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Ditching masks at a stroke is too much too soon
Responding to the Prime Minister’s announcement end​ing rules requiring face coverings in enclosed public spaces, UNISON assistant general secretary Jon Richards said today (Monday): “This isn’t the time to throw caution to the wind, especially with infections on the rise. The economy is important, but so is public confidence. “These hasty changes will create a confusing cocktail of guidance. The public will be expected to know how to react to each and every situation they face. “Pressure is already building on ambulance and other NHS services, and that’s before safety measures are ditched. It’s just to...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - July 5, 2021 Category: Food Science Authors: Anthony Barnes Tags: News Press release face coverings pandemic Source Type: news

Barilla Foundation Brings Health and Climate Together in New Double Pyramid
The Barilla Foundation New Double Pyramid includes seven cultural pyramids including ones for specific regions like South Asia where these rice workers come from. Other cultural regions include Latin America, East Asia, Nordic and Canada, USA, Mediterranean and Africa. Credit: Deepak Kumar / Unsplash By Alison KentishNEW YORK, Apr 12 2021 (IPS) Following an extensive scientific review, the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (BCFN) is preparing to launch a new food systems model which incorporates nutrition and climate. Researchers from the Foundation teamed up with counterparts from the Frederico II Univers...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Alison Kentish Tags: Climate Change Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Natural Resources TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Source Type: news

Correlates of a southern diet pattern in a national cohort study of blacks and whites: the REGARDS study
CONCLUSION: There was a high consumption of the Southern dietary pattern in the US black population, regardless of other factors, underlying our previous findings showing the substantial contribution of this dietary pattern to racial disparities in incident hypertension and stroke.PMID:33632366 | DOI:10.1017/S0007114521000696
Source: The British Journal of Nutrition - February 26, 2021 Category: Nutrition Authors: Catharine A Couch Marquita S Brooks James M Shikany Virginia J Howard George Howard D Leann Long Leslie A McClure Jennifer J Manly Mary Cushman Neil A Zakai Keith E Pearson Emily B Levitan Suzanne E Judd Source Type: research

Vegetarians, fish, poultry, and meat-eaters: who has higher risk of cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality? A prospective study from UK Biobank
Conclusion  Eating fish rather than meat or poultry was associated with a lower risk of a range of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Vegetarianism was only associated with a lower risk of CVD incidence.
Source: European Heart Journal - December 14, 2020 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Food as Prevention – Rising to Nutritional Challenges
Mothers and their children gather at a community nutrition centre in the little village of Rantolava, Madagascar, to learn more about a healthy diet. Credit: Alain Rakotondravony/IPSBy Gabriele RiccardiNAPLES, Italy, Nov 25 2020 (IPS) The risks factors contributing to the dramatic rise in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in recent decades have been known for a long time but the Covid-19 pandemic has brutally exposed our collective failure to deal with them. Reporting on the findings of the latest Global Burden of Disease Study, The Lancet warns of a “perfect storm” created by the interaction of the highly infectious C...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Gabriele Riccardi Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foun Source Type: news

Reducing the Risk of Stroke in Patients with Impaired Renal Function: Nutritional Issues
Patients with renal failure have extremely high cardiovascular risk; in dialysis patients the risk of stroke is increased approximately 10-fold over that in the general population. Reasons include not only a high prevalence of traditional risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia, but also the accumulation of toxic substances that are eliminated by the kidneys, so have very high levels in patients with renal failure. These include plasma total homocysteine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, thiocyanate, and toxic products of the intestinal microbiome (Gut-Derived Uremic Toxins; GDUT), which include trimethyla...
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - November 17, 2020 Category: Neurology Authors: J. David Spence Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Featured Review: Taxation of the fat content of foods for reducing their consumption and preventing obesity or other adverse health outcomes
ConclusionsWe did not find enough reliable evidence to find out whether a tax on the fat content of foods resulted in people eating less fat, or less saturated fat.We did not find any evidence about how a tax on the fat content of foods affected obesity or overweight.The results of our review will change when further evidence becomes available.Discussing the findings of this review, lead author Stefan Lhachimi said, “A tax on saturated fats could be in principle a good approach to reduce the consumption of so-called junk foods, a group of food products which is fiendishly tricky to define in legal terms. By taxing a main...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 7, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rachel Klabunde Source Type: news

Things I know to be true 1 – We are all walking miracles
Back when I was child I genuinely believed that when my mother kissed my knee to make it better, she did actually do that. And as I grew older although that belief faded away in the light of the obvious ‘fact’ of the medical model, it never truly disappeared. Time and again I would reflect on what it meant to be healthy and when my own health challenges began in my mid-teens, some part of me always knew that my mother’s kiss held meaning. I remember being 16 years old and just about to sit ‘O’ levels, as they were then. I had been having a period for what must have been weeks and I was tired a...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - June 25, 2020 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Health life miracle Source Type: news

Things I know to be true – We are all walking miracles
Back when I was child I genuinely believed that when my mother kissed my knee to make it better, she did actually do that. And as I grew older although that belief faded away in the light of the obvious ‘fact’ of the medical model, it never truly disappeared. Time and again I would reflect on what it meant to be healthy and when my own health challenges began in my mid-teens, some part of me always knew that my mother’s kiss held meaning. I remember being 16 years old and just about to sit ‘O’ levels, as they were then. I had been having a period for what must have been weeks and I was tired a...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - June 25, 2020 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Health life miracle Source Type: news

Overlooked Virus Killer
Sales of vitamin C supplements have tripled in the last few weeks… And the most powerful kind of vitamin C is sold out on Amazon. (More on that in a minute.) I’m glad to see people turning to vitamin C. But the the chewable form you usually find at the drugstore won’t give you the boost you’re looking for. You see, absorption — or bioavailability — is an issue, and your body can only absorb about 500 mg of this conventional form of vitamin C before you hit saturation. And that’s nowhere near enough. In a moment I’ll show you a better form of vitamin C… and how you can take ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 6, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr.A.Sears Tags: Health Nutrition Source Type: news

Sodium reduction in Turkey breast meat by using sodium anion species
This study aims at reducing the overall sodium content in turkey meat application by using alternative sodium species. Initial experiments studied the sodium absorption across the temperature range of 4 to 90 °C which showed higher sodium content for thermally processed samples over a longer cooking time. Overall, the adsorption rate was found to be slower and was not affected by protein denaturation. Additional experiments studied the sodium diffusion by replacing sodium chloride with alternative sodium salts with comparatively larger anions, which resulted in, 20–46% reduction in overall sodium content of thermally ...
Source: LWT Food Science and Technology - February 4, 2020 Category: Food Science Source Type: research

Cardiometabolic disease costs associated with suboptimal diet in the United States: A cost analysis based on a microsimulation model
ConclusionsSuboptimal diet of 10 dietary factors accounts for 18.2% of all ischemic heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes costs in the US, highlighting that timely implementation of diet policies could address these health and economic burdens.
Source: PLoS Medicine - December 16, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Thiago Veiga Jardim Source Type: research

Why You Should Start Thinking About Your Cholesterol Earlier
High cholesterol is known to be one of the primary risk factors for heart disease, since it can contribute to plaque buildup in the arteries. But even though the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends regular cholesterol testing starting around age 20, many Americans don’t give cholesterol—or heart disease, for that matter—much thought until later in life. A new modeling study published in the Lancet gives extra reason not to put off cholesterol screening and treatment. It confirms that high blood levels of “bad” (or non-HDL) cholesterol are associated with a greater risk o...
Source: TIME: Health - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Meat, Fish, and Vegetables: New Data on Heart Disease and Stroke Meat, Fish, and Vegetables: New Data on Heart Disease and Stroke
Dr Christoph Diener on interesting new results in stroke, epilepsy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and more.Medscape Neurology
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - November 2, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Commentary Source Type: news

Association between CPR-related genetic variants and risk of ischemic stroke: a nested case-control study.
Conclusions: Our study showed genetic variants of CRP-related genes were associated with risk of ischemic stroke. Our findings could provide useful data for the etiology of ischemic stroke. PMID: 31584351 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Neurological Research - October 5, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurol Res Source Type: research

Mayo Clinic Minute: Does eating red meat affect heart health?
Red meat consumption has long been associated with increased risk of diseases, such as heart attack and stroke. A new study suggests that meat may not be so bad after all. Nevertheless, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, says that limiting red meat in your diet is still important for heart health. Watch: The [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 3, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk for All-Cause Mortality and Cardiometabolic Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies.
Conclusion: The magnitude of association between red and processed meat consumption and all-cause mortality and adverse cardiometabolic outcomes is very small, and the evidence is of low certainty. Primary Funding Source: None. (PROSPERO: CRD42017074074). PMID: 31569213 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - September 30, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Zeraatkar D, Han MA, Guyatt GH, Vernooij RWM, El Dib R, Cheung K, Milio K, Zworth M, Bartoszko JJ, Valli C, Rabassa M, Lee Y, Zajac J, Prokop-Dorner A, Lo C, Bala MM, Alonso-Coello P, Hanna SE, Johnston BC Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research

Vegetarians Have Higher Risk for Stroke, Lower Heart Disease Risk Vegetarians Have Higher Risk for Stroke, Lower Heart Disease Risk
People who follow vegetarian or vegan diets may have lower odds for heart disease but higher chances of having a stroke, compared to meat eaters, a large UK study suggests.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - September 27, 2019 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Vegetarians have higher risk for stroke, lower heart disease risk
(Reuters Health) - People who follow vegetarian or vegan diets may have lower odds for heart disease but higher chances of having a stroke, compared to meat eaters, a large UK study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - September 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Study Reveals Mixed Effects on Health for Vegetarian Diet
FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 -- Vegetarians and fish eaters have a lower risk for ischemic heart disease compared with meat eaters, and vegetarians have a higher risk for stroke, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in The BMJ. Tammy Y.N. Tong,...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 6, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Vegetarians May Face Higher Stroke Risk
While vegetarians had a 22% lower risk for heart disease, they had a 20% higher risk for stroke, British researchers found. Meanwhile, people who ate fish but no other meats (pescatarians) had a 13% lower risk of heart disease, with no increased stroke risk.
Source: WebMD Health - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vegetarians May Be At Higher Risk Of Stroke, Study Finds
BOSTON (CBS) – Many people adopt a vegetarian lifestyle to help reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease, but a new study published in the BMJ finds people who avoid meat all together may be at a higher risk of stroke. Researchers in the U.K. looked at about 48 thousand adults over 18 years. They found that vegetarians, vegans, and pescatarians (people who eat fish but not meat) had a lower risk of ischemic heart disease, like heart attacks. But vegetarians had a 20% higher risk of stroke compared to meat eaters. It’s not clear why vegetarians may suffer more strokes. Perhaps it is due to lower levels of cer...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Stroke Vegetarian Source Type: news

A New Study Suggests Vegetarians and Vegans Are at Higher Risk of Stroke. But Don ’t Reach for That Steak Just Yet
Vegetarians and vegans are likely to be concerned by the results of a new study with a surprising finding: those following meat-free diets, which are typically associated with better cardiovascular health, may actually have a higher risk of stroke than those who eat meat. But it’s too soon to run out and order a steak. The paper, published in the BMJ, found only a small increase in the risk of stroke, while confirming findings in other studies that vegetarians and vegans may have a lower risk of heart disease than meat-eaters. “It’s important to emphasize that we’ve looked at two outcomes here,R...
Source: TIME: Health - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition onetime Source Type: news

Going Vegetarian Good for Your Heart, But May Up Stroke Risk
THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 -- Vegetarianism is all the rage these days, but a new study suggests that slicing meat from your diet might raise your risk of stroke slightly. While vegetarians had a 22% lower risk for heart disease, they had a 20% higher...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Risks of ischaemic heart disease and stroke in meat eaters, fish eaters, and vegetarians over 18 years of follow-up: results from the prospective EPIC-Oxford study
Source: BMJ - September 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

Vegetarians might have higher risk of stroke than meat eaters, study says
Non-meat diets have soared in popularity with many people ditching beef, pork and chicken in pursuit of health and environmental benefits and concerns about animal welfare.
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vegetarians have a higher risk of stroke than meat eaters
Oxford University scientists, who tracked nearly 50,000 people for 18 years, believe low intake of the vitamins in meat may cause the additional risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vegetarians and pescatarians have lower risk of CHD
Vegetarians also have a fifth higher risk of haemorrhagic and total stroke compared with meat eaters Related items fromOnMedica WHO dietary fat guidance fails to consider crucial evidence Most supplements offer no real benefit, some might increase risks Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Vitamin D supplements do not confer cardiovascular protection Sweetened drinks greater risk for poor glycaemic control
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

White Meat Is Just As Bad For Cholesterol Levels As Red Beef, Study Says
(CNN) — The red meat or white meat debate is a draw: Eating white meat, such as poultry, will have an identical effect on your cholesterol level as eating red beef, new research indicates. The long-held belief that eating white meat is less harmful for your heart may still hold true, because there may be other effects from eating red meat that contribute to cardiovascular disease, said the University of California, San Francisco researchers. This needs to be explored in more detail, they added. Non-meat proteins such as vegetables, dairy, and legumes, including beans, show the best cholesterol benefit, according to t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cholesterol CNN Red Meat Source Type: news

Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Cardiac Remodeling and Dysfunction
Patients with diabetes, a methionine-rich meat diet, or certain genetic polymorphisms show elevated levels of homocysteine (Hcy), which is strongly associated with the development of cardiovascular disease including diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, reducing Hcy with folate shows no beneficial cardiac effects. We have previously shown that hydrogen sulfide (H₂S), a byproduct of Hcy through transsulfuration by cystathionine beta synthase (CBS), donor mitigates Hcy-induced hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. However, the in vivo cardiac effects of H₂S in the context of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) have not been studied. We tes...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - May 23, 2019 Category: Physiology Source Type: research

Intake of 12 food groups and disability-adjusted life years from coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and colorectal cancer in 16 European countries
AbstractOur aim was to estimate and rank 12 food groups according to disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and colorectal cancer (CRC) in 16 European countries. De novo published non-linear dose –response meta-analyses of prospective studies (based on 297 primary reports), and food consumption data from the European Food Safety Authority Comprehensive European Food Consumption Database in Exposure Assessment, and DALY estimates from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation were use d. By implementing disease-specific counterfactual scenarios of the...
Source: European Journal of Epidemiology - April 26, 2019 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Want to Live Longer? Science Says to Do These 5 Things
When it comes to staying healthy, most people have the same motivation: living as long and fulfilling a life as possible. And while science has yet to find a true fountain of youth, researchers have identified certain behaviors that can increase longevity. One study, published in the journal Circulation last year, even argued that adhering to just five healthy habits could extend your lifespan by roughly a decade. Here’s what they are, and what research to date says about living your longest life. Eating a healthy diet Diet is strongly linked to longevity. Research has long suggested that following a Mediterranean di...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Longevity Source Type: news

6-Bromoindirubin-3 ′-Oxime (6BIO) Suppresses the mTOR Pathway, Promotes Autophagy, and Exerts Anti-aging Effects in Rodent Liver
In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-aging effect, and molecular mechanism, of the novel anti-aging drug 6BIO on naturally aged mouse liver. Rapamycin, a well-known promising anti-aging drug that delays aging through mTOR-dependent autophagy (Zhou and Ye, 2018), was used as the positive control in the study. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the effects of 6BIO treatment in models of natural aging. Our results indicated that 6BIO ameliorates the decline of liver function with age, including lipid metabolism disorder, and attenuates hepatocyte senescence in aged mice, as revealed by altera...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - April 9, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

Trans fatty acids and lipid profile: A serious risk factor to cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes
The objective of the review to demonstrate the causal association between trans fatty acid intake and increase the risk of coronary heart disease through their influence on lipoprotein, association with atherosclerosis, stroke, diabetes and cancer.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - March 17, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

Eggs May Be Bad for the Heart, a New Study Says —But There’s More to the Story
Conclusions about eggs based on available scientific evidence vary widely — in part because nutrition research is notoriously hard to conduct accurately. Despite the entrenched belief that eggs raise cholesterol, some studies have suggested that dietary cholesterol intake doesn’t necessarily translate to higher blood cholesterol. One study from last year found that people who ate an egg per day had lower rates of heart disease and bleeding stroke than people who did not eat them, and research from 2016 found that eggs didn’t have a strong effect on risk of coronary artery disease. Some researchers have su...
Source: TIME: Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Mediterranean-style diet for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite the relatively large number of studies included in this review, there is still some uncertainty regarding the effects of a Mediterranean-style diet on clinical endpoints and CVD risk factors for both primary and secondary prevention. The quality of evidence for the modest benefits on CVD risk factors in primary prevention is low or moderate, with a small number of studies reporting minimal harms. There is a paucity of evidence for secondary prevention. The ongoing studies may provide more certainty in the future. PMID: 30864165 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - March 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Rees K, Takeda A, Martin N, Ellis L, Wijesekara D, Vepa A, Das A, Hartley L, Stranges S Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

The Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Health.
Abstract The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), abundant in minimally processed plant-based foods, rich in monounsaturated fat from olive oil, but lower in saturated fat, meats, and dairy products, seems an ideal nutritional model for cardiovascular health. Methodological aspects of Mediterranean intervention trials, limitations in the quality of some meta-analyses, and other issues may have raised recent controversies. It remains unclear whether such limitations are important enough as to attenuate the postulated cardiovascular benefits of the MedDiet. We aimed to critically review current evidence on the role of the ...
Source: Circulation Research - February 28, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Martínez-González MA, Gea A, Ruiz-Canela M Tags: Circ Res Source Type: research

‘ Planetary Health Diet ’ : Scientists Say Cutting Red Meat, Sugar Can Save Lives And The Planet
(CNN) — An international team of scientists has developed a diet it says can improve health while ensuring sustainable food production to reduce further damage to the planet. The “planetary health diet” is based on cutting red meat and sugar consumption in half and upping intake of fruits, vegetables and nuts. And it can prevent up to 11.6 million premature deaths without harming the planet, says the report published Wednesday in the medical journal The Lancet. The authors warn that a global change in diet and food production is needed as 3 billion people across the world are malnourished — which in...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Source Type: news

Eating habits in the population of the Aeolian Islands: an observational study.
CONCLUSIONS: Study findings show the eating habits and health status of the Aeolian people in an interesting setting of low incidence of cerebrovascular disease. This nutrition regimen has been proved to be protective against cerebrovascular disease. Nutrition is likely to contribute to the low incidence of stroke in this population. PMID: 30585144 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Public Health Nutrition - December 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: La Spina P, Savica R, Ciacciarelli A, Cotroneo M, Dell'Aera C, Grillo F, Casella C, Fazio MC, Trimarchi G, Musolino RF Tags: Public Health Nutr Source Type: research

‘ Meat Taxes ’ Would Save Lives And Cut Health Care Costs, Study Says
(CNN) — It would drive up the price of your barbecue but a global “meat tax” could save 220,000 lives and cut health care bills by $41 billion each year, according to a new study. The numbers are based on evidence that links meat consumption to increased risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Three years ago, the World Health Organization declared red meat such as beef, lamb and pork to be carcinogenic when eaten in processed forms, including sausages, bacon and beef jerky. Health officials have also declared that unprocessed red meat like steak and burgers are “probably” carcinog...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Offbeat Local TV Meat Source Type: news

10 Ways to Keep Your Heart Healthy
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Lombardi and Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news

The cooking therapy for cognitive rehabilitation of cerebellar damage: A case report and a review of the literature
ConclusionThe comparison of our data with those reported in previous studies confirmed the Schmahmann’s hypothesis on the effectiveness of neurorehabilitation approaches in cerebellar patients acting as external timekeeping of conscious thoughts.Graphical abstractThe cooking therapy framework for the rehabilitation of the cerebellar patients. The patient underwent 18 levels divided into three courses (starter, pasta, and main) X 2 food meals (meat-fish) X 3 levels of difficulty (1°–2°–3° meal). Tomato sauce is the main food, which is prepared each time for every single meal. All cooking levels started with the pre...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - October 16, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

‘ Take Action ’ : Dave McGillivray ’s Message To Anyone Ignoring Symptoms Of Heart Disease
BOSTON (CBS) – There aren’t many people who run their age in miles every year. Dave McGillivray does. From the time he was a boy, he’s celebrated his good health and love of running with a personal challenge that obviously gets more challenging with age. His last “full” birthday run was last year: 63 miles. This year, by necessity, he split the effort into 32 miles of running and 32 miles of biking. A feat, to be sure. But this year, he is facing a challenge for which there is no training. McGillivray, arguably one of the most fit people on the planet, has coronary artery disease and is preparing to undergo ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dave McGillivray Lisa Hughes Mass General Hospital Source Type: news

Mediterranean-style diet may lower women's stroke risk
(University of East Anglia) Following a Mediterranean-style diet may reduce stroke risk in women over 40 but not in men -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia.A new report, published today in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke, reveals that a diet high in fish, fruit, vegetables, nuts and beans, and lower in meat and dairy, reduces stroke risk among white adults who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Preventable Heart Problems Killed 415,000 People in 2016. Here ’s How to Keep Your Heart Healthy
Heart problems that were “largely preventable” killed around 415,000 Americans in 2016, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says, highlighting the importance of proactive interventions. Under its new Million Hearts campaign, which aims to prevent a million heart attacks and strokes by 2022, the CDC looked at 2016 data and identified approximately 2.2 million hospitalizations and 415,000 deaths caused by heart attacks, strokes, heart failure and related conditions that likely could have been avoided. The total number of deaths related to heart issues is even higher — in 2015,...
Source: TIME: Health - September 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease onetime Source Type: news

Dominant modifiable risk factors for stroke in Ghana and Nigeria (SIREN): a case-control study
Publication date: Available online 26 February 2018 Source:The Lancet Global Health Author(s): Mayowa O Owolabi, Fred Sarfo, Rufus Akinyemi, Mulugeta Gebregziabher, Onoja Akpa, Albert Akpalu, Kolawole Wahab, Reginald Obiako, Lukman Owolabi, Bruce Ovbiagele Background Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence, prevalence, and fatality from stroke globally. Yet, only little information about context-specific risk factors for prioritising interventions to reduce the stroke burden in sub-Saharan Africa is available. We aimed to identify and characterise the effect of the top modifiable risk factors for stroke in sub-Sahara...
Source: The Lancet Global Health - February 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Stroke and food groups: an overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.
CONCLUSIONS: The current overview provided a high level of evidence to support the beneficial effect of specific foods on stroke outcome. Clinicians and policy makers could inform clinical practice and policy based on this overview. PMID: 29143697 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Public Health Nutrition - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Deng C, Lu Q, Gong B, Li L, Chang L, Fu L, Zhao Y Tags: Public Health Nutr Source Type: research

A case-control study on red meat consumption and risk of stroke among a group of Iranian adults.
CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of red meat was associated with greater odds of having stroke in a group of Iranian adults. PMID: 24924876 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Public Health Nutrition - June 13, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Saneei P, Saadatnia M, Shakeri F, Beykverdi M, Keshteli AH, Esmaillzadeh A Tags: Public Health Nutr Source Type: research