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The Effect of Whey Protein on the Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Overweight and Obese Individuals; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
ConclusionAccording to the results, whey supplementation significantly reduced the SBP, DBP, HDL, waist circumference, TG and FBS in intervention groups in comparing to control groups.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - November 15, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

Impact of the 2015 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Outbreak on Emergency Care Utilization and Mortality in South Korea.
CONCLUSION: During the MERS epidemic, the number of ER visits decreased in all age, sex, and socioeconomic groups, and decreased most sharply for low-acuity diseases. Nonetheless, there was no significant change in deaths after emergency care. PMID: 31347336 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Yonsei Medical Journal - July 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Lee SY, Khang YH, Lim HK Tags: Yonsei Med J Source Type: research

What Causes Facial Nerve Palsy?
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 3, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

SwitchPoint 2019: Day 1
By Margarite Nathe, Principal Editor/Writer, IntraHealth InternationalApril 25, 2019It takes tenacity to work in global health and development. These folks have it.I ’m going to go out on a limb and guess that if you work in global health or international development, you might know what frustration feels like.Maybe the project funding cycle gets you down. Maybe you ’ve struggled with a public policy that hurts more people than it helps. It could be that you’ve grappled with shoddy data sets, or corrupt officials, or the fickle winds of politics that so often blow our efforts off course.You need tenacity to do th...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: SwitchPoint Source Type: news

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Are Eggs Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Eggs dominate the menus of all sorts of breakfast spots, from fast-food chains to organic cafes. But the humble egg comes with a lot of questions: Will eggs raise your cholesterol? Should you order an egg-white omelet or embrace the yolks? And what about organic eggs — are they really more nutritious? Whether you eat them every day or just occasionally, there’s plenty to learn about how to incorporate eggs into a healthy diet. Here, dietitians weigh in on what you need to know about nutrition in eggs. Are eggs healthy? Nutrition experts agree that the protein and vitamins in eggs make them a healthy option. &ld...
Source: TIME: Health - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Are Eggs Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
Eggs dominate the menus of all sorts of breakfast spots, from fast-food chains to organic cafes. But the humble egg comes with a lot of questions: Will eggs raise your cholesterol? Should you order an egg-white omelet or embrace the yolks? And what about organic eggs — are they really more nutritious? Whether you eat them every day or just occasionally, there’s plenty to learn about how to incorporate eggs into a healthy diet. Here, dietitians weigh in on what you need to know about nutrition in eggs. Are eggs healthy? Nutrition experts agree that the protein and vitamins in eggs make them a healthy option. &ld...
Source: TIME: Health - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Methylenecyclopropyl glycine, not pesticide exposure as the primary etiological factor underlying Hypoglycemic Encephalopathy in Muzaffarpur, India.
Abstract Some districts of Bihar, especially Muzzaffarpur district, have been known to be affected by annual outbreak, called locally as Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) which became one of the major health concerns in Bihar, due to its high fatality and complications. Several hypotheses like bat virus, heat stroke, pesticide exposure and the presence of a compound - methylenecyclopropyl glycine (MCPG) in Litchi have been proposed by different investigators for AES. When the investigators examined the symptoms, signs and the epidemiological data, bat virus and heat stroke hypothesis were ruled out. Two major hypo...
Source: Toxicology Letters - October 30, 2018 Category: Toxicology Authors: Asthana S, Dixit S, Srivastava A, Kumar A, Singh SP, Tripathi A, Das M Tags: Toxicol Lett Source Type: research

Cardiovascular disease in Greece; the latest evidence on risk factors.
Authors: Michas G, Karvelas G, Trikas A Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a significant and ever-growing problem in Europe, accounting for nearly 45% of all deaths and leading to significant morbidity. Greece is one of the European Union member states that top the list of deaths due to ischemic heart disease and stroke, a fact that is mainly attributed to unfavorable changes in modifiable risk factors. The aim of this review is to examine the latest evidence on the most important CVD risk factors. According to studies conducted during the last two decades, the prevalence of arterial hypertension, hypercholes...
Source: Hellenic Journal of Cardiology - October 16, 2018 Category: Cardiology Tags: Hellenic J Cardiol Source Type: research

Heartfelt sepsis: microvascular injury due to genomic storm.
Abstract Sepsis is one of the ten leading causes of death in developed and developing countries. In the United States, sepsis mortality approaches that of acute myocardial infarction and exceeds deaths from stroke. Neonates and the elderly are the most vulnerable patients, with these groups suffering from the highest sepsis mortality. In both groups, many survivors respectively display serious developmental disabilities and cognitive decline. The National Institute of Health National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Panel redefined sepsis as a "severe endothelial dysfunction syndrome in response to intravascular and...
Source: Polish Heart Journal - July 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Hawiger J Tags: Kardiol Pol Source Type: research

Comment The social sciences, humanities, and health
Humanities and social sciences have had many positive influences on health experiences, care, and expenditure. These include on self-management for diabetes, provision of psychological therapy, handwashing, hospital checklists, the Scottish Government's stroke guidelines, England's tobacco control strategy, the response to the Ebola outbreak in west Africa and Zika virus in Brazil, and many more.1 Researchers have shown time and time again the political, practical, economic, and civic value of education and research in disciplines like anthropology, history, and philosophy.
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Martyn Pickersgill, Sarah Chan, Gill Haddow, Graeme Laurie, Devi Sridhar, Steve Sturdy, Sarah Cunningham-Burley Tags: Comment Source Type: research

10 Global Health Issues to Watch in 2018
January 19, 2018It ’s notallbad news.When we set out to compile our annual list of global health issues to watch this year, it seemed like all bad news. And true, that ’s often what we deal with in global health—the problems that need tackling, the suffering we can help alleviate.But then stories and columns likethis one cheer us up. They remind us that no matter how complicated and frustrating our work may get, fighting back against poverty and inequality works.There are and always will be global health challenges to face. But there ’s boundless hope, too. And a field full of determined health workers and other hu...
Source: IntraHealth International - January 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Cold snap has immediate effect on emergency admissions
Rates of MI and stroke, and respiratory admissions, rise significantly for almost two weeks Related items fromOnMedica GPs in Northern Ireland ask patients to self-treat over winter Trusts set to use multiple measures to ease winter pressure NHS winter plans centre on more flu jabs and A&E staff Parents urged to vaccinate children against flu Struggling NHS will be floored by flu outbreak or cold snap, warn NHS leaders
Source: OnMedica Latest News - December 12, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Former CDC chief Frieden to head $225m anti-heart disease initiative
Previous US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Tom Frieden said he will head Resolve, a new public health initiative focused on fighting heart disease and stroke which has already raised $225 million in backing from a handful of private philanthropies. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative have joined in to fund the initiative. Resolve plans to invest in efforts to reduce trans-fats from restaurant menus, which follows up on Frieden’s 2006 efforts to ban trans-fats as the New York City health commissioner. The initiative will also look to...
Source: Mass Device - September 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Source Type: news

Former U.S. CDC director takes aim at outbreaks, heart disease
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Former U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Tom Frieden on Tuesday announced the start of a new public health initiative funded by private philanthropies to fight heart disease and stroke and shore up infectious disease capabilities around the world.
Source: Reuters: Health - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Cold weather warning: THESE three serious conditions are more likely in winter
WINTER weather often comes with an outbreak of common colds and flu, but the season can also increase risk of stroke, asthma attacks and seasonal affective disorder.
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Endocrine Disruptors and Health Effects in Africa: A Call for Action
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - August 23, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniil Lyalko Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Promoting evidence-based health care in Africa
Charles Shey Wiysonge, Director ofCochane  South Africa, gave an interview to the World Health Organization Bulletin. Here is a re-post , with premission, from their  recent publication.Charles Shey Wiysonge is devoted to encouraging better use of scientific evidence for health policies and programmes in African countries. He is the director of the South African Cochrane Centre, a unit of the South African Medical Research Council, and a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the department of Global Health in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. He was Chief Res...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for July 25, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. How a single drop of blood can detect sepsis Sepsis can be identified by a single drop of blood, thanks to a lab-on-a-chip device from the University of Illinois. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the Carle Foundati...
Source: Mass Device - July 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

For Humanitarian Workers, Mental Health Needs Are Often Overlooked
July 19, 2017It ' s time to take mental well-being during complex emergencies seriously.In my family there was always a strong culture of suffering in silence. We were encouraged as children to ignore small injuries and illnesses, and to soldier on without complaint.I only realized the full extent of this embedded behavior when my elderly mother dislocated her shoulder and refused to go to the hospital for 24 hours, somehow believing that it would get better on its own.It has always been difficult to shake off this deeply ingrained sense that to ask for help is somehow weak. When, in a one year period, my son had a serious...
Source: IntraHealth International - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Dangerous Fruit: Mystery of Deadly Outbreaks in India Is Solved
Researchers had suspected that heat stroke, infections or pesticides were behind a disease that killed about 40 percent of children affected, but it seems lychees were to blame.
Source: NYT Health - January 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ELLEN BARRY Tags: Litchis Muzaffarpur, India Epidemics The Lancet Srikantiah, Padmini Source Type: news

Bagged salads 'pose salmonella risk,' say researchers
Conclusion This laboratory study principally demonstrates that salad leaf juice – released from salad leaves when they are damaged or broken – supports the growth of salmonella bacteria, even at fridge temperature. If leaves are contaminated with salmonella, this isn't removed by washing in water. The results don't show that all packaged salad leaves are contaminated with gut bacteria like salmonella. What they do show is that if the bags have been contaminated with gut bacteria, these bacteria will replicate, even in the fridge, and there's little you can do to remove them. The best thing to do is to throw the bag o...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Public health for paediatricians: population screening
Introduction The concept of population screening—proactive identification of a condition, disease or predisease state in individuals who presume themselves to be healthy but may benefit from early treatment—is a simple one. The translation of this into a screening programme often raises ethical, conceptual and practical challenges. For clinicians used to dealing with patients symptomatically, there are several key differences to understand between treating patients symptomatically compared with the approach to supporting the delivery of a screening programme. There is a range of definitions of screening, which ...
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Education and Practice - November 18, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Streetly, A., Madden, V. Tags: Drugs: CNS (not psychiatric), Stroke, Hypertension, Pregnancy, Reproductive medicine, Child health, Neonatal health, Screening (epidemiology), Health promotion, Screening (public health) Source Type: research

Life and death in the United States, in two maps
The latest news about preventable deaths in the United States has some encouraging data and one sobering statistic. On the good-news front, fewer people are dying prematurely from three of the five leading causes of death between 2010 and 2014: cancer, stroke and heart disease. But there was a significant increase in preventable deaths from […]Related:The Ebola outbreak may have been bigger than believed, with ‘invisible’ infectionThe ultimate Q&A about health care under a Trump presidencyTeamsters demand McKesson CEO return millions of dollars for role in opioid crisis
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preparations for the upcoming pilgrimage: heat exhaustion and respiratory diseases are a priority
Over 2 million Muslim pilgrims are expected to participate in this year’s hajj that begins next week in Saudi Arabia’s holy city of Mecca. In preparation, the Saudi Ministry of Health with support from World Health Organization (WHO) has put in place measures to prevent and rapidly address any health issues that could arise during the hajj, including the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and other respiratory diseases. In addition, WHO has contributed to the training of more than 25 health cadres from the cities of Jeddah, Mecca and Madinah on rapid response to health emergencies. The training f...
Source: WHO EMRO News - September 6, 2016 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

Preparations for the upcoming pilgrimage: heat exhaustion and respiratory diseases are the priority
Over 2 million Muslim pilgrims are expected to participate in this year’s hajj that begins next week in Saudi Arabia’s holy city of Mecca. In preparation, the Saudi Ministry of Health with support from World Health Organization (WHO) has put in place measures to prevent and rapidly address any health issues that could arise during the hajj, including the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and other respiratory diseases. In addition, WHO has contributed to the training of more than 25 health cadres from the cities of Jeddah, Mecca and Madinah on rapid response to health emergencies. The training f...
Source: WHO EMRO News - September 6, 2016 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

MRI finds something fishy in outbreak of brain infections
When more than 200 people in Singapore were afflicted simultaneously with group...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Diffusion-weighted imaging breaks new ground in abdomen DWI-MRI shows which stroke patients need fast therapy DWI adds little to PET/MRI for female pelvic malignancies
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 2, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Needs of Internally Displaced Women and Children in Baghdad, Karbala, and Kirkuk, Iraq
Conclusions The vulnerability of this population is great, and the emotional trauma of multiple displacements, kidnapping and deaths from intentional violence is great. While some aid is reaching families, much more is needed. Though Iraq is a middle income country, reaching the IDPs in central Iraq will take much more in international assistance than is currently being received. Unfortunately, at this time of great need, assistance is being cut back throughout the region because of lack of funding.10 The local civil society organizations which have sprung up in many locations to assist IDPs, offer an avenue for targeting ...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - June 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Gilbert Burnham Source Type: research

Be Aware and Beware: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Is an Equal Opportunity Disease
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, or CFS, is an innocuous name given to a debilitating disease. Its seriousness is better indicated by the term Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), a label preferred by many of its victims. On May 17-18, the Department of Health and Human Services hosted the biannual public meeting of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee by webinar. This was a fitting time for such a meeting, as May is International ME/CFS Awareness Month. The trigger for CFS/ME is not known. The lack of research on the disease means there is no truly effective and widely available therapy that would allow the more serious...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prevalence and severity of hypertensive emergencies and outbreaks in the hospital emergency department of CHU Timone at Marseille: Follow-up in three months of hospitalized patients.
CONCLUSION: Hypertensive emergencies hospitalized in Timone Hospital represent 44% of patients hospitalized for emergency HTA. Their gravity is 1/3 since most patients die within three months warranting closer management of these fragile patients by creating a specialized consulting postemergency. PMID: 27184512 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angeiologie - May 13, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Guiga H, Sarlon-Bartoli G, Silhol F, Radix W, Michelet P, Vaïsse B Tags: Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris) Source Type: research

Diseases Neglected by the Media in Espírito Santo, Brazil in 2011–2012
Conclusions Media visibility acts as a strategy for legitimising priorities and contextualizing various realities. Therefore, we propose that the health problems identified should enter the public agenda and begin to be recognized as legitimate demands.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - April 26, 2016 Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Aline Guio Cavaca Source Type: research

Don’t shrug off shingles
If you had chickenpox as a kid, there is a good chance you may develop shingles later in life. “In fact, one in three is predicted to get shingles during their lifetime,” says Dr. Anne Louise Oaklander, director of the Nerve Unit at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. The same varicella-zoster virus that causes chickenpox also causes shingles. After the telltale spots of chickenpox vanish, the virus lies dormant in your nerve cells near the spinal cord and brain. When your immunity weakens from normal aging or from illnesses or medications, the virus can re-emerge. It then travels along a nerve to trigge...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Solan Tags: Healthy Aging Infectious diseases Vaccines Source Type: news

Lupus, Selena Gomez's Autoimmune Disease, Explained
In an interview with Billboard magazine this week, Selena Gomez confirmed she's been struggling with an autoimmune disease that forced her to take a step back from her work and cancel tours in 2013 and 2014. "I was diagnosed with lupus, and I’ve been through chemotherapy," she told Billboard. "That’s what my break was really about. I could’ve had a stroke." What is lupus? Similar to other autoimmune diseases, lupus causes the body's immune system to attack its own tissue and organs.  Lupus can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms -- including joint pain, chronic fati...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lifestyle Choices Fuel Epidemics of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease among Asian Indians
Within the next 15 years, India is projected to overtake China as the world’s most populous nation. Due to the rapid pace of urbanization and modernization fueling population growth, in conjunction with a genetic predisposition to insulin resistance, India is suffering a rising epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including coronary artery disease (CAD), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and stroke. In addition to the genetic predisposition, major negative lifestyle factors are contributing to the alarming outbreak of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among the Asian Indian population; these factors include:1) a diet ...
Source: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases - August 12, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Evan L. O’Keefe, James J. DiNicolantonio, Harshal Patil, John H. Helzberg, Carl J. Lavie Source Type: research

Estimated deaths and illnesses averted during fungal meningitis outbreak associated with contaminated steroid injections, United States, 2012-2013.
Abstract During 2012-2013, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and partners responded to a multistate outbreak of fungal infections linked to methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) injections produced by a compounding pharmacy. We evaluated the effects of public health actions on the scope of this outbreak. A comparison of 60-day case-fatality rates and clinical characteristics of patients given a diagnosis on or before October 4, the date the outbreak was widely publicized, with those of patients given a diagnosis after October 4 showed that an estimated 3,150 MPA injections, 153 cases of meningitis or st...
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - May 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Smith RM, Derado G, Wise M, Harris JR, Chiller T, Meltzer MI, Park BJ Tags: Emerg Infect Dis Source Type: research

Madison Small And The Threat Of Bacterial Meningitis
Eighteen-year old high school student Madison Small of Ashburn, Virginia is dead after a swift and unexpected bacterial infection, reported ABC News. Small, an accomplished softball player, complained of a headache on the evening of Monday, Apr. 6 and was taken to the hospital, according to local news station WJLA in the video above. She died the next morning. On April 13, health investigators announced that she had died of bacterial meningitis, but said that her case was not part of a wider outbreak in the community. Bacterial meningitis is rare but severe. The infection, which can be caused by several different strai...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

CDC's Mission: Protecting the Health of Americans
There is no doubt Ebola will rank as the biggest public health story of 2014, both here in the United States and around the world: more people sickened by Ebola than ever before in history, more people dying, and more understanding of how the health of one nation affects the health of us all. Today, more than 170 of CDC's top health professionals are in West Africa working to stop the current Ebola epidemic and leave behind stronger public health systems. Many hundreds more support their work at home. Leaving behind better capacities to find, stop, and prevent health threats in affected countries will help prevent the ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 24, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boston Children’s Hospital Testing Epileptic Seizure-Detecting Watch
BOSTON (CBS) – Epilepsy is a tough condition to live with and, despite treatment, many patients often still have seizures. But now there’s a new way to warn their families when there is trouble. Leonor Colon’s 12-year-old son, Gali, has suffered from seizures all his life after having a stroke at birth. Even on multiple medications, he still has a seizure a week, usually at night. “My biggest fear is that if I’m not here to help him, that when I wake him up, he will be dead from seizures,” she told WBZ-TV. It’s a scary but real possibility. Dr. Tobi Loddenkemper, an epilepsy specialist at Bost...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 16, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: miketoole Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen Boston Children's Hospital CBS Boston Dr. Mallika Marshall Dr. Tobias Loddenkemper Embrace Epilepsy Leonor Colon Seizure Watch Source Type: news

Here Are the Real Victims of Pakistan’s War on the Taliban
An elderly displaced man carries a sack of rations on his shoulder. The Pakistan Army has distributed 30,000 ration packs of 110 kg each. Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Ashfaq YusufzaiPESHAWAR, Pakistan, Jul 1 2014 (IPS) Three days ago, Rameela Bibi was the mother of a month-old baby boy. He died in her arms on Jun. 28, of a chest infection that he contracted when the family fled their home in Pakistan’s North Waziristan Agency, where a full-scale military offensive against the Taliban has forced nearly half a million people to flee. Weeping uncontrollable, Bibi struggles to recount her story. “My son was born on Jul. 2...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 1, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Ashfaq Yusufzai Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Population Povert Source Type: news

Resolution of a fungal mycotic aneurysm after a contaminated steroid injection: a case report
Conclusions: This is the rare case report of successful medical management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm with stroke symptoms related to a presumed phaeohyphomycosis in an immunocompetent individual. Further studies are needed to determine the utility of cerebrospinal fluid (1, 3) beta-D-glucan in diagnosing and monitoring patients with meningitis thought to be related to fungal infection.
Source: BMC Research Notes - May 31, 2014 Category: Research Authors: George NelsonOlga FermoKiran ThakurElizabeth FeltonJee BangLucy WilsonSusan RheeRafael LlinasKristine JohnsonDavid Sullivan Source Type: research

Infection in long term care facility in the kingdom of Bahrain
Summary: Infections in long term care facilities (LTCF) are common and are considered a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Endemic infections and outbreaks are observed in LTCF. Of particular concern is the growth of multi-drug resistant organisms. A study was conducted in the Kingdom of Bahrain concerning infections among the residents in a LTCF. The aim was to define the rate, type and outcomes of institutional infections. The different treatment modalities and antimicrobials used were evaluated. Our facility cares for the elderly and a heterogeneous group of patients from different populations (e.g., mentally retar...
Source: Journal of Infection and Public Health - April 28, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Jameela Al Salman, Rawan A. Al Agha, Yazen A. Mussayab, Abbas F. Hassan Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Emergency department visits in Colorado associated with smoking synthetic cannabinoids
3 out of 5 stars Severe Illness Associated with Reported Use of Synthetic Marijuana — Colorado, August-September 2013. MMWR 2013 Dec 13;62:1016-1017. Full Text In August and September of this year, it became apparent to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) that there was a significant increase in the number of patients visiting emergency departments after smoking synthetic marijuana products. Therefore, the Department sent out a request to all EDs in the state to report patients seen on or after August 21 with altered mental status after using any form of synthetic marijuana. To study this pr...
Source: The Poison Review - December 13, 2013 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Medical colorado crazy clown denver spice synthetic cannabinoid Source Type: news