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Total 25 results found since Jan 2013.

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Ebola Leaves Lingering Neurological Effects
(MedPage Today) -- Survivors diagnosed with migraines, stroke, depression and anxiety
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - July 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Ebola survivors suffer severe mental and neurological problems
People who survive the deadly Ebola virus can continue to suffer severe psychiatric and neurological problems including depression, debilitating migraines, nerve pain and stroke, according to a study published on Wednesday.
Source: Reuters: Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Smoking and Parenting; Afib and Stroke: It ' s PodMed Double T! (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week ' s topics include the Ebola vaccine, stroke risk and resolved a-fib, an antibody for migraine prevention, and cannabis and tobacco smoking by parents
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - May 19, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Comment The social sciences, humanities, and health
Humanities and social sciences have had many positive influences on health experiences, care, and expenditure. These include on self-management for diabetes, provision of psychological therapy, handwashing, hospital checklists, the Scottish Government's stroke guidelines, England's tobacco control strategy, the response to the Ebola outbreak in west Africa and Zika virus in Brazil, and many more.1 Researchers have shown time and time again the political, practical, economic, and civic value of education and research in disciplines like anthropology, history, and philosophy.
Source: LANCET - April 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Martyn Pickersgill, Sarah Chan, Gill Haddow, Graeme Laurie, Devi Sridhar, Steve Sturdy, Sarah Cunningham-Burley Tags: Comment Source Type: research

CDC Director Resigns Amid Reports of Tobacco Stock Trade
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced on January 31, 2018, that Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald would resign as the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The statement read, “Dr. Fitzgerald owns certain complex financial interests that have imposed a broad recusal limiting her ability to complete all of her duties as the CDC Director. Due to the nature of these financial interests, Dr. Fitzgerald could not divest from them in a definitive time period.” The decision came a day after Politico reported that she bought stock in a large tobacco company within a month of start...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Former CDC chief Frieden to head $225m anti-heart disease initiative
Previous US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Dr. Tom Frieden said he will head Resolve, a new public health initiative focused on fighting heart disease and stroke which has already raised $225 million in backing from a handful of private philanthropies. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative have joined in to fund the initiative. Resolve plans to invest in efforts to reduce trans-fats from restaurant menus, which follows up on Frieden’s 2006 efforts to ban trans-fats as the New York City health commissioner. The initiative will also look to...
Source: Mass Device - September 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Source Type: news

For Humanitarian Workers, Mental Health Needs Are Often Overlooked
July 19, 2017It ' s time to take mental well-being during complex emergencies seriously.In my family there was always a strong culture of suffering in silence. We were encouraged as children to ignore small injuries and illnesses, and to soldier on without complaint.I only realized the full extent of this embedded behavior when my elderly mother dislocated her shoulder and refused to go to the hospital for 24 hours, somehow believing that it would get better on its own.It has always been difficult to shake off this deeply ingrained sense that to ask for help is somehow weak. When, in a one year period, my son had a serious...
Source: IntraHealth International - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

This Popular Kind Of Heartburn Medicine Can Increase Stroke Risk
This study further questions the cardiovascular safety of these drugs,” Sehested said. Although the study found an association between PPIs and stroke risk, it does not prove cause and effect. More studies are needed, and doctors should consider if and for how long patients should take these drugs, the researchers said. [7 Bizarre Drug Side Effects] PPIs are not the only medicines available to treat heartburn. The researchers noted that another type of heartburn medication, called a histamine H2 antagonist, was found to have no association with stroke risk in the study. Histamine H2 antagonists include famotidine (Pe...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Life and death in the United States, in two maps
The latest news about preventable deaths in the United States has some encouraging data and one sobering statistic. On the good-news front, fewer people are dying prematurely from three of the five leading causes of death between 2010 and 2014: cancer, stroke and heart disease. But there was a significant increase in preventable deaths from […]Related:The Ebola outbreak may have been bigger than believed, with ‘invisible’ infectionThe ultimate Q&A about health care under a Trump presidencyTeamsters demand McKesson CEO return millions of dollars for role in opioid crisis
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980 –2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
Publication date: 8–14 October 2016 Source:The Lancet, Volume 388, Issue 10053 Author(s): GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death CollaboratorsHaidongWangMohsenNaghaviChristineAllenRyan MBarberZulfiqar ABhuttaAustinCarterDaniel CCaseyFiona JCharlsonAlan ZianChenMatthew MCoatesMeganCoggeshallLalitDandonaDaniel JDickerHolly EErskineAlize JFerrariChristinaFitzmauriceKyleForemanMohammad HForouzanfarMaya SFraserNancyFullmanPeter WGethingEllen MGoldbergNicholasGraetzJuanita AHaagsmaSimon IHayChantalHuynhCatherine OJohnsonNicholas JKassebaumYohannesKinfuXie RachelKulikoffMichaelKutzHmwe HKyuHeidi JLarsonJanniLeungXiaofengLiangS...
Source: The Lancet - October 7, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research

Patty Duke's Death Announcement Is A Milestone For Sepsis Awareness
Oscar-winning actress Patty Duke, star of "The Patty Duke Show" and the Broadway play and film “The Miracle Worker,” died of sepsis from a ruptured intestine on Tuesday. Simple though it may seem, her death announcement is a major milestone for the sepsis awareness movement, said Thomas Heymann, executive director of the Sepsis Alliance. The more people are aware of this condition, Heymann said, the stronger their likelihood of saving their own lives or the lives of their loved ones. "The fact that they said Patty Duke’s cause of death was sepsis is relatively new," Heymann said. "It very often ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

PodMed: A Medical News Roundup From Johns Hopkins (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include testosterone in older men, carotid procedures in those without symptoms, pioglitazone after a stroke, and managing Ebola in the U.S. and Europe
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - February 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

How Terrified Should We Be?
After every terrorist attack we go through a period of overwhelming fear that we will individually be the target of terrorism. Recently a man told me that he will avoid going to crowded areas of the city because he fears being killed by a terrorist. A woman fears flying because she fears the plane will be blown up by a terrorist. Years ago, after 9/11, a woman told me that she feared "Arab-looking men" in the subway. And, after 9/11, years ago, a family moved to Colorado from New York City because of their fear of terrorism. Fear pervaded the lives of many people and, once again, after the attack in San Bernardino, Califor...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?
Authors: Chang TM Abstract Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form o...
Source: Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology - December 12, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Tags: Artif Cells Nanomed Biotechnol Source Type: research

Activated protein C: biased for translation
The homeostatic blood protease, activated protein C (APC), can function as (1) an antithrombotic on the basis of inactivation of clotting factors Va and VIIIa; (2) a cytoprotective on the basis of endothelial barrier stabilization and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic actions; and (3) a regenerative on the basis of stimulation of neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Pharmacologic therapies using recombinant human and murine APCs indicate that APC provides effective acute or chronic therapies for a strikingly diverse range of preclinical injury models. APC reduces the damage caused by the following: ischemia/rep...
Source: Blood - May 7, 2015 Category: Hematology Authors: Griffin, J. H., Zlokovic, B. V., Mosnier, L. O. Tags: Vascular Biology, Review Articles Source Type: research

Ebola Epidemic Takes a Toll on Sierra Leone's Surgeons
This article originally appeared here on ScientificAmerican.com. Thaim Kamara is 60 years old and would like to retire this year. But he is one of only eight remaining surgeons in Sierra Leone, a west African country of about 6 million people. Kamara lost two friends to Ebola in 2014 -- Martin Salia and Thomas Rogers, fellow surgeons at Connaught Hospital in the capital, Freetown. In light of the dire circumstances, Kamara has postponed his plan to retire. Although the rate of new Ebola infections in Sierra Leone, along with neighboring countries Guinea and Liberia, is finally falling, more than 800 health care personnel...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could pharmacological curtailment of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway reverse the endothelial barrier dysfunction associated with Ebola virus infection?
Publication date: February 2015 Source:Antiviral Research, Volume 114 Author(s): Shahram Eisa-Beygi , Xiao-Yan Wen Activation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway induces endothelial barrier dysfunction and increased vascular permeability, which is a hallmark of various life-threatening vascular pathologies. Therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting the RhoA/ROCK pathway have proven effective in the attenuation of vascular leakage observed in animal models of endotoxin-induced lung injury/sepsis, edema, autoimmune disorders, and stroke. These findings suggest that treatments targeting the ROCK pathway might be of benef...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - January 2, 2015 Category: Virology Source Type: research

CDC's Mission: Protecting the Health of Americans
There is no doubt Ebola will rank as the biggest public health story of 2014, both here in the United States and around the world: more people sickened by Ebola than ever before in history, more people dying, and more understanding of how the health of one nation affects the health of us all. Today, more than 170 of CDC's top health professionals are in West Africa working to stop the current Ebola epidemic and leave behind stronger public health systems. Many hundreds more support their work at home. Leaving behind better capacities to find, stop, and prevent health threats in affected countries will help prevent the ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 24, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could pharmacological curtailment of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway reverse the endothelial barrier dysfunction associated with Ebola virus infection?
Abstract Activation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway induces endothelial barrier dysfunction and increased vascular permeability, which is a hallmark of various life-threatening vascular pathologies. Therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting the RhoA/ROCK pathway have proven effective in the attenuation of vascular leakage observed in animal models of endotoxin-induced lung injury/sepsis, edema, autoimmune disorders, and stroke. These findings suggest that treatments targeting the ROCK pathway might be of benefit in the management of the Ebola virus disease (EVD), which is characterized by severe vascular le...
Source: Antiviral Research - December 13, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Eisa-Beygi S, Wen X Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research

PodMed: A Medical News Roundup From Johns Hopkins (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include best medication for initial diabetes therapy, Ebola update, lowering blood pressure after stroke, and an LDL variant and aortic valve disease.
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - November 1, 2014 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Young, Healthy People Warned Not To Ignore Signs Of Atrial Fibrillation
BOSTON (CBS) – Heart problems are big problems for Americans, but if you think they only affect the elderly, think again. Younger and otherwise healthy people are having heart problems, too, even if they’re in great shape. Mark Marshall is only 51. The competitive wrestler was out for a training run when suddenly he felt a flutter in his chest and his vision blurred. “In my mind I’m thinking, you must be dehydrated. I had no idea I was in afib,” he remembers. But he was, even though Mark had none of the risk factors for atrial fibrillation like high blood pressure, high cholesterol and old ag...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 1, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen AFib Atrial Fibrillation Mallika Marshall Mark Marshall Source Type: news

The Week Ahead: Stroke in Kids, Prayer in Practice
(MedPage Today) -- Another installment in the ?I, Intern ?? series, a look at a formal spiritual protocol, teen pregnancy, and the latest on Ebola -- all coming this week from MedPage Today.
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - August 18, 2014 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Hamsters, Higgs and historians - blogs roundup
Posts on our network included a look at the race to put humans on Mars, whether closing stroke units can improve survival rates, and some scaremongering facts about Ebola Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 8, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Pete Etchells Tags: Science Source Type: news