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Drug: Magnesium
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Total 24 results found since Jan 2013.

Intake of potassium- and magnesium-enriched salt improves functional outcome after stroke: a randomized, multicenter, double-blind controlled trial.
Conclusions: This study suggests that providing the DRI amount of magnesium and potassium together long term is beneficial for stroke patient recovery from neurologic deficits. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02910427. PMID: 28877896 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition - September 6, 2017 Category: Nutrition Authors: Pan WH, Lai YH, Yeh WT, Chen JR, Jeng JS, Bai CH, Lin RT, Lee TH, Chang KC, Lin HJ, Hsiao CF, Chern CM, Lien LM, Liu CH, Chen WH, Chang A Tags: Am J Clin Nutr Source Type: research

Intake of potassium- and magnesium-enriched salt improves functional outcome after stroke: a randomized, multicenter, double-blind controlled trial Vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals
Conclusions: This study suggests that providing the DRI amount of magnesium and potassium together long term is beneficial for stroke patient recovery from neurologic deficits. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02910427.
Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition - November 1, 2017 Category: Nutrition Authors: Pan, W.-H., Lai, Y.-H., Yeh, W.-T., Chen, J.-R., Jeng, J.-S., Bai, C.-H., Lin, R.-T., Lee, T.-H., Chang, K.-C., Lin, H.-J., Hsiao, C.-F., Chern, C.-M., Lien, L.-M., Liu, C.-H., Chen, W.-H., Chang, A. Tags: Research Need: Role of Nutrition in Medical Management Vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals Source Type: research

Calcium and magnesium in drinking water and risk of myocardial infarction and stroke - a population-based cohort study
CONCLUSION: Drinking water with a high concentration of calcium and magnesium, particularly magnesium, may lower the risk of stroke in postmenopausal women.PMID:35816459 | DOI:10.1093/ajcn/nqac186
Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition - July 11, 2022 Category: Nutrition Authors: Emilie Helte Melle S äve-Söderbergh Susanna C Larsson Agneta Åkesson Source Type: research

Predictive role of modifiable factors in stroke: an umbrella review
Discussion Diet with rich macronutrients and micronutrients, healthy dietary patterns and favourable physical, emotional health and environmental management should be promoted to decrease the burden of stroke. PROSPERO registration number CRD42021249921.
Source: BMJ Open - June 16, 2022 Category: General Medicine Authors: Wang, X., Liang, M., Zeng, F., Wang, Y., Yang, Y., Nie, F., Shang, M., Ta, N., Wen, L., Ou, L., Yang, Z., Liu, W. Tags: Open access, Neurology Source Type: research

Orally Administered Crocin Protects Against Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Through the Metabolic Transformation of Crocetin by Gut Microbiota
Conclusion Collectively, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic association studies provide evidence that the gut microbiota plays a vital role in the fate of crocin and crocetin in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, the cross-interaction between gut microbiota and crocin might mediate the activation of the cerebral-protective effect of orally administered crocin. Ethics Statement This study was carried out in accordance with the recommendations of ‘Institutional Animal Research Committee guidelines, Animal Ethics Committee of China Pharmaceutical University.’ The protocol was approved by the ‘An...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - April 29, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

Why Whole-Fat Milk and Yogurt Are Healthier Than You Think
For years, experts have recommended low-fat dairy products over the full-fat versions, which are higher in calories and contain more saturated fat. Recent research, however, indicates that full-fat dairy may actually be healthier than its reputation suggests, and that people who eat full-fat dairy are not more likely to develop cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes than people who consume low-fat dairy. They may even be less likely to gain weight. Now, new research published Tuesday in The Lancet, adds to that body of evidence. The research suggests that eating dairy products of all kinds is associated with a lower ri...
Source: TIME: Health - September 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Urinary element profiles and associations with cardiometabolic diseases: A cross-sectional study across ten areas in China
CONCLUSION: In China, the urinary levels of several toxic metals were significantly associated with the consumption of specific food groups and the risk of cardiometabolic diseases including diabetes and stroke.PMID:34896320 | DOI:10.1016/j.envres.2021.112535
Source: Environmental Research - December 13, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Lijiao Xu Yunan Liu Qianyu Zhao Huaidong Du Ying Gao Meijuan Bai Jun Lv Yu Guo Liming Li Liang Sun Xu Lin Zhengming Chen Yan Chen Geng Zong Source Type: research

Dietary magnesium intake and risk of incident coronary heart disease in men: A prospective cohort study
The associations between dietary magnesium intake and stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) incidences are inconsistent and not established in Asian. We aimed to determine investigated the association between dietary magnesium intake and the risk of stroke and CHD in a Japanese population.
Source: Clinical Nutrition - August 12, 2017 Category: Nutrition Authors: Yoshihiro Kokubo, Isao Saito, Hiroyasu Iso, Kazumasa Yamagishi, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Junko Ishihara, Koutatsu Maruyama, Manami Inoue, Norie Sawada, Shoichiro Tsugane, JPHC Study Group Source Type: research

This diet advice could kill you
The American Heart Association says sodium in salt raises blood pressure. They say it increases the risk for heart disease and stroke.  But the latest science says otherwise… A British review of 34 clinical trials showed that cutting down on salt reduced blood pressure only slightly for people with hypertension.1  And a new study in The Lancet found that some low-salt diets could put you at GREATER risk of heart disease and death.2 Researchers analyzed data from 133,118 people. They wanted to see if there was a link between high sodium and heart attack, stroke and death The results were startling. People on “he...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Health Heart Health Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Source Type: news

Dietary magnesium intake and risk of incident coronary heart disease in men: A prospective cohort study
The associations between dietary magnesium intake and stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) incidences are inconsistent and not established in Asian. We aimed to determine the association between dietary magnesium intake and the risk of stroke and CHD in a Japanese population.
Source: Clinical Nutrition - August 12, 2017 Category: Nutrition Authors: Yoshihiro Kokubo, Isao Saito, Hiroyasu Iso, Kazumasa Yamagishi, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Junko Ishihara, Koutatsu Maruyama, Manami Inoue, Norie Sawada, Shoichiro Tsugane, the JPHC Study Group Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Grading of Japanese Diet Intakes by 24-Hour Urine Analysis of Taurine and Soy Isoflavones in Relation to Cardiovascular Risks
In conclusion, the higher the J score, which corresponds to Japanese dietary habits, the lower the BMI and cholesterol levels, as well as mortality rate from coronary heart disease, but the higher the average life expectancy among the Japanese. However, these higher J scorings were associated with high-salt intake and high Na/K ratios; therefore, they contributed to high blood pressure and high mortality rate caused by stroke in Japan. These results indicate that low-salt intake should be recommended to the Japanese who are consuming seafood and soy regularly in order to maintain lower blood pressure and to extend healthy ...
Source: Adv Data - July 26, 2022 Category: Epidemiology Authors: Mari Mori Miki Sagara Hideki Mori Yukio Yamori Source Type: research