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Total 14 results found since Jan 2013.

Health Worker Training Is Improving Hypertension Care and Prevention in Senegal
October 31, 2019During interviews with almost 2,000 health workers and clients in Dakar, Senegal, IntraHealth International found that some 40% of health workers had not been trained to care for clients with hypertension, and 83% of clients who did not have hypertension knew no more than a single warning sign. But a 2019 evaluation reveals significant progress in under two years.The results from our 2017-2018 situational analysis uncovered gaps in hypertension care and prevention in Dakar, including insufficiencies in equipment, hypertension management skills, and patient education.Those results helped guide theBetter Hear...
Source: IntraHealth International - October 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Senegal Neema Noncommunicable Diseases Human Resources Management Primary Health Care Source Type: news

Cells to Society: "Gold Standard" Chicago Parent Program / Research News
This study was conducted to enhance the rate of advance care planning conversations and documentation by improving knowledge, attitudes, and skills of caregivers.      Read more   Violence and Trauma ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - October 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

10 New Year ’s Resolutions Doctors Actually Want You to Make
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news

10 New Year's Resolutions Doctors Actually Want You to Make
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news

Breastfeeding may help protect against stroke
Post-menopausal women have lower risk of stroke if they breastfed Related items fromOnMedica Antiseptic prevents deaths in newborns UK lagging behind peers on child health Breastfeeding for longer could save NHS £40 million a year Babies aged 2-3 months to a year vulnerable to measles Fewer than ever women smoke at point of birth
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 22, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Promoting evidence-based health care in Africa
Charles Shey Wiysonge, Director ofCochane  South Africa, gave an interview to the World Health Organization Bulletin. Here is a re-post , with premission, from their  recent publication.Charles Shey Wiysonge is devoted to encouraging better use of scientific evidence for health policies and programmes in African countries. He is the director of the South African Cochrane Centre, a unit of the South African Medical Research Council, and a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the department of Global Health in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. He was Chief Res...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 17, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines 2016 Quiz of the Year
In 2014, Behind the Headlines has covered more than 500 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. If you've been paying attention you should find this quiz easy and fun. Why not test your knowledge of 2014's health news with our month-by-month quiz? Answers are at the foot of the page (no peeking!).   In January 2016's health news... In a controversial study, monkeys were genetically engineered to develop what disorder? 1) Sex addiction 2) Bi-polar disorder 3) Autism In a similarly controversial study, what psychological condition was dismissed as a "myth" 1) Seasonal affective disorder...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports Source Type: news

How family tragedy turned Roald Dahl into a medical pioneer
After his wife ’s stroke and his daughter’s death from measles, Roald Dahl applied his genius to medicine – making extraordinary breakthroughs. His doctor and friend recalls what he learned while treating the author in the last year of his lifeIn 1990, I was a junior doctor at the John Radcliffe hospital in Oxford. I had finished all my training, and was now starting my first year on the wards.Roald Dahl was one of my patients. I can still remember the night I first met him.It was nearly midnight and the lights were low. I was working away on the ward computer when I became aware of this large figure wandering slowly...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 12, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Tom Solomon Tags: Roald Dahl Books Culture Fiction Medical research Health Source Type: news

Needs of Internally Displaced Women and Children in Baghdad, Karbala, and Kirkuk, Iraq
Conclusions The vulnerability of this population is great, and the emotional trauma of multiple displacements, kidnapping and deaths from intentional violence is great. While some aid is reaching families, much more is needed. Though Iraq is a middle income country, reaching the IDPs in central Iraq will take much more in international assistance than is currently being received. Unfortunately, at this time of great need, assistance is being cut back throughout the region because of lack of funding.10 The local civil society organizations which have sprung up in many locations to assist IDPs, offer an avenue for targeting ...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - June 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Gilbert Burnham Source Type: research

ANH-Intl News Alerts: Week 42, 2014
TTIP, vaccines, water fluoridation, healthy eating, stroke risk, and history of safe use for food
Source: Alliance for Natural Health - October 15, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Sophie Tags: BMI calories cerebral infarction diet europe healthy eating india innoculation international Ireland Israel McDonalds measles NAMV Novel Foods Regulation Nurses Against Mandatory Vaccines obesity restaurant stroke risk Source Type: news

Here Are the Real Victims of Pakistan’s War on the Taliban
An elderly displaced man carries a sack of rations on his shoulder. The Pakistan Army has distributed 30,000 ration packs of 110 kg each. Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Ashfaq YusufzaiPESHAWAR, Pakistan, Jul 1 2014 (IPS) Three days ago, Rameela Bibi was the mother of a month-old baby boy. He died in her arms on Jun. 28, of a chest infection that he contracted when the family fled their home in Pakistan’s North Waziristan Agency, where a full-scale military offensive against the Taliban has forced nearly half a million people to flee. Weeping uncontrollable, Bibi struggles to recount her story. “My son was born on Jul. 2...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 1, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Ashfaq Yusufzai Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Population Povert Source Type: news

What Causes Ataxia?
Discussion Coordination and balance problems are caused by various problems affecting the central and peripheral nervous system. Normal development of a child or weakness of a child are commonly mistaken for true ataxia. Ataxia specifically refers to “…impairment of the coordination of movement without loss of muscle strength.” If it is purely due to abnormalities of the cerebellum then there should be no changes in mental status, sensation or weakness. Sometimes it is difficult to determine if there are abnormalities in other areas. For example, Guillian-Barre often presents with difficulty or clumsy wal...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - March 31, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Brigham And Women’s Study To Test ‘Chocolate’ Pills For Heart Health
BOSTON (CBS) – It sounds like research that people would line up to take part in – a study to see whether the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes. However, the 18,000 men and women who will be signed up for the study will not be eating candy. The cocoa flavanols found in dark chocolate will be taken in pill form. The study will be done through Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The flavanol capsules are coated and have no taste, lead researcher Dr. JoAnn Manson told the Associated Press. MORE HEALTH NEWS FROM CBS...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: miketoole Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Brigham and Women's Hospital CBS Boston Cocoa Flavanols Dark Chocolate Heart Attack Stroke Study WBZ Source Type: news