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Effects of a food preparation program on dietary well-being for stroke patients with dysphagia: A pilot study
Conclusions: The food preparation program showed a positive impact on dietary well-being and a potential improvement in the health-related quality of life, quality of life related to the process of swallowing, and nutritional status for stroke patients with dysphagia. We recommend that stroke patients with dysphagia receive adequate knowledge and hands-on food preparation training to increase their dietary intake and well-being.
Source: Medicine - June 25, 2021 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Trial/Experimental Study Source Type: research

Food as Prevention – Rising to Nutritional Challenges
Mothers and their children gather at a community nutrition centre in the little village of Rantolava, Madagascar, to learn more about a healthy diet. Credit: Alain Rakotondravony/IPSBy Gabriele RiccardiNAPLES, Italy, Nov 25 2020 (IPS) The risks factors contributing to the dramatic rise in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in recent decades have been known for a long time but the Covid-19 pandemic has brutally exposed our collective failure to deal with them. Reporting on the findings of the latest Global Burden of Disease Study, The Lancet warns of a “perfect storm” created by the interaction of the highly infectious C...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Gabriele Riccardi Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foun Source Type: news

Educational interventions on nutrition among older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials
Unhealthy food habits are associated with non-communicable diseases (NCD) [1 –3] and nutritional deficiencies [4]. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) [5], more than half of all deaths were due to ten main causes, with the leading killers being ischaemic heart disease and stroke. Diets characterized by a low intake of fruit and vegetable (FV) and fibre increas e the risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), obesity, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), gastrointestinal cancers, nutritional deficiencies, pancreatic diseases, depression and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia [4–7].
Source: Maturitas - March 18, 2020 Category: Primary Care Authors: Felix Jesus Neves, Luciana Yuki Tomita, Angela Sun Li Wu Liu, Solange Andreoni, Luiz Roberto Ramos Source Type: research

Omega-3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the most extensive systematic assessment of effects of omega-3 fats on cardiovascular health to date. Moderate- and low-certainty evidence suggests that increasing LCn3 slightly reduces risk of coronary heart disease mortality and events, and reduces serum triglycerides (evidence mainly from supplement trials). Increasing ALA slightly reduces risk of cardiovascular events and arrhythmia. PMID: 32114706 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - February 28, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: Abdelhamid AS, Brown TJ, Brainard JS, Biswas P, Thorpe GC, Moore HJ, Deane KH, Summerbell CD, Worthington HV, Song F, Hooper L Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Metformin for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated complications in persons at increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.
CONCLUSIONS: Metformin compared with placebo or diet and exercise reduced or delayed the risk of T2DM in people at increased risk for the development of T2DM (moderate-quality evidence). However, metformin compared to intensive diet and exercise did not reduce or delay the risk of T2DM (moderate-quality evidence). Likewise, the combination of metformin and intensive diet and exercise compared to intensive diet and exercise only neither showed an advantage or disadvantage regarding the development of T2DM (very low-quality evidence). Data on patient-important outcomes such as mortality, macrovascular and microvascular diabe...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - December 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Madsen KS, Chi Y, Metzendorf MI, Richter B, Hemmingsen B Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

How to Keep Alzheimer ’s From Bringing About the Zombie Apocalypse
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jay Newton-Small Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news

Let Plants be Thy Medicine – You Are What You Eat
Credit: Busani Bafana/IPSBy Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi NsoforILLINOIS, United States / ABUJA, Oct 16 2019 (IPS) United Nations World Food Day is celebrated around the world on October 16 under the theme: “Our Actions ARE Our Future. Healthy Diets for a Zero Hunger World”. This theme is timely, especially, because across Africa and around the world, there has been a gradual rise in malnutrition and diet-related non communicable diseases, as highlighted in The Lancet study and a United Nations Report published earlier this year. While 45 percent of deaths in children are from nutrition-related causes, mainly malnu...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health World Food Day Source Type: news

‘Salty’ Concern: Tackling High Salt Consumption in China
Veena S. Kulkarni, Associate Professor, Department of Criminology, Sociology and Geography, Arkansas State University, USA; and Raghav Gaiha, (Hon.) Professorial Research Fellow, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, England.By Veena S. Kulkarni and Raghav GaihaNEW DELHI, India and JONESBORO, US, Oct 7 2019 (IPS) China’s almost meteoric transition from a being a low income to a middle income country within a span of four decades is often perceived as a miracle analogous to the post Second World War Japanese economic development experience. China’s GDP rose from $200 current United States dollars (US$ ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Veena Kulkarni and Raghav Gaiha Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Food & Agriculture Food Sustainability Globalisation Headlines Health Labour TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (BCFN) Source Type: news

IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 3582: Overview of Meta-Analyses: The Impact of Dietary Lifestyle on Stroke Risk
The objective of our work is to present an overview of meta-analyses that have investigated the impact of different foods and/or drinks in relationship with the risk of stroke events (ischemic/hemorrhagic). The papers to be included in the overview were found in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Clinicaltrials.gov, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library and were selected according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) flow chart. Quality assessment were made according to the AMSTAR 2 scale. This overview shows that all primary studies came from countries with high income levels. This evide...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - September 24, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Emma Altobelli Paolo Matteo Angeletti Leonardo Rapacchietta Reimondo Petrocelli Tags: Review Source Type: research

NAMPT as a Dedifferentiation-Inducer Gene: NAD+ as Core Axis for Glioma Cancer Stem-Like Cells Maintenance
Conclusion and Perspectives Gliomas are the most prevalent primary brain cancer in adults and include a broad category of tumors including astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and GBM. Regardless of tumor aggressiveness, malignancy, and infiltration, these glia-derived tumors rarely exceed a median survival time of 12–14 months. Driven by the infiltrative nature of these tumors, the clinical approach is difficult and relapses often occur with fatal consequences. These unsuccessful attempts to control glioma's fate have fostered research looking for more effective therapies. (GSCs) are a small subset of CD133&#...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - May 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

Preventable Cases of Oral Anticoagulant-Induced Bleeding: Data From the Spontaneous Reporting System
Conclusion: Our findings describe the most reported risk factors for preventability of oral anticoagulant-induced bleedings. These factors may be useful for targeting interventions to improve pharmacovigilance activities in our regional territory and to reduce the burden of medication errors and inappropriate prescription. Introduction Oral anticoagulant therapy is widely used for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation, or for the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (Raj et al., 1994; Monaco et al., 2017). Oral anticoagulants can be di...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - April 29, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

A Copernican Approach to Brain Advancement: The Paradigm of Allostatic Orchestration
The objective of this presentation is to explore historical, scientific, interventional, and other differences between the two paradigms, so that innovators, researchers, practitioners, policy-makers, patients, end-users, and others can gain clarity with respect to both the explicit and implicit assumptions associated with brain advancement agendas of any kind. Over the course of three decades, a series of brain-centric, evolution-inspired insights have been articulated with increasing refinement, as principles of allostasis (Sterling and Eyer, 1988; Sterling, 2004, 2012, 2014). Allostasis recognizes that the role of the ...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - April 25, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Harnessing the Four Elements for Mental Health
DiscussionAs detailed above, the “elements” in both a classical and a contemporary sense have effects on our mental health and are potentially modifiable aspects that can be harnessed as therapeutic interventions. The most robust interventional evidence currently available shows tentative support for several use of the elements via horticultural and nature-exposure therapy, green exercise/physical activity, sauna and heat therapy, balneotherapy, and breathing exercises. It should be noted that, in many cases, these interventions were not studied in definitive diagnosed psychiatric disorders and thus it is pre...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - April 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Study: Skipping Breakfast Tied To Higher Risk Of Heart-Related Death
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news

An Evaluation of Personal Cooling Systems for Reducing Thermal Strain Whilst Working in Chemical/Biological Protective Clothing
Conclusion: The IV, PCM, and SLIV produced lower heart rate, mean skin, rectal and mean body temperatures in addition to improved work times compared to control. The WS did not improve work times possibly as a result of the cooling capacity of the suit abating, and magnifying thermal insulation. Considering the added time and resources required to implement combination cooling in the form of ice slurry and ice vest (SLIV), there was no significant additive effect for perception, cardiovascular strain, rectal temperature and total trial time relative to the phase change vest or ice vest alone. This may be a product of a &#x...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - April 11, 2019 Category: Physiology Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Programming During and After Diabetic Pregnancy: Role of Placental Dysfunction and IUGR
This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - April 8, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

Diet Drinks Linked To Increased Stroke Risk & Heart Attacks
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet beverages and vascular disease, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage or another hidden health issue. “Postmenopausal women tend to have higher risk for vascular disease because they are lacking the protective effects of natural hormones,” North Carolina cardiologist Dr. Kevin Campbell said, which could contribute to increased risk for heart disease and stroke...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Heart Attack Stroke Source Type: news

Diet Beverages Linked To Increased Stroke Risk & Heart Attacks
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet beverages and vascular disease, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage or another hidden health issue. “Postmenopausal women tend to have higher risk for vascular disease because they are lacking the protective effects of natural hormones,” North Carolina cardiologist Dr. Kevin Campbell said, which could contribute to increased risk for heart disease and stroke...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Heart Attack Stroke Source Type: news

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

High-Fiber Diet Linked To Lower Risk Of Death And Chronic Illness
(CNN) — People who eat diets that are high in fiber have lower risk of death and chronic diseases such as stroke or cancer compared with people with low fiber intake, a new analysis found. Dietary fiber includes plant-based carbohydrates such as whole-grain cereal, seeds and some legumes. Fiber’s health benefits have been recorded “by over 100 years of research,” Andrew Reynolds, a researcher at the University of Otago in New Zealand, wrote in an email. He is co-author of the new meta-analysis of existing research, which was published Thursday in the journal The Lancet. The research shows that high...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN fiber Local TV Source Type: news

Study details how high fiber diets make for healthier lives
People who eat lots of high-fiber and whole grain foods have lower risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and other chronic diseases than people whose diets are low in fiber, a study commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) says.
Source: Reuters: Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Want to Prevent the Deadliest Diseases? Eat More Fiber
If you want to eat something for better health, make it fiber. That’s the advice from nutrition experts and the latest national dietary guidelines. Now, a large new review of studies on fiber, published in the Lancet, shows just how beneficial fiber can be. The nutrient substantially lowers the risk of at least four diseases—many of which don’t even directly relate to the gut. Compared to those who ate less fiber, people who ate more fiber lowered their risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and colon cancer, as well as their risk of dying early from any cause, by 15% to 30%. And the more dietary ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Diet/Nutrition healthytime Heart Disease Source Type: news

Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated complications in people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus.
CONCLUSIONS: AGI may prevent or delay the development of T2DM in people with IGT. There is no firm evidence that AGI have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular mortality or cardiovascular events. PMID: 30592787 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - December 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Moelands SV, Lucassen PL, Akkermans RP, De Grauw WJ, Van de Laar FA Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Omega-3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the most extensive systematic assessment of effects of omega-3 fats on cardiovascular health to date. Moderate- and high-quality evidence suggests that increasing EPA and DHA has little or no effect on mortality or cardiovascular health (evidence mainly from supplement trials). Previous suggestions of benefits from EPA and DHA supplements appear to spring from trials with higher risk of bias. Low-quality evidence suggests ALA may slightly reduce CVD event and arrhythmia risk. PMID: 30521670 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - November 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Abdelhamid AS, Brown TJ, Brainard JS, Biswas P, Thorpe GC, Moore HJ, Deane KH, AlAbdulghafoor FK, Summerbell CD, Worthington HV, Song F, Hooper L Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Omega-6 fats for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the most extensive systematic assessment of effects of omega-6 fats on cardiovascular health, mortality, lipids and adiposity to date, using previously unpublished data. We found no evidence that increasing omega-6 fats reduces cardiovascular outcomes other than MI, where 53 people may need to increase omega-6 fat intake to prevent 1 person from experiencing MI. Although benefits of omega-6 fats remain to be proven, increasing omega-6 fats may be of benefit in people at high risk of MI. Increased omega-6 fats reduce serum total cholesterol but not other blood fat fractions or adiposity. PMID: 3048...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - November 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Hooper L, Al-Khudairy L, Abdelhamid AS, Rees K, Brainard JS, Brown TJ, Ajabnoor SM, O'Brien AT, Winstanley LE, Donaldson DH, Song F, Deane KH Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Polyunsaturated fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the most extensive systematic review of RCTs conducted to date to assess effects of increasing PUFA on cardiovascular disease, mortality, lipids or adiposity. Increasing PUFA intake probably slightly reduces risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease events, may slightly reduce risk of coronary heart disease mortality and stroke (though not ruling out harms), but has little or no effect on all-cause or cardiovascular disease mortality. The mechanism may be via TG reduction. PMID: 30484282 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - November 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Abdelhamid AS, Martin N, Bridges C, Brainard JS, Wang X, Brown TJ, Hanson S, Jimoh OF, Ajabnoor SM, Deane KH, Song F, Hooper L Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Tannins and Vascular Complications of Diabetes: An update
ConclusionThis review focuses on the role of various tannins in prevention and management of diabetic complications like diabetic nephropathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. It will researchers to find some leads for the development of new cost effective therapy using dietary source for the management of diabetic complications.Graphical abstract
Source: Phytomedicine - October 23, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

The Promise of Digital Health in the Fight against Noncommunicable Diseases
September 06, 2018Could activity trackers help stem the global tide of hypertension?Noncommunicable diseases, or NCDs,  kill 41 million people around the world each year, including 15 million whodie prematurely because of them. But did you know that 85% of these premature deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries?Also known as chronic diseases, NCDs include pulmonary/respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. They are often preventable and develop gradually. There are several risk factors for NCDs, including hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, obesity, and unhealthy lifestyle and diet.But the bi...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Salt not as damaging to health as previously thought, says study
New research reignites a row with scientists who want to reduce salt intake to near zeroSalt may not be as damaging to health as is usually claimed, according to a controversial new study which suggests campaigns to persuade people to cut down may only be worthwhile in countries with very high sodium consumption, such as China.The World Health Organization recommends cutting sodium intake to no more than 2g a day – the equivalent of 5g of salt – because of the link to increased blood pressure, which is in turn implicated in stroke.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Science Health Diets and dieting Medical research Nutrition Food & wellbeing Heart attack Source Type: news

Exploring solutions for healthy, safe, and sustainable fatty acids (EPA and DHA) consumption in The Netherlands
AbstractAdvisory bodies such as the World Health Organization and the Dutch Health Council (DHC) recommend including fatty fish in one ’s diet, based on the health benefits of their content ofn − 3 poly unsaturated fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid—EPA and docosahexaenoic acid—DHA) being, i.e., the reduction of the risk of fatal cardio vascular disease and stroke. These dietary advices on these fatty acids’ (e.g., fatty fish) consumption are only based on the expected health benefits. But what would a dietary advice look like when the health benefits were weighed up against relevant sustainability and food s...
Source: Sustainability Science - July 20, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: research

Polyunsaturated fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the most extensive systematic review of RCTs conducted to date to assess effects of increasing PUFA on cardiovascular disease, mortality, lipids or adiposity. Increasing PUFA intake probably slightly reduces risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease events, may slightly reduce risk of coronary heart disease mortality and stroke (though not ruling out harms), but has little or no effect on all-cause or cardiovascular disease mortality. The mechanism may be via lipid reduction, but increasing PUFA probably slightly increases weight. PMID: 30019767 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - July 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Abdelhamid AS, Martin N, Bridges C, Brainard JS, Wang X, Brown TJ, Hanson S, Jimoh OF, Ajabnoor SM, Deane KH, Song F, Hooper L Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Omega-3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the most extensive systematic assessment of effects of omega-3 fats on cardiovascular health to date. Moderate- and high-quality evidence suggests that increasing EPA and DHA has little or no effect on mortality or cardiovascular health (evidence mainly from supplement trials). Previous suggestions of benefits from EPA and DHA supplements appear to spring from trials with higher risk of bias. Low-quality evidence suggests ALA may slightly reduce CVD event risk, CHD mortality and arrhythmia. PMID: 30019766 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - July 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Abdelhamid AS, Brown TJ, Brainard JS, Biswas P, Thorpe GC, Moore HJ, Deane KH, AlAbdulghafoor FK, Summerbell CD, Worthington HV, Song F, Hooper L Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Omega-6 fats for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: This is the most extensive systematic assessment of effects of omega-6 fats on cardiovascular health, mortality, lipids and adiposity to date, using previously unpublished data. We found no evidence that increasing omega-6 fats reduces cardiovascular outcomes other than MI, where 53 people may need to increase omega-6 fat intake to prevent 1 person from experiencing MI. Although benefits of omega-6 fats remain to be proven, increasing omega-6 fats may be of benefit in people at high risk of MI. Increased omega-6 fats reduce serum total cholesterol but not other blood fat fractions or adiposity. PMID: 3001...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - July 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Hooper L, Al-Khudairy L, Abdelhamid AS, Rees K, Brainard JS, Brown TJ, Ajabnoor SM, O'Brien AT, Winstanley LE, Donaldson DH, Song F, Deane KH Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

An Egg A Day Might Reduce Your Risk Of Heart Disease, Study Says
In this study however, they didn’t assess the risk of developing diabetes, which may be because diabetes is a newer disease in the Chinese population and there is not good documentation of who has it,” Richard said. Still, she noted, “this will be very important data for helping develop dietary prevention guidelines in China.” Cardiovascular disease, which takes the lives of 17.7 million people every year, is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Cardiovascular disease causes nearly a third — 31% — of all global deaths each year....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Eggs Heart Disease Local TV Source Type: news

A nonrestrictive, weight loss diet focused on fiber and lean protein increase
According to the World Health Organization, more than 1.9 billion adults age ≥18 year were overweight and more than 600 million adults obese worldwide in 2014 [1]. Excess weight significantly increases the risk for morbidity including hypertension, stroke, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, and some types of cancers [2,3]. In the United States, obesit y remains a leading public health problem with 34.9% of adults and 16.9% of children who were obese between 2011 and 2012 [4].
Source: Nutrition - March 22, 2018 Category: Nutrition Authors: Lijuan Zhang, Sherry Pagoto, Barbara Olendzki, Gioia Persuitte, Linda Churchill, Jessica Oleski, Yunsheng Ma Tags: Applied nutritional investigation Source Type: research

Urine Arsenic and Arsenic Metabolites in U.S. Adults and Biomarkers of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Endothelial Dysfunction: A Cross-Sectional Study
Conclusion: In a cross-sectional study of U.S. adults, we observed some positive associations of uAs and toenail As concentrations with biomarkers potentially relevant to CVD pathogenesis and inflammation, and evidence of a higher capacity to metabolize inorganic As was negatively associated with a marker of oxidative stress. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2062 Received: 14 April 2017 Revised: 13 November 2017 Accepted: 15 November 2017 Published: 15 December 2017 Address correspondence to S.F. Farzan, 2001 N. Soto St., Los Angeles, CA, 90032. Telephone: (323)-442-5101; Email: sffarzan@usc.edu Supplemental Material is ava...
Source: EHP Research - December 16, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research

Long-Term Exposure to Transportation Noise in Relation to Development of Obesity —a Cohort Study
Conclusion: Our results link transportation noise exposure to development of obesity and suggest that combined exposure from different sources may be particularly harmful. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910 Received: 17 March 2017 Revised: 5 October 2017 Accepted: 9 October 2017 Published: 20 November 2017 Address correspondence to A. Pyko, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Telephone: 46(0) 852487561. Email: Andrei.pyko@ki.se Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910). The authors declare they have no actual or potential competing fina...
Source: EHP Research - November 20, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research

Long-term Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Nonaccidental and Cause-specific Mortality in a Large National Cohort of Chinese Men
Conclusions: Long-term exposure to PM2.5 was associated with nonaccidental, CVD, lung cancer, and COPD mortality in China. The IER estimator may underestimate the excess relative risk of cause-specific mortality due to long-term exposure to PM2.5 over the exposure range experienced in China and other low- and middle-income countries. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1673 Received: 24 February 2017 Revised: 01 September 2017 Accepted: 05 September 2017 Published: 07 November 2017 Address correspondence to M. Zhou, National Center for Chronic Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control ...
Source: EHP Research - November 7, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research

Plasma Metal Concentrations and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Chinese Adults: The Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort
Conclusions: Our study suggested that incident CHD was positively associated with plasma levels of titanium and arsenic, and inversely associated with selenium. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings in other populations. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1521 Received: 22 December 2016 Revised: 17 September 2017 Accepted: 19 September 2017 Published: 19 October 2017 Address correspondence to T. Wu, or A. Pan, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hongkong Rd., Wuhan 430030, Hubei, China. Telephone: +86-27-83692347. Email: wut@mails.tjmu.edu.cn or p...
Source: EHP Research - October 20, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research

Association of Long-Term Exposure to Transportation Noise and Traffic-Related Air Pollution with the Incidence of Diabetes: A Prospective Cohort Study
Conclusion: We found a positive association between residential transportation noise and diabetes, adding to the growing body of evidence that noise pollution exposure may be independently linked to metabolic health and should be considered when developing public health interventions. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1279 Received: 26 October 2016 Revised: 07 May 2017 Accepted: 09 May 2017 Published: 31 August 2017 Address correspondence to C. Clark, Ove Arup and Partners, Acoustics, 13 Fitzroy Street, London, W1T 4BQ, UK. Telephone: +44 207755 4702. Email: Charlotte.Clark@arup.com The authors declare they have no actual o...
Source: EHP Research - August 31, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research

Life-saving fruit and vegetable diet need only be three portions – study
New research reveals daily dose of just 375g of fruit, vegetables and beans are sufficient to reduce risk of stroke, heart disease or premature death, and could help low-income consumersWolfing down a mountain of fruit and vegetables every day offers no more benefit in staving off death than eating just three to four portions, researchers have found, adding that the findings could have important ramifications for those on low incomes.The World Health Organisation currently recommends individuals eat at least 400g of fruit, vegetables and legumes – plants such as peas and beans – each day, although recent studies have s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Health Fruit Vegetables Food & drink Life and style Science Society Source Type: news

Whole grain cereals for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence from RCTs of an effect of whole grain diets on cardiovascular outcomes or on major CVD risk factors such as blood lipids and blood pressure. Trials were at unclear or high risk of bias with small sample sizes and relatively short-term interventions, and the overall quality of the evidence was low. There is a need for well-designed, adequately powered RCTs with longer durations assessing cardiovascular events as well as cardiovascular risk factors. PMID: 28836672 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - August 24, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Kelly SA, Hartley L, Loveman E, Colquitt JL, Jones HM, Al-Khudairy L, Clar C, Germanò R, Lunn HR, Frost G, Rees K Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research

Endocrine Disruptors and Health Effects in Africa: A Call for Action
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - August 23, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Associations between Greenness, Impervious Surface Area, and Nighttime Lights on Biomarkers of Vascular Aging in Chennai, India
Conclusion: Greenness, ISA, and NTL were associated with increased SBP, DBP, and cPP, and with reduced FMD, suggesting a possible additional EVA pathway for the relationship between urbanization and increased CVD prevalence in urban India. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP541 Received: 20 May 2016 Revised: 03 January 2017 Accepted: 23 January 2017 Published: 02 August 2017 Address correspondence to K.J. Lane, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511 USA. Telephone: (781) 696-4537; Email: kevin.lane@yale.edu Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289...
Source: EHP Research - August 2, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research

The Association of Arsenic Metabolism with Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiological Evidence
Conclusions: Population level of iAs% and DMA%, but not MMA%, were associated with arsenic exposure levels. Overall, study findings suggest that higher MMA% was associated with an increased risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, while lower MMA% was associated with an increased risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Additional population-based studies and experimental studies are needed to further evaluate and understand the role of arsenic exposure in arsenic metabolism and the role of arsenic metabolism in disease development. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP577 Received: 01 June 2016 Revised: 26 February 2017 Acce...
Source: EHP Research - August 2, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Research Source Type: research