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Total 22 results found since Jan 2013.

New Peptides as Potential Players in the Crosstalk Between the Brain and Obesity, Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases
According to the World Health Organization report published in 2016, 650 million people worldwide suffer from obesity, almost three times more than in 1975. Obesity is defined as excessive fat accumulation which may impair health with non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, coronary artery disease, stroke), and some cancers. Despite medical advances, cardiovascular complications are still the leading causes of death arising from obesity. Excessive fat accumulation is caused by the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. The pathogenesis of this process is complex and not ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - August 23, 2021 Category: Physiology Source Type: research

Roche launches new ways to use their cardiovascular tests empowering clinicians to improve diagnosis and treatment of millions of people
Basel, 28 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) announced a series of five new intended uses for two key cardiac biomarkers using the Elecsys ® technology: high sensitive cardiac troponin T (cTnT-hs) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide test (NT-proBNP). These gold standard biomarkers³ have proven to be successful in supporting cardiovascular disease management and can help clinicians diagnose heart attacks⁴ (cTnT-hs) and bett er manage heart failure⁵ (NT-proBNP). Roche ' s introduction of five new intended uses for these existing, globally accepted diagnostic solutions means more people could benef...
Source: Roche Media News - April 28, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How to Keep Alzheimer ’s From Bringing About the Zombie Apocalypse
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jay Newton-Small Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news

Updates in Brain Imaging
Neuroradiology has seen many advances in the past few years, placing the radiologist in a crucial role. Large trials have demonstrated the efficacy of thrombectomy for large vessel occlusions in stroke, emphasizing the importance of triaging patients for intervention. Genomics has become central to the classification of brain neoplasms, culminating in the 2016 World Health Organization classification of brain tumors. Advanced imaging techniques, such as functional MR imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion, and MR spectroscopy, have added value in tumor diagnosis, surgical planning, and surveillance.
Source: Radiologic Clinics of North America - August 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Jacqueline A. Bello, Shira E. Slasky Tags: Preface Source Type: research

NAMPT as a Dedifferentiation-Inducer Gene: NAD+ as Core Axis for Glioma Cancer Stem-Like Cells Maintenance
Conclusion and Perspectives Gliomas are the most prevalent primary brain cancer in adults and include a broad category of tumors including astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and GBM. Regardless of tumor aggressiveness, malignancy, and infiltration, these glia-derived tumors rarely exceed a median survival time of 12–14 months. Driven by the infiltrative nature of these tumors, the clinical approach is difficult and relapses often occur with fatal consequences. These unsuccessful attempts to control glioma's fate have fostered research looking for more effective therapies. (GSCs) are a small subset of CD133&#...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - May 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

A Post-hoc Study of D-Amino Acid Oxidase in Blood as an Indicator of Post-stroke Dementia
In conclusion, our data support that plasma DAO levels were increased in PSD patients and correlated with brain WMH, independent of age, gender, hypertension, and renal function. Plasma DAO levels may therefore aid in PSD diagnosis. Introduction Stroke is a risk factor for both vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease (1, 2). Functional recovery develops over the course of 26 weeks after a stroke (3), but the survivors are often left with disabilities. In addition to the sequelae of acute neuronal damage, the 1-year post-stroke dementia (PSD) rates after first-ever and recurrent stroke are ~10 and 30...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - April 25, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

The Outcome of Status Epilepticus and Long-Term Follow-Up
Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of regular care and patient follow-up. Introduction Status epilepticus (SE) is a condition and most extreme form of epilepsy (1), which leads to abnormal and prolonged seizure (at least 5 min). In case SE persists over 30 min, it may have severe long-term consequences (2). Referring to the new classification scheme of SE, there are two operational dimensions of the definition: time point 1 (T1) is associated with abnormally prolonged seizure, when therapy should be initiated, while time point 2 (T2) is related to the time of on-going seizure activity involving a risk...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - April 25, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

A Copernican Approach to Brain Advancement: The Paradigm of Allostatic Orchestration
The objective of this presentation is to explore historical, scientific, interventional, and other differences between the two paradigms, so that innovators, researchers, practitioners, policy-makers, patients, end-users, and others can gain clarity with respect to both the explicit and implicit assumptions associated with brain advancement agendas of any kind. Over the course of three decades, a series of brain-centric, evolution-inspired insights have been articulated with increasing refinement, as principles of allostasis (Sterling and Eyer, 1988; Sterling, 2004, 2012, 2014). Allostasis recognizes that the role of the ...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - April 25, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Harnessing the Four Elements for Mental Health
DiscussionAs detailed above, the “elements” in both a classical and a contemporary sense have effects on our mental health and are potentially modifiable aspects that can be harnessed as therapeutic interventions. The most robust interventional evidence currently available shows tentative support for several use of the elements via horticultural and nature-exposure therapy, green exercise/physical activity, sauna and heat therapy, balneotherapy, and breathing exercises. It should be noted that, in many cases, these interventions were not studied in definitive diagnosed psychiatric disorders and thus it is pre...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - April 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Anxiety in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: Risk Factors and Effects on Functional Status
Conclusion: Depressive symptoms are the major correlates of PSA while more severe PSA is associated with poorer ADL and health-related QOL. Acute lesions involving CHWM may correlate with PSA in ischemic stroke patients with mild-to-moderate neurologic deficits, supporting a lesion-location hypothesis in PSA.IntroductionAnxiety is prevalent after stroke and occurs in about one-quarter of stroke survivors (1, 2). Poststroke anxiety (PSA) may have a negative impact on quality of life (QOL) of stroke survivors, affecting their rehabilitation (3). Furthermore, one prospective study found that severe anxiety symptoms were assoc...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - April 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Pentraxin 3 in Cardiovascular Disease
Giuseppe Ristagno1*, Francesca Fumagalli1, Barbara Bottazzi2, Alberto Mantovani2,3,4, Davide Olivari1, Deborah Novelli1 and Roberto Latini1 1Department of Cardiovascular Research, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research IRCCS, Milan, Italy 2Humanitas Clinical and Research Center-IRCCS, Milan, Italy 3Humanitas University, Milan, Italy 4The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom The long pentraxin PTX3 is a member of the pentraxin family produced locally by stromal and myeloid cells in response to proinflammatory signals and microbial moieties. The p...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - April 16, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Platelet Count Predicts Adverse Clinical Outcomes After Ischemic Stroke or TIA: Subgroup Analysis of CNSR II
Conclusion: In ischemic stroke or TIA patients with platelet count within normal range, platelet count may be a qualified predictor for long-term recurrent stroke, mortality, and poor functional outcome. Introduction Platelets exert a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications of cardio-cerebrovascular disease, contributing to thrombus formation, and embolism (1, 2). Previous literature reported that platelets of various size and density are produced by megakaryocytes of different size and stages of maturation in different clinical conditions, suggesting various platelet patterns in differen...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - April 11, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Programming During and After Diabetic Pregnancy: Role of Placental Dysfunction and IUGR
This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - April 8, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Cancers, Vol. 11, Pages 111: A Review on a Deep Learning Perspective in Brain Cancer Classification
uca Saba Jasjit S. Suri A World Health Organization (WHO) Feb 2018 report has recently shown that mortality rate due to brain or central nervous system (CNS) cancer is the highest in the Asian continent. It is of critical importance that cancer be detected earlier so that many of these lives can be saved. Cancer grading is an important aspect for targeted therapy. As cancer diagnosis is highly invasive, time consuming and expensive, there is an immediate requirement to develop a non-invasive, cost-effective and efficient tools for brain cancer characterization and grade estimation. Brain scans using magnetic resonanc...
Source: Cancers - January 18, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Gopal S. Tandel Mainak Biswas Omprakash G. Kakde Ashish Tiwari Harman S. Suri Monica Turk John R. Laird Christopher K. Kwaku A. Annabel A. Ankrah N. N. Khanna B. K. Madhusudhan Luca Saba Jasjit S. Suri Tags: Review Source Type: research

An Egg A Day Might Reduce Your Risk Of Heart Disease, Study Says
In this study however, they didn’t assess the risk of developing diabetes, which may be because diabetes is a newer disease in the Chinese population and there is not good documentation of who has it,” Richard said. Still, she noted, “this will be very important data for helping develop dietary prevention guidelines in China.” Cardiovascular disease, which takes the lives of 17.7 million people every year, is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Cardiovascular disease causes nearly a third — 31% — of all global deaths each year....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Eggs Heart Disease Local TV Source Type: news

Endocrine Disruptors and Health Effects in Africa: A Call for Action
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - August 23, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Toxic Air – The ‘Invisible Killer’ that Stifles 300 Million Children
On 24 October 2016 in Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria, children pass in front of a flame fed by waste and rubber materials in order to make Kanda, a type of smoked meat, at an abattoir. Photo: UNICEF/Tanya BindraBy Baher KamalROME, Nov 1 2016 (IPS)About 300 million children in the world are living in areas with outdoor air so toxic – six or more times higher than international pollution guidelines – that it can cause serious health damage, including harming their brain development. This shocking finding has just been revealed by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), in a new report — ‘Clear the...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Climate Change Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

Environmental Pollution: An Under-recognized Threat to Children’s Health, Especially in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Conclusions Patterns of disease are changing rapidly in LMICs. Pollution-related chronic diseases are becoming more common. This shift presents a particular problem for children, who are proportionately more heavily exposed than are adults to environmental pollutants and for whom these exposures are especially dangerous. Better quantification of environmental exposures and stepped-up efforts to understand how to prevent exposures that cause disease are needed in LMICs and around the globe. To confront the global problem of disease caused by pollution, improved programs of public health monitoring and environmental protecti...
Source: EHP Research - March 1, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Web Admin Tags: Brief Communication March 2016 Source Type: research

2016 Moon Shot for Cancer: Focus on Prevention
It is now 2016, and Americans hope for a brighter, healthier new year. Are Americans healthier today than they were last year or the year before? Will there be fewer people diagnosed with cancer? According to the American Cancer Society, it is projected that in 2016 there will be 1,685,210 new cancer cases and 595,690 deaths due to cancer. This is an increase over previous years. While it is true that the death rate for several cancers has decreased (due mostly to better screening and earlier diagnosis), it is also true that several cancers are on the rise, including cancers of the thyroid, liver, pancreas, kidney, small i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news