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Infectious Disease: MERS

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Total 11 results found since Jan 2013.

The potential role of microvascular pathology in the neurological manifestations of coronavirus infection
We present the hypothesis that pre-existing vascular damage (due to aging, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension or other conditions) facilitates infiltration of the virus into the central nervous system (CNS), increasing neuro-inflammation and the likelihood o f neurological symptoms. We also discuss the role of a neuroinflammatory cytokine profile in both blood–brain barrier dysfunction and macrovascular disease (e.g. ischemic stroke and thromboembolism). Future studies are needed to better understand the involvement of the microvasculature in coronavi rus neuropathology, and to test the diagnostic potential o...
Source: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS - September 10, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

Post-traumatic stress disorder: a differential diagnostic consideration for COVID-19 survivors.
CONCLUSIONS: Heightened risk of PTSD occurred in MERS and SARS survivors. While data concerning COVID-19 is lacking, PTSD is known to occur in patient groups who undergo similar hospital courses, including ICU survivors, patients who are intubated and mechanically ventilated, and those that experience delirium. Research with patients who develop PTSD in the context of mild traumatic brain injury further suggests that PTSD may account for some or all of a patient's subjective cognitive complaints and neuropsychological test performance. Recommendations are provided for assessing PTSD in the context of COVID-19. PMID: 3...
Source: The Clinical Neuropsychologist - August 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kaseda ET, Levine AJ Tags: Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research

Mild Encephalitis/Encephalopathy with a Reversible Splenial Lesion in an Adult with Cerebellar Ataxia: A Case Report.
Abstract Mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) is a clinicoradiological syndrome characterized by transient mild encephalopathy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a reversible lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC). Patients with MERS generally present with central nervous system symptoms such as consciousness disturbance, headache, and seizure; adult-onset MERS with cerebellar ataxia is rare. A 53-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with fever of 1 week's duration, headache, neck stiffness, and gait disturbance. Neurological examination revealed...
Source: Journal of Nippon Medical School - July 15, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Nakajima M, Suda S, Kimura K Tags: J Nippon Med Sch Source Type: research

Less Myocardial Infarction and Stroke Hospitalizations During Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Epidemic in Korea
Viral infections are known to impact coronary disease, and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may be triggered by the inflammatory cytokine response to infection.1,2 Cytokines promote local inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques within the coronary artery, which can lead to plaque destabilization, rupture, and eventually AMI development. Psychological adversity, depression, stress at home or work, social isolation and loneliness are also known factors contributing to acute vascular event.3 Recent outbreaks of coronavirus (CoV), including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) ...
Source: The American Journal of Cardiology - July 3, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Cai De Jin, Moo Hyun Kim, Kwang Min Lee, Jong Sung Park, Dong Sik Jung, Sung-Cheol Yun, Victor Serebruany Source Type: research

Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Stroke: Clinical Manifestations and Pathophysiological Insights
An outbreak of an acute respiratory illness of unknown cause started in Wuhan, Hubei province, China on December 12, 2019.1,2 A new strain of coronavirus, named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was identified in these patients. Subsequently, the identified acute respiratory illness was named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Soon thereafter, the COVID-19 epidemic in China became a pandemic with a significant burden on healthcare and the world-wide economy. SARS-CoV-2 has been shown to be a distinct class of the beta coronaviruses (Beta-CoVs) with a 79.5% gene sequence homology to the severe ...
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - May 11, 2020 Category: Neurology Authors: Afshin A. Divani, Sasan Andalib, Mario Di Napoli, Simona Lattanzi, M. Shazam Hussain, Jos é Biller, Louise D. McCullough, M. Reza Azarpazhooh, Alina Seletska, Stephan A. Mayer, Michel Torbey Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Neurological complications of coronavirus and COVID-19.
CONCLUSIONS: Future epidemiological studies and case records should elucidate the real incidence of these neurological complications, their pathogenic mechanisms and their therapeutic options. PMID: 32329044 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Revista de Neurologia - April 26, 2020 Category: Neurology Authors: Carod-Artal FJ Tags: Rev Neurol Source Type: research

Impact of the 2015 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Outbreak on Emergency Care Utilization and Mortality in South Korea.
CONCLUSION: During the MERS epidemic, the number of ER visits decreased in all age, sex, and socioeconomic groups, and decreased most sharply for low-acuity diseases. Nonetheless, there was no significant change in deaths after emergency care. PMID: 31347336 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Yonsei Medical Journal - July 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Lee SY, Khang YH, Lim HK Tags: Yonsei Med J Source Type: research

Cochrane ' s 30 under 30: Ndi Euphrasia Ebai-Atuh
Cochrane is made up of  13,000 members and over 50,000 supporters come from more than 130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.  Many  of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane as researchers, citizen scientists...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 12, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Preparations for the upcoming pilgrimage: heat exhaustion and respiratory diseases are a priority
Over 2 million Muslim pilgrims are expected to participate in this year’s hajj that begins next week in Saudi Arabia’s holy city of Mecca. In preparation, the Saudi Ministry of Health with support from World Health Organization (WHO) has put in place measures to prevent and rapidly address any health issues that could arise during the hajj, including the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and other respiratory diseases. In addition, WHO has contributed to the training of more than 25 health cadres from the cities of Jeddah, Mecca and Madinah on rapid response to health emergencies. The training f...
Source: WHO EMRO News - September 6, 2016 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

Preparations for the upcoming pilgrimage: heat exhaustion and respiratory diseases are the priority
Over 2 million Muslim pilgrims are expected to participate in this year’s hajj that begins next week in Saudi Arabia’s holy city of Mecca. In preparation, the Saudi Ministry of Health with support from World Health Organization (WHO) has put in place measures to prevent and rapidly address any health issues that could arise during the hajj, including the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and other respiratory diseases. In addition, WHO has contributed to the training of more than 25 health cadres from the cities of Jeddah, Mecca and Madinah on rapid response to health emergencies. The training f...
Source: WHO EMRO News - September 6, 2016 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news