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Dietary Cholesterol and Cardiovascular Risk: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.
sis and Vascular Biology; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease; and Stroke Council Abstract The elimination of specific dietary cholesterol target recommendations in recent guidelines has raised questions about its role with respect to cardiovascular disease. This advisory was developed after a review of human studies on the relationship of dietary cholesterol with blood lipids, lipoproteins, and cardiovascular disease risk to address questions about the relevance of dietary cholesterol guidance for heart health. Evidence from observat...
Source: Circulation - December 16, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Carson JAS, Lichtenstein AH, Anderson CAM, Appel LJ, Kris-Etherton PM, Meyer KA, Petersen K, Polonsky T, Van Horn L, American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Arteriosclerosis, Thromb Tags: Circulation Source Type: research

Why You Should Start Thinking About Your Cholesterol Earlier
High cholesterol is known to be one of the primary risk factors for heart disease, since it can contribute to plaque buildup in the arteries. But even though the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends regular cholesterol testing starting around age 20, many Americans don’t give cholesterol—or heart disease, for that matter—much thought until later in life. A new modeling study published in the Lancet gives extra reason not to put off cholesterol screening and treatment. It confirms that high blood levels of “bad” (or non-HDL) cholesterol are associated with a greater risk o...
Source: TIME: Health - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Dairy foods and health: an umbrella review of observational studies.
In conclusions, dairy may be part of a healthy diet; however, additional studies exploring confounding factors are needed to ascertain the potential detrimental effects. PMID: 31199182 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition - June 16, 2019 Category: Nutrition Tags: Int J Food Sci Nutr Source Type: research

White Meat Is Just As Bad For Cholesterol Levels As Red Beef, Study Says
(CNN) — The red meat or white meat debate is a draw: Eating white meat, such as poultry, will have an identical effect on your cholesterol level as eating red beef, new research indicates. The long-held belief that eating white meat is less harmful for your heart may still hold true, because there may be other effects from eating red meat that contribute to cardiovascular disease, said the University of California, San Francisco researchers. This needs to be explored in more detail, they added. Non-meat proteins such as vegetables, dairy, and legumes, including beans, show the best cholesterol benefit, according to t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cholesterol CNN Red Meat Source Type: news

More Research Is Needed on Lifestyle Behaviors That Influence Progression of Parkinson's Disease
This article highlights some of these challenges in the design of lifestyle studies in PD, and suggests a more coordinated international effort is required, including ongoing longitudinal observational studies. In combination with pharmaceutical treatments, healthy lifestyle behaviors may slow the progression of PD, empower patients, and reduce disease burden. For optimal care of people with PD, it is important to close this gap in current knowledge and discover whether such associations exist. Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related complex progressive neurodegenerative disorder, with key p...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - April 30, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

Modifiable Lifestyle Factors and Cognitive Function in Older People: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study
Conclusions: Lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, sleep, and social activity appear to be associated with cognitive function among older people. Physical activity and appropriate durations of sleep and conversation are important for cognitive function. Introduction Dementia is a major public health issue worldwide, with a serious burden for patients, caregivers, and society, as well as substantial economic impacts (1). Although the prevalence of late-life cognitive impairment and dementia are expected to increase in future, effective disease-modifying treatments are currently unavailable. Therefore, unders...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - April 24, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

C-Reactive Protein and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Conclusions: This meta-analysis revealed that PD is associated with an increase of CRP levels. CRP might be a risk factor for PD or PD leads to an inflammatory response. Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most complex neuro-degenerative disorders next to Alzheimer's disease. It is characterized by bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity, abnormal postural, and gait (1). PD has been recognized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta, whereas the exact etiology remains elusive (2). Previously, multiple inferences have reviewed the environmental a...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - April 17, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

Trans fatty acids and lipid profile: A serious risk factor to cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes
The objective of the review to demonstrate the causal association between trans fatty acid intake and increase the risk of coronary heart disease through their influence on lipoprotein, association with atherosclerosis, stroke, diabetes and cancer.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - March 17, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

Eggs May Be Bad for the Heart, a New Study Says —But There’s More to the Story
Conclusions about eggs based on available scientific evidence vary widely — in part because nutrition research is notoriously hard to conduct accurately. Despite the entrenched belief that eggs raise cholesterol, some studies have suggested that dietary cholesterol intake doesn’t necessarily translate to higher blood cholesterol. One study from last year found that people who ate an egg per day had lower rates of heart disease and bleeding stroke than people who did not eat them, and research from 2016 found that eggs didn’t have a strong effect on risk of coronary artery disease. Some researchers have su...
Source: TIME: Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Substitutions between dairy products and risk of stroke: Results from the EPIC-NL cohort.
In conclusion, whole-fat yoghurt as a substitution for low-fat yoghurt, cheese, butter, buttermilk or milk regardless of fat content was associated with a lower rate of ischemic stroke. PMID: 30868976 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Nutrition - March 14, 2019 Category: Nutrition Authors: Laursen ASD, Sluijs I, Boer JMA, Verschuren WMM, van der Schouw YT, Jakobsen MU Tags: Br J Nutr Source Type: research

Mediterranean-style diet for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: Despite the relatively large number of studies included in this review, there is still some uncertainty regarding the effects of a Mediterranean-style diet on clinical endpoints and CVD risk factors for both primary and secondary prevention. The quality of evidence for the modest benefits on CVD risk factors in primary prevention is low or moderate, with a small number of studies reporting minimal harms. There is a paucity of evidence for secondary prevention. The ongoing studies may provide more certainty in the future. PMID: 30864165 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - March 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Rees K, Takeda A, Martin N, Ellis L, Wijesekara D, Vepa A, Das A, Hartley L, Stranges S Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

The Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Health.
Abstract The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), abundant in minimally processed plant-based foods, rich in monounsaturated fat from olive oil, but lower in saturated fat, meats, and dairy products, seems an ideal nutritional model for cardiovascular health. Methodological aspects of Mediterranean intervention trials, limitations in the quality of some meta-analyses, and other issues may have raised recent controversies. It remains unclear whether such limitations are important enough as to attenuate the postulated cardiovascular benefits of the MedDiet. We aimed to critically review current evidence on the role of the ...
Source: Circulation Research - March 1, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Martínez-González MA, Gea A, Ruiz-Canela M Tags: Circ Res Source Type: research

Products made from whole milk, not 2% "processed" milk, reduce risk of blood clots in the brain
(Natural News) A study published in the European Journal of Epidemiology reveals that soured whole milk products are more effective at reducing the risk of suffering from brain thrombosis or ischemic stroke compared with other dairy products — such as low-fat soured milk products and cheese, buttermilk, or milk — with varying fat percentages. A team of researchers at...
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Planetary Health Diet ’ : Scientists Say Cutting Red Meat, Sugar Can Save Lives And The Planet
(CNN) — An international team of scientists has developed a diet it says can improve health while ensuring sustainable food production to reduce further damage to the planet. The “planetary health diet” is based on cutting red meat and sugar consumption in half and upping intake of fruits, vegetables and nuts. And it can prevent up to 11.6 million premature deaths without harming the planet, says the report published Wednesday in the medical journal The Lancet. The authors warn that a global change in diet and food production is needed as 3 billion people across the world are malnourished — which in...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Source Type: news

Cone Health employs teleneurology at MedCenter High Point
Cone Health is implementing technology to better care for High Point patients with stroke, seizure, headaches and other neurological disorders.   MedCenter High Point at 2630 Willard Dairy Road, will use teleneurology to connect doctors and nurses in the emergency department and other areas throughout the hospital with on-call neurologists. The service is part of Cone Health Neurosciences and is a partnership with Atrium Health and TeleS pecialists.  Cone Health says the technology solves two…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John Joyce Source Type: news

Dairy Consumption and Cardiometabolic Diseases: Systematic Review and Updated Meta-Analyses of Prospective Cohort Studies
AbstractPurpose of ReviewDairy products contain both beneficial and harmful nutrients in relation to cardiometabolic diseases. Here, we provide the latest scientific evidence regarding the relationship between dairy products and cardiometabolic diseases by reviewing the literature and updating meta-analyses of observational studies.Recent FindingsWe updated our previous meta-analyses of cohort studies on type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), and stroke with nine studies and confirmed previous results. Total dairy and low-fat dairy (per 200  g/d) were inversely associated with a 3–4% lower risk of diabetes. Yogu...
Source: Current Nutrition Reports - November 8, 2018 Category: Nutrition Source Type: research

10 Ways to Keep Your Heart Healthy
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Lombardi and Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news

Mediterranean-style diet may lower women's stroke risk
(University of East Anglia) Following a Mediterranean-style diet may reduce stroke risk in women over 40 but not in men -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia.A new report, published today in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke, reveals that a diet high in fish, fruit, vegetables, nuts and beans, and lower in meat and dairy, reduces stroke risk among white adults who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Research Shows Eating More Dairy Lowers Your Risk Of Heart Disease
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study in the Lancet finds that milk really does a body good. Researchers found that eating more dairy is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, including whole-fat dairy foods like whole milk and full fat yogurt. Researchers surveyed more than 130,000 people in 21 countries over about nine years. They found that compared to people who don’t eat dairy, those who consume up to three servings a day have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, and premature death from cardiovascular disease. Most experts recommend people get 2-4 servings a day of low or non-fat dairy, saying whole fat dairy ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dairy Dr. Mallika Marshall Milk Source Type: news

Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study
Publication date: Available online 11 September 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Mahshid Dehghan, Andrew Mente, Sumathy Rangarajan, Patrick Sheridan, Viswanathan Mohan, Romaina Iqbal, Rajeev Gupta, Scott Lear, Edelweiss Wentzel-Viljoen, Alvaro Avezum, Patricio Lopez-Jaramillo, Prem Mony, Ravi Prasad Varma, Rajesh Kumar, Jephat Chifamba, Khalid F Alhabib, Noushin Mohammadifard, Aytekin Oguz, Fernando Lanas, Dorota RozanskaSummaryBackgroundDietary guidelines recommend minimising consumption of whole-fat dairy products, as they are a source of saturated fats and presumed to adversely affect blood lipids and increase cardiovas...
Source: The Lancet - September 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

It’s a moo-turn as experts say whole-fat dairy cuts heart risk
A DAILY glass of milk, a pot of yogurt old advice and knob of butter lowers the risk of heart disease and helps people live longer, experts said yesterday. Three servings of dairy a day, including whole fats such as milk, cheese, butter and cream, is associated with lower rates of heart disease and stroke, a study found.
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Glass of milk, a cup of yogurt and a pad of butter could lower your risk of heart disease
A new study from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, has found that eating three servings of dairy a day makes you two times less likely to suffer a stroke or from heart disease.
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Even High-Fat Dairy Might Be Good for You
The study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, but folks who ate three servings of dairy per day had an overall lower risk of death during the study period than people who ate no dairy. They also had a lower risk of stroke and death from heart disease, researchers found.
Source: WebMD Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Whole-Fat Milk and Yogurt Are Healthier Than You Think
For years, experts have recommended low-fat dairy products over the full-fat versions, which are higher in calories and contain more saturated fat. Recent research, however, indicates that full-fat dairy may actually be healthier than its reputation suggests, and that people who eat full-fat dairy are not more likely to develop cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes than people who consume low-fat dairy. They may even be less likely to gain weight. Now, new research published Tuesday in The Lancet, adds to that body of evidence. The research suggests that eating dairy products of all kinds is associated with a lower ri...
Source: TIME: Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Preventable Heart Problems Killed 415,000 People in 2016. Here ’s How to Keep Your Heart Healthy
Heart problems that were “largely preventable” killed around 415,000 Americans in 2016, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says, highlighting the importance of proactive interventions. Under its new Million Hearts campaign, which aims to prevent a million heart attacks and strokes by 2022, the CDC looked at 2016 data and identified approximately 2.2 million hospitalizations and 415,000 deaths caused by heart attacks, strokes, heart failure and related conditions that likely could have been avoided. The total number of deaths related to heart issues is even higher — in 2015,...
Source: TIME: Health - September 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease onetime Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Full-fat dairy may actually benefit heart health
New research challenges the widely held belief that full-fat dairy must be avoided. In fact, some types of dairy may even prevent stroke, says the study.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Saturated fats in dairy do not increase the risk of heart disease
Researchers from the University of Texas, Houston, found that eating full-fat dairy actually reduces the risk of dying from stroke by 42 percent. Yet guidelines recommend low-fat options.
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saturated fats in yoghurt, cheese and butter do NOT increase the risk of heart disease
Researchers from the University of Texas, Houston, found that eating full-fat dairy actually reduces the risk of dying from stroke by 42 percent. Yet guidelines recommend low-fat options.
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Serial measures of circulating biomarkers of dairy fat and total and cause-specific mortality in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study.
Conclusions: Long-term exposure to circulating phospholipid pentadecanoic, heptadecanoic, or trans-palmitoleic acids was not significantly associated with total mortality or incident CVD among older adults. High circulating heptadecanoic acid was inversely associated with CVD and stroke mortality and potentially associated with higher risk of non-CVD death. PMID: 30007304 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition - July 11, 2018 Category: Nutrition Authors: de Oliveira Otto MC, Lemaitre RN, Song X, King IB, Siscovick DS, Mozaffarian D Tags: Am J Clin Nutr Source Type: research

Change of heart dimensions and function during pregnancy in goats
Publication date: June 2018Source: Research in Veterinary Science, Volume 118Author(s): Olga Szaluś-Jordanow, Michał Czopowicz, Lucjan Witkowski, Agata Moroz, Marcin Mickiewicz, Tadeusz Frymus, Iwona Markowska-Daniel, Emilia Bagnicka, Jarosław KabaAbstractThe study aimed to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on heart diameters and function in goats. Transthoracic echocardiography of 12 female dairy goats of two Polish regional breeds was performed. A Mindray M7 diagnostic ultrasound system with Phased Array transducer was used. Simultaneously, electrocardiography was recorded. All animals were examined four times – at m...
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

Preventive Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation on Ischemic Stroke-Induced Constipation Mediated via the Autonomic Pathway.
CONCLUSION: Ischemic stroke patients are predisposed to autonomic function imbalance. TEA was effective in the prevention of stroke-induced constipation, and the effect was possibly mediated via the autonomic function. PMID: 29746169 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Am J Physiol Gastroi... - May 10, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Liu Z, Ge Y, Xu F, Xu Y, Liu Y, Xia F, Lin L, Chen JD Tags: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol Source Type: research

Estimation and Prediction of Avoidable Health Care Costs of Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Through Adequate Dairy Food Consumption: A Systematic Review and Micro Simulation Modeling Study.
CONCLUSION: Our analysis demonstrated that increasing dairy foods consumption to recommended levels would be associated with reductions in healthcare costs. Further randomized trial studies are required to investigate the effect of dairy foods intake on cost of CVD and T2DM in the population. PMID: 29738265 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Archives of Iranian Medicine - May 1, 2018 Category: Middle East Health Authors: Javanbakht M, Jamshidi AR, Baradaran HR, Mohammadi Z, Mashayekhi A, Shokraneh F, Rezai Hamami M, Yazdani Bakhsh R, Shabaninejad H, Delavari S, Tehrani A Tags: Arch Iran Med Source Type: research

Change of heart dimensions and function during pregnancy in goats
Publication date: June 2018 Source:Research in Veterinary Science, Volume 118 Author(s): Olga Szaluś-Jordanow, Michał Czopowicz, Lucjan Witkowski, Agata Moroz, Marcin Mickiewicz, Tadeusz Frymus, Iwona Markowska-Daniel, Emilia Bagnicka, Jarosław Kaba The study aimed to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on heart diameters and function in goats. Transthoracic echocardiography of 12 female dairy goats of two Polish regional breeds was performed. A Mindray M7 diagnostic ultrasound system with Phased Array transducer was used. Simultaneously, electrocardiography was recorded. All animals were examined four times – at mating...
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - April 10, 2018 Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

Dairy Products, Dairy Fatty Acids, and the Prevention of Cardiometabolic Disease: a Review of Recent Evidence
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTo examine recent literature on dairy products, dairy fatty acids, and cardiometabolic disease. Primary questions of interest include what unique challenges researchers face when investigating dairy products/biomarkers, whether one should consume dairy to reduce disease risk, whether dairy fatty acids may be beneficial for health, and whether one should prefer low- or high-fat dairy products.Recent FindingsDairy composes about 10% of the calories in a typical American diet, about half of that coming from fluid milk, half coming from cheese, and small amounts from yogurt. Most meta-analyses report n...
Source: Current Atherosclerosis Reports - March 21, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Which is Healthier: Being a Vegetarian or Eating a Mediterranean Diet?
The Mediterranean diet is consistently heralded as one of the most healthful eating styles. It’s heavy on produce, nuts, whole grains, olive oil and lean protein, and light on red meat, processed foods and refined sugars. But a new study finds that vegetarian diets may be just as good at keeping your heart healthy, according to a study published in the journal Circulation. For the study, a group of Italian researchers recruited 100 overweight but healthy adults with low-to-moderate cardiovascular risk profiles. Half the group started on a Mediterranean diet, while the other started on a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, wh...
Source: TIME: Health - February 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Adipose tissue fatty acids present in dairy fat and risk of stroke: the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort
ConclusionsOur results suggest that a larger percentage in adipose tissue of fatty acids for which dairy products are a major source is associated with a lower rate of ischemic stroke.
Source: European Journal of Nutrition - January 12, 2018 Category: Nutrition Source Type: research

Eating Cheese Daily May Be Good For You, Study Finds
CBS Local — Cheese fans around the world, rejoice! The study you’ve been waiting for has arrived. Researchers have found that eating cheese every day is good for your health and may decrease your chance of developing heart disease. The findings, published in December’s European Journal of Nutrition, looked at 15 separate studies that followed over 200,000 people in the U.S. and Europe. Researchers say people who ate large amounts of cheese lowered their risk of developing heart disease by 14 percent and were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke compared to people who didn’t eat cheese. “Che...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cheese Chris Melore Heart Disease Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Stroke and food groups: an overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.
CONCLUSIONS: The current overview provided a high level of evidence to support the beneficial effect of specific foods on stroke outcome. Clinicians and policy makers could inform clinical practice and policy based on this overview. PMID: 29143697 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Public Health Nutrition - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Deng C, Lu Q, Gong B, Li L, Chang L, Fu L, Zhao Y Tags: Public Health Nutr Source Type: research

Associations of Calcium and Dairy Products with All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Prospective Cohort Study.
Abstract Associations of calcium and dairy product intakes with cardiovascular disease risk and cancer mortality are controversial. We investigated associations of calcium and dairy product intakes with mortality in the prospective REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study (n = 30,239). Of 2,966 total deaths, 32.3% were from CVD and 28.8% from cancer. For those in the upper relative to the lowest quintile of intakes, from Cox proportional hazards regression models, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality were 1.13 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.95-1.35; P-trend ...
Source: Nutrition and Cancer - November 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Um CY, Judd SE, Flanders WD, Fedirko V, Bostick RM Tags: Nutr Cancer Source Type: research

Substitutions of dairy product intake and risk of stroke: a Danish cohort study
AbstractLow fat dairy products are part of dietary guidelines to prevent stroke. However, epidemiological evidence is inconclusive with regard to the association between dairy products and stroke. We therefore investigated associations for substitutions between dairy product subgroups and risk of total stroke and stroke subtypes. We included 55,211 Danish men and women aged 50 –64 years without previous stroke. Baseline diet was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Cases were identified through a national register and subsequently verified. The associations were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression. ...
Source: European Journal of Epidemiology - June 12, 2017 Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

Review finds no link between dairy and heart attack or stroke risk
Conclusion This large meta-analysis of cohort studies demonstrated no increased risk to cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease or all-cause death from eating dairy products. The review has strengths in its large size and the fact it was able to analyse different types of dairy product, such as high and low-fat and everyday products such as cheese and yoghurt. However, there are a number of factors to consider: The results of a systematic review are only as good as the quality of the underlying studies. These are all observational studies and it's possible that unadjusted health and lifestyle factors are having an...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news

Dairy Consumption and Risk of Stroke: A Systematic Review and Updated Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology
Conclusions Milk and cheese consumption were inversely associated with stroke risk. Results should be placed in the context of the observed heterogeneity. Future epidemiological studies should provide more details about dairy types, including fat content. In addition, the role of dairy in Asian populations deserves further attention.
Source: JAHA:Journal of the American Heart Association - May 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: de Goede, J., Soedamah-Muthu, S. S., Pan, A., Gijsbers, L., Geleijnse, J. M. Tags: Cardiovascular Disease Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Source Type: research

Dairy Consumption and Risk of Stroke: A Case‑control Study
Conclusions: We found a significant positive association between high‑fat dairy consumption and risk of stroke. Further prospective studies are required to confirm this finding.Keywords: Dairy intake, diet, food frequency questionnaire, stroke
Source: International Journal of Preventive Medicine - January 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Concerns about the use of 15:0, 17:0, and trans-16:1n-7 as biomarkers of dairy fat intake in recent observational studies that suggest beneficial effects of dairy food on incidence of diabetes and stroke.
PMID: 25934871 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition - May 1, 2015 Category: Nutrition Authors: Ratnayake WN Tags: Am J Clin Nutr Source Type: research

Circulating biomarkers of dairy fat and risk of incident stroke in U.S. men and women in 2 large prospective cohorts.
CONCLUSION: In 2 large prospective cohorts, circulating biomarkers of dairy fat were not significantly associated with stroke. PMID: 25411278 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition - November 21, 2014 Category: Nutrition Authors: Yakoob MY, Shi P, Hu FB, Campos H, Rexrode KM, Orav EJ, Willett WC, Mozaffarian D Tags: Am J Clin Nutr Source Type: research

Circulating biomarkers of dairy fat and risk of incident stroke in U.S. men and women in 2 large prospective cohorts Cardiovascular disease risk
Conclusion: In 2 large prospective cohorts, circulating biomarkers of dairy fat were not significantly associated with stroke.
Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition - November 19, 2014 Category: Nutrition Authors: Yakoob, M. Y., Shi, P., Hu, F. B., Campos, H., Rexrode, K. M., Orav, E. J., Willett, W. C., Mozaffarian, D. Tags: Cardiovascular disease risk Source Type: research

Dairy products and the risk of stroke and coronary heart disease: the Rotterdam Study
Conclusions In this long-term follow-up study of older Dutch subjects, total dairy consumption or the intake of specific dairy products was not related to the occurrence of CVD events. The observed inverse association between high-fat dairy and fatal stroke warrants confirmation in other studies.
Source: European Journal of Nutrition - October 9, 2014 Category: Nutrition Source Type: research