke and diabetes. And in the immediate aftermath, going without sleep can lead to lack of focus and brain fog, stress and irritability.  But what happens after just one night of no sleep? Watch the Ted-Ed video above to learn about an experiment a high schoo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Activity-dependent neurorehabilitation beyond physical trainings: "mental exercise" through mirror neuron activation.
Abstract The activity dependent brain repair mechanism has been widely adopted in many types of neurorehabilitation. The activity leads to target specific and non-specific beneficial effects in different brain regions, such as the releasing of neurotrophic factors, modulation of the cytokines and generation of new neurons in adult hood. However physical exercise program clinically are limited to some of the patients with preserved motor functions; while many patients suffered from paralysis cannot make such efforts. Here the authors proposed the employment of mirror neurons system in promoting brain rehabilitation...
Source: CNS and Neurological Disorders Drug Targets - November 11, 2015 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Yuan TF, Chen W, Shan C, Rocha N, Arias-Carrión O, Machado S Tags: CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets Source Type: research

Can You Think Yourself Into A Different Person?
For years she had tried to be the perfect wife and mother but now, divorced, with two sons, having gone through another break-up and in despair about her future, she felt as if she’d failed at it all, and she was tired of it. On 6 June 2007 Debbie Hampton, of Greensboro, North Carolina, took an overdose of more than 90 pills – a combination of ten different prescription drugs, some of which she’d stolen from a neighbor’s bedside cabinet. That afternoon, she’d written a note on her computer: “I’ve screwed up this life so bad that there is no place here for me and nothing I can contr...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Novel Derivatives of Docosahexaenoylethanolamide as Therapeutics for Neuronal Disorders
This technology provides derivatives of Docosahexaenoylethanolamide (synaptamide or DEA) which have increased potency and hydrolysis resistance as compared to DEA (structures of these derivatives are available upon request), as well as methods of using these derivatives to promote neurogenesis, neurite growth, and/or synaptogenesis. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid that accumulates in the brain during development, has been shown to play a key role in learning and memory development. Studies have also shown that DEA, a metabolite derived from DHA is very potent in accelerating neuronal growth an...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - January 24, 2013 Category: Research Authors: admin Source Type: research

PhyloPen: Phylogenetic Tree Browsing Using a Pen and Touch Interface
Conclusions Our objective is to develop an interactive phylogenetic tree-browsing user interface for experts that is more dynamic and ideally more natural than commonly used browsers, ultimately allowing the user to navigate, annotate, and change the tree structure with ease. In this work-in-progress, we tested an experimental pen- and touch-based interactive browser we developed called PhyloPen. Our preliminary formative evaluations show positive results, demonstrating some usefulness of pen and touch interfaces for phylogenetic trees. However, additional work based on our formative evaluations, including the revision of ...
Source: PLOS Currents Tree of Life - November 23, 2015 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Anthony Wehrer Source Type: research

Depicting the interplay between organisational tiers in the use of a national quality registry to develop quality of care in Sweden
Conclusions: If NQRs are to provide for quality improvement and learning opportunities, advances must be made in the links between the structures and processes across all organisational tiers, including decision-makers, administrators and health professionals engaged in a particular healthcare process.
Source: BMC Health Services Research - November 25, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Ann EldhMio FredrikssonSofie VengbergChristina HalfordLars WallinTobias DahlströmUlrika Winblad Source Type: research

Development and Application of a Genetic Algorithm for Variable Optimization and Predictive Modeling of Five-Year Mortality Using Questionnaire Data.
This study shows how GA in conjunction with various machine learning techniques could be used to examine questionnaire data to predict a binary outcome. PMID: 26604716 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Bioinformatics and Biology Insights - November 28, 2015 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Adams LJ, Bello G, Dumancas GG Tags: Bioinform Biol Insights Source Type: research

37 Art Therapy Techniques For De-Stressing During The Holidays
The holidays are finally here, bringing an onslaught of family, food and, for many of us, stress on stress. Whether you're dreading endless conversations with your great aunt Judith or getting anxious over the prospect of impending New Year's resolutions, may we humbly suggest you let your creative side serve as a sort of internal massage. Art therapy is a form of therapy predicated on the belief that artistic expression has the power to help us in healing, in self-esteem or simply in chilling out. It's unique in that most other forms of therapy rely on language as the foremost mode of communication, whereas art requi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The multiple validities of neuropsychological assessment.
This article discusses construct and criterion validity of neuropsychological tests, as well as assessment validity, which allows determination of whether an individual examinee is producing valid test results. Factor analyses identify 6 domains of abilities. Tests of learning and memory and processing speed are most sensitive to presence of brain dysfunction in both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tests of processing speed, working memory, verbal symbolic functions, and visuoperceptual and visuospatial judgment and problem solving are sensitive to the severity of TBI and AD, as well as to the ...
Source: American Psychologist - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Larrabee, Glenn J. Source Type: research

NIH hosts BRAIN Initiative scientists
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) The NIH will host a meeting of nearly 400 BRAIN Initiative scientists and officials from the NIH, the National Science Foundation, DARPA, IARPA, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. It will be a unique opportunity to meet the scientists, learn about their promising results and discuss the BRAIN Initiative, a large-scale presidential effort to develop new tools and technologies to understand the healthy and diseased brain.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Every Little Anniversary
One of the things they tell you after they’ve informed you that you have cancer or that you’ve had a stroke—after they tell you about the resections and the radiation—after they tell you about the aspirin and the clopidogrel—after you’re stable medically but still more than a little unstable emotionally—is to look for a support group. I had the kind of cancer that you learn about in medical school and then never see. I was decades younger than most of my physicians’ patients with stroke. The local support groups didn’t seem to fit me. I looked online at first, but then—even though I found a few people w...
Source: JAMA - December 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research

Biotronik launches trial of CLS AF algorithm
Biotronik said today it enrolled the 1st patient in its B3 trial examining the company’s Closed Loop Stimulation physiologic rate response sensor and algorithm. The study aims to whether pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators equipped with the CLS sensor and algorithm are able to reduce the rate of stroke and improve outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation compared to those without the system. “AF is a huge clinical challenge, affecting over 20 million patients in Europe and the US alone. I am very excited to begin this groundbreaking trial. We hope to demonstrate that the physiological h...
Source: Mass Device - December 1, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Implants Software / IT Biotronik Source Type: news

High voltage electric potentials to enhance brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the brain.
Authors: Yanamoto H, Nakajo Y, Kataoka H, Iihara K Abstract Development of a safe method to increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the brain is expected to enhance learning and memory, induce tolerance to cerebral infarction or tolerance to depressive state, improve glucose metabolism, and suppress appetite and body weight. We have shown that repetitive applications of high-voltage electric potential (HELP) to the body increase BDNF levels in the brain, improving learning and memory in mice. Here, we investigated the effects of HELP treatment for a chronic period on the BDNF levels in the mouse...
Source: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience - December 2, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Front Neurol Neurosci Source Type: research

A brain-computer interface to support functional recovery.
Authors: Kjaer TW, Sørensen HB Abstract Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) register changes in brain activity and utilize this to control computers. The most widely used method is based on registration of electrical signals from the cerebral cortex using extracranially placed electrodes also called electroencephalography (EEG). The features extracted from the EEG may, besides controlling the computer, also be fed back to the patient for instance as visual input. This facilitates a learning process. BCI allow us to utilize brain activity in the rehabilitation of patients after stroke. The activity of the cerebral cort...
Source: Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience - December 2, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Front Neurol Neurosci Source Type: research

The multiple validities of neuropsychological assessment.
This article discusses construct and criterion validity of neuropsychological tests, as well as assessment validity, which allows determination of whether an individual examinee is producing valid test results. Factor analyses identify 6 domains of abilities. Tests of learning and memory and processing speed are most sensitive to presence of brain dysfunction in both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tests of processing speed, working memory, verbal symbolic functions, and visuoperceptual and visuospatial judgment and problem solving are sensitive to the severity of TBI and AD, as well as to the fu...
Source: The American Psychologist - November 1, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Larrabee GJ Tags: Am Psychol Source Type: research

Biotronik launches trial of CLS AF algorithm
Biotronik said today it enrolled the 1st patient in its B3 trial examining the company’s Closed Loop Stimulation physiologic rate response sensor and algorithm. The study aims to whether pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators equipped with the CLS sensor and algorithm are able to reduce the rate of stroke and improve outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation compared to those without the system. “AF is a huge clinical challenge, affecting over 20 million patients in Europe and the US alone. I am very excited to begin this groundbreaking trial. We hope to demonstrate that the physiological h...
Source: Mass Device - December 1, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Implants Software / IT Biotronik Source Type: news

Understanding the role of the primary somatosensory cortex: Opportunities for rehabilitation
Publication date: December 2015 Source:Neuropsychologia, Volume 79, Part B Author(s): M.R. Borich, S.M. Brodie, W.A. Gray, S. Ionta, L.A. Boyd Emerging evidence indicates impairments in somatosensory function may be a major contributor to motor dysfunction associated with neurologic injury or disorders. However, the neuroanatomical substrates underlying the connection between aberrant sensory input and ineffective motor output are still under investigation. The primary somatosensory cortex (S1) plays a critical role in processing afferent somatosensory input and contributes to the integration of sensory and motor si...
Source: Neuropsychologia - December 2, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

A Shockingly Small Amount Of Running Can Boost Your Health
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Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

COGNITIVE-HD study: protocol of an observational study of neurocognitive functioning and association with clinical outcomes in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with haemodialysis
Introduction The prevalence of cognitive impairment may be increased in adults with end-stage kidney disease compared with the general population. However, the specific patterns of cognitive impairment and association of cognitive dysfunction with activities of daily living and clinical outcomes (including withdrawal from treatment) among haemodialysis patients remain incompletely understood. The COGNITIVE impairment in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with HemoDialysis (COGNITIVE-HD) study aims to characterise the age-adjusted and education-adjusted patterns of cognitive impairment (using comprehensive testing...
Source: BMJ Open - December 9, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Palmer, S. C., Ruospo, M., Barulli, M. R., Iurillo, A., Saglimbene, V., Natale, P., Gargano, L., Murgo, A. M., Loy, C., van Zwieten, A., Wong, G., Tortelli, R., Craig, J. C., Johnson, D. W., Tonelli, M., Hegbrant, J., Wollheim, C., Logroscino, G., Strippo Tags: Open access, Epidemiology, Neurology Protocol Source Type: research

Persistent (patent) foramen ovale (PFO): implications for safe diving.
Authors: Germonpré P Abstract Diving medicine is a peculiar specialty. There are physicians and scientists from a wide variety of disciplines with an interest in diving and who all practice 'diving medicine': the study of the complex whole-body physiological changes and interactions upon immersion and emersion. To understand these, the science of physics and molecular gas and fluid movements comes into play. The ultimate goal of practicing diving medicine is to preserve the diver's health, both during and after the dive. Good medicine starts with prevention. For most divers, underwater excursions are not a profess...
Source: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine - December 11, 2015 Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Diving Hyperb Med Source Type: research

Motor planning poststroke: impairment in vector‐coded reach plans
We examined whether these vector and target reach‐planning codes are differentially affected after stroke. Participants with stroke and healthy controls made blocks of reaches that were grouped by target location (providing target‐specific practice) and by movement vector (providing vector‐specific practice). Reach accuracy was impaired in the more affected arm after stroke, but not distinguishable for target‐ versus vector‐grouped reaches. Reach velocity and acceleration were not only impaired in both the less and more affected arms poststroke, but also not distinguishable for target‐ versus vector‐grouped r...
Source: Physiological Reports - December 10, 2015 Category: Physiology Authors: John‐Ross Rizzo, Todd E. Hudson, Andrew Abdou, Ira G. Rashbaum, Ajax E. George, Preeti Raghavan, Michael S. Landy Tags: Original Research Source Type: research

Health News: Believe it or Not
Vitamin D Deficiency May Cause MS Employees Working Long Hours Face Increased Risk of Stroke Coffee Could Literally be a Lifesaver When you see these health headlines do you immediately think of how it pertains to you or someone you know?  You probably don’t think, “I should make sure this information is from a reputable source,” or “I should read that research article that this information is based on and ask my clinician about it.” Health care reporting is complicated and has its challenges.  Many journalists do not have the background or education in health and science and are just as uni...
Source: Dragonfly - December 11, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health Source Type: news

In The Marshall Islands, Traditional Agriculture And Healthy Eating Are A Climate Change Strategy
LAURA VILLAGE, Marshall Islands -- Holding in his hand a bunch of what he called mountain apples, Steve Lepton grinned like a kid with a new toy. “Oh, it’s good,” he said. “Yesterday I didn’t find any fruit on this one. Wow, this is great. They’re getting red.” The delicate little fruit is crunchy like an apple and sweet. It’s a popular snack in the Marshall Islands, Lepton told The WorldPost, but kids pickle it with salt and Kool-Aid, which defeats the purpose of eating fruit in the first place.  As the Global Climate and Health Alliance made clear with an announcement ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

At UCLA, it's medicine 2.0
Tucked deep in the basement of UCLA’s Center for the Health Sciences is a room that looks more like an inventor’s fantasy workshop than the medical research facility it is. Tables are piled high with tools, electronics, prototype equipment parts and a few stray robotic arms. Posters on the wall describe pending projects in dense technical language with accompanying photos of futuristic devices. This hidden space is where scientists are working at the very forefront of technological advances in medicine. Its assemblage of smarts, parts and computers is contributing to an emerging era of personalized, tech-enabled health...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 16, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Introducing Sleep + Wellness
First, the bad news. We're in the middle of a sleep crisis. According to a recent Gallup poll, 40 percent of all American adults are sleep-deprived. And the problem runs deep: the idea of sleep as time wasted not only compromises our health and our decision-making, it also undermines our relationships, our work lives, our performance and our decision-making. Now, the good news. We're also in the midst of a sleep revolution, finding ourselves in a golden age of sleep science, with new findings coming out practically every day testifying to sleep's benefits. Scientists are confirming what our ancestors knew instinctively: t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings.
Authors: Galińska E Abstract The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments a...
Source: Psychiatria Polska - December 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatr Pol Source Type: research

Self-management support interventions for persons with chronic disease: an evidence-based analysis.
CONCLUSIONS: The Stanford CDSMP led to statistically significant, albeit clinically minimal, short-term improvements across a number of health status measures (including some measures of health-related quality of life), healthy behaviours, and self-efficacy compared to usual care. However, there was no evidence to suggest that the CDSMP improved health care utilization. More research is needed to explore longer-term outcomes, the impact of self-management on clinical outcomes, and to better identify responders and non-responders. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY: Self-management support interventions are becoming more common as ...
Source: Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series - December 20, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Ont Health Technol Assess Ser Source Type: research

Book Review: Body of Truth
My friend’s husband once said I’d be a great catch if I would just “lose a little more weight.” I was surprised by his comment, particularly since he carries around a spare tire and since I am healthy (and happy) in size. Unfortunately, he, like many others, believes that being a stick is a pre-requisite to being a “great catch.” Now, after reading Harriet Brown’s Body of Truth: How Science, History, and Culture Drive Our Obsession with Weight — and What We Can Do about It, I want us all to eradicate this kind of bizarre commentary and judgment. Body of Truth is hard to describe in a nutshell. At its best, ...
Source: Psych Central - December 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stephanie Kotelnicki Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition General Healthy Living Personal Stories Policy and Advocacy Psychology Weight Loss Women's Issues americas diet industry anorexia in america being skinny isnt healthy Source Type: news

The relationship between novel word learning and anomia treatment success in adults with chronic aphasia
Discussion This is the first group study to directly examine the relationship between novel word learning and therapy outcomes for anomia rehabilitation in adults with aphasia. Importantly, we found that novel word learning performance was correlated with therapy outcomes. We propose that novel word learning ability may contribute to the initial acquisition of treatment gains in anomia rehabilitation.
Source: Neuropsychologia - December 25, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

'We should assess the students in more authentic situations: Swedish PE teacher educators views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers
The question of what knowledge a student of Physical Education (PE) needs to develop during PE teacher education (PETE) was recently discussed. One form of knowledge is the movement practices that students must meet during their education. Given the limited time, a delicate matter is whether to prioritize movement knowledge and consider it as subject matter knowledge (e.g. performance of the freestyle stroke) or as pedagogical content knowledge (e.g. teaching how to perform the freestyle stroke). The aim is to investigate Swedish PE teacher educators’ views on the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers and...
Source: European Physical Education Review - December 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Backman, E., Pearson, P. Tags: Articles Source Type: research

Rivaroxaban for treatment of intraventricular thrombus in Chagas disease
We present a case of a 61-year-old man admitted for stroke 5 months after a renal embolism. An intraventricular thrombus was observed, probably the source of the cerebral and renal embolisms. The patient refused warfarin and rivaroxaban was used instead. After 40 days of treatment the thrombus had dissolved, after 20 months of regular use of rivaroxaban no more embolic events were observed. The use of rivaroxaban was effective in preventing embolic events in Chagas disease and intraventricular thrombus. <Learning objective: Warfarin is recommended for stroke prevention in patients with Chagas disease and left ventri...
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - January 12, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research