Query: stroke

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Total 197 results found since Jan 2013.

Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode leading to recurrent superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oh Young Kwon, Seong Gwan Lim, Sung Hyuk Park Source Type: research

Stroke: prospective evaluation of a prehospital management process based on rescuers under medical direction
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 3, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Laure Alhanati, Stéphane Dubourdieu, Clément Hoffmann, Francis Béguec, Stéphane Travers, Hugues Lefort, Olga Maurin, Daniel Jost, Laurent Domanski, Jean-Pierre Tourtier Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Varicella zoster encephalitis mimicking stroke
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 16, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joaquín Valle Alonso, Javier Fonseca, Daniel López, Juan José Ochoa Source Type: research

An unusual cause of stroke in a young female
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 2, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Malik Asif Humayun, Adnan Masood, Tariq Waseem, Farina Ahmad, Tanzeem Raza Source Type: research

Implementation of a clinical pathway based on a computerized physician order entry system for ischemic stroke attenuates off-hour and weekend effects in the emergency department
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 11, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jong Min Yang, Yoo Seok Park, Sung Phil Chung, Hyun Soo Chung, Hye Sun Lee, Je Sung You, Shin Ho Lee, Incheol Park Source Type: research

Posterior Cerebral artery stroke presenting as Alexia without Agraphia
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 26, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bhawna Sharma, Rahul Handa, Swayam Prakash, Kadam Nagpal, Indu Bhana, Pankaj Kumar Gupta, Sunil Kumar, Mahendra Singh Sisodiya Source Type: research

Acute pediatric stroke—what’s the hurry? A case for emergency physician-performed echocardiography
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 16, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher D. Thom, Scott E. Sparks Source Type: research

Good outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute stroke in a patient under treatment with dabigatran
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 16, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Cátia Diogo, Josiana Duarte, Sofia Sobral, Paula Pestana, Hipólito Nzwalo, Henrique Rita, José Sousa Costa Source Type: research

Bun/creatinine ratio-based hydration for preventing stroke-in-evolution after acute ischemic stroke
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 4, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Leng-Chieh Lin, Jiann-Der Lee, Yen-Chu Hung, Chia-Hao Chang, Jen-Tsung Yang Source Type: research

Reperfusion strategy for simultaneous ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and acute ischemic stroke within a time window
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 5, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Héctor González-Pacheco, Aurelio Méndez-Domínguez, Gerardo Vieyra-Herrera, Francisco Azar-Manzur, Aloja Meave-González, Hugo Rodríguez-Zanella, Carlos Martínez-Sánchez Source Type: research

Transient splenial diffusion-weighted image restriction mimicking stroke
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 4, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sharma Bhawna, Handa Rahul, Nagpal Kadam, Prakash Swayam, Pankaj Kumar Gupta, Rakesh Agrawal, Mahendra S. Sisodiya Source Type: research

Hyperacute Guillain-Barré syndrome mimicking stroke: report of 3 cases
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: M. de Montaudouin, O. Fleury, M. Rouanet, P. Renou, F. Rouanet, Igor Sibon Source Type: research

Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode leading to recurrent superior mesenteric artery syndrome
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oh Young Kwon, Seong Gwan Lim, Sung Hyuk Park Source Type: research

Varicella zoster encephalitis mimicking stroke
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 16, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joaquín Valle Alonso, Javier Fonseca, Daniel López, Juan José Ochoa Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research

An unusual cause of stroke in a young female
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 2, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Malik Asif Humayun, Adnan Masood, Tariq Waseem, Farina Ahmad, Tanzeem Raza Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research

Successful management of heat stroke associated with multiple organ dysfunction by active intravascular cooling
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hideyuki Hamaya, Toru Hifumi, Kenya Kawakita, Tomoya Okazaki, Kazutaka Kiridume, Natsuyo Shinohara, Yuko Abe, Koshiro Takano, Masanobu Hagiike, Yasuhiro Kuroda Source Type: research

Association of physician risk tolerance with emergency department computed tomography use for isolated dizziness/vertigo patients
Dizziness/vertigo is one of the most common principal complaints in the emergency department (ED) [1], accounting for 2.5% of all ED presentations [2]. Although the most common causes of dizziness/vertigo are benign, potential life-threatening stroke especially cerebellar or brain stem infarction should be considered in the differential diagnosis, because isolated dizziness without other concurrent neurological symptoms can be the sole presentation of these conditions [3-5]. Non-contrast brain computed tomography (CT) provides the necessary information for emergency management of most patients with suspected stroke and is ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 30, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Fu-Jen Cheng, Chien-Hung Wu, Yuan-Jhen Syue, Pai-Chun Yen, Kuan-Han Wu Source Type: research

Approach to the diagnosis and treatment of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in a patient with sickle cell disease
We report a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage in a 38-year-old patient with sickle cell anemia. This case highlights the limitations of noncontrast computed tomography in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients with sickle cell disease as well as the special needs of this patient population in addressing the treatment of stroke.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 29, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew Lyon, Justin Jeter, Richard Lottenberg Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Dabigatran-related coagulopathy: when can we assume the effect has “worn off”?
This issue of American Journal of Emergency Medicine presents a timely report that should be noted by all practicing emergency physicians. Nzwalo et al [1] describe a 61-year-old man with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, taking 150 mg dabigatran twice daily for stroke protection, who presented to their emergency department (ED) with an acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The patient had a normal creatinine clearance and a normal thrombin time (TT). He was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) with good neurologic outcome and no bleeding complications.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 28, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Charles V. Pollack, Jerrold H. Levy, John Eikelboom, Jeffrey I. Weitz, Frank W. Sellke, Menno V. Huisman, Thorsten Steiner, Pieter Kamphuisen, Richard A. Bernstein Tags: Controversies Source Type: research

Intravenous methylphenidate: an unusual way to provoke ST-elevation myocardial infarction
Acute ST-T elevation is a sign of myocardial ischemia or infarction usually due to coronary artery atherosclerosis or coronary spasm. Coronary spasm may be spontaneous or can occur as a result of a drug that causes arterial spam. Ritalin, Novartis Pharmaceut. Corporation, USA (methylphenidate hydrochloride), a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, is an oral drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Sudden deaths, stroke, and myocardial infarction have been reported in adults taking stimulant drugs at usual dose for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder [1].
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Emile Hay, Vitaly Shklovski, Yossef Blaer, Vladimir Shlakhover, Amos Katz Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Association of physician risk tolerance with ED CT use for isolated dizziness/vertigo patients
Dizziness/vertigo is one of the most common principal complaints in the emergency department (ED) [1], accounting for 2.5% of all ED presentations [2]. Although the most common causes of dizziness/vertigo are benign, potential life-threatening stroke especially cerebellar or brain stem infarction should be considered in the differential diagnosis because isolated dizziness without other concurrent neurologic symptoms can be the sole presentation of these conditions [3-5]. Noncontrast brain computed tomography (CT) provides the necessary information for emergency management of most patients with suspected stroke and is the...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 30, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Fu-Jen Cheng, Chien-Hung Wu, Yuan-Jhen Syue, Pai-Chun Yen, Kuan-Han Wu Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Acute psychosis presenting as a sole manifestation of left atrial myxoma: a new paradigm
Atrial myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors. Neurological manifestations associated with left atrial myxoma are seen infrequently in the form of embolic stroke of intracranial hemorrhage. Psychiatric manifestations are however exceedingly rare. We hereby present a case who presented with acute psychosis as a sole manifestation of an underlying left atrial myxoma.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rajendra Singh Jain, Kadam Nagpal, Rahul Jain, Swayam Prakash, Rahul Handa Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Posterior cerebral artery stroke presenting as alexia without agraphia
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 28, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bhawna Sharma, Rahul Handa, Swayam Prakash, Kadam Nagpal, Indu Bhana, Pankaj Kumar Gupta, Sunil Kumar, Mahendra Singh Sisodiya Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Wax on, wax off: a rare case of catatonia
We present a unique case of late onset catatonia in a 56-year-old man with no prior medical or psychiatric history initially presenting with stroke-like symptoms.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 7, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Karen Greenberg, Michael D’Ambrosio, Kenneth M. Liebman, Erol Veznedaroglu Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Improved Door-to-Needle Times and Neurological Outcomes when IV-tPA is Administered by Emergency Physicians with Advanced Neuroscience Training
The neurologic emergency department (neuro ED) at our medical center is staffed by emergency medicine physicians who have specialized neuroscience training and give IV tPA independently for acute ischemic stroke patients. Door-to-needle times (DTN), discharge location, and discharge NIHSS scores were studied between the neurologic emergency department and main emergency department with the hypothesis that all measures would be better in the neuro ED group.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 28, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Karen Greenberg, Christina R. Maxwell, Keisha D. Moore, Michael D’Ambrosio, Kenneth Liebman, Erol Veznedaroglu, Geri Sanfillippo MSN, Cynthia Diaz, Mandy J. Binning Source Type: research

Improved door-to-needle times and neurologic outcomes when intravenous tissue plasminogen activator is administered by emergency physicians with advanced neuroscience training
The neurologic emergency department (neuro ED) at our medical center is staffed by emergency medicine physicians who have specialized neuroscience training and give intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) independently for acute ischemic stroke patients. Door-to-needle (DTN) times, discharge location, and discharge National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were studied between the neuro ED and main emergency department (ED) with the hypothesis that all measures would be better in the neuro ED group.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 28, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Karen Greenberg, Christina R. Maxwell, Keisha D. Moore, Michael D’Ambrosio, Kenneth Liebman, Erol Veznedaroglu, Geri Sanfillippo, Cynthia Diaz, Mandy J. Binning Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Neurogenic pulmonary edema following severe head injury: A transpulmonary thermodilution study
We report a fatal case of a 55-year old man who was admitted because of severe head injury. The diagnosis of NPE was considered according to clinical and radiological findings. Transpulmonary thermodilution (TPT) study showed decreased stroke volume index (SVI) and cardiac function index (CFI). Indexed extravascular lung water (EVLWI) was increased as well as pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI).
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 18, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anis Chaari, Kamilia Chtara, Nozha Toumi, Mabrouk Bahloul, Mounir Bouaziz Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research

Neurogenic pulmonary edema after severe head injury: a transpulmonary thermodilution study
We report a fatal case of a 55-year-old man who was admitted because of severe head injury. The diagnosis of NPE was considered according to clinical and radiologic findings. Transpulmonary thermodilution study showed decreased stroke volume index and cardiac function index. Indexed extravascular lung water was increased as well as pulmonary vascular permeability index.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 18, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anis Chaari, Kamilia Chtara, Nozha Toumi, Mabrouk Bahloul, Mounir Bouaziz Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Association of Plasma DAO and iFABP with Severity of Disease In Patient with Heat Stroke
The aim of this study was to describe the role of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (iFABP) and allergy-related diamine oxidase (DAO) in HS patients.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 2, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lin Zhang, Xiaoming Fan, Zhiyue Zhong, Guoxiong Xu, Jie Shen Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Intraparenchymal hemorrhage after heroin use
Heroin-associated stroke is a rare complication of use. Various proposed mechanisms of heroin-associated ischemic stroke have been proposed, including the following: cardioembolism in the setting of infective endocarditis, hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the setting of hypoxemia and hypotension, and infective arteritis or vasculitis from drug adulterants. A previously healthy 28-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and normal vitals after she was found wandering outside her apartment.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 16, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neha Kumar, Mary Colleen Bhalla, Jennifer A. Frey, Alison Southern Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Improved door-to-needle times and neurologic outcomes when IV tissue plasminogen activator is administered by emergency physicians with advanced neuroscience training
The neurologic emergency department (neuro ED) at our medical center is staffed by emergency medicine physicians who have specialized neuroscience training and give intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) independently for acute ischemic stroke patients. Door-to-needle (DTN) times, discharge location, and discharge National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were studied between the neuro ED and main emergency department (ED) with the hypothesis that all measures would be better in the neuro ED group.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 28, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Karen Greenberg, Christina R. Maxwell, Keisha D. Moore, Michael D’Ambrosio, Kenneth Liebman, Erol Veznedaroglu, Geri Sanfillippo, Cynthia Diaz, Mandy J. Binning Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Achieving Regionalization through Rural Inter-hospital Transfer
Regionalization of emergency medical care aims to provide consistent and efficient high quality care leading to optimal clinical outcomes by matching patient needs with appropriate resources at a network of hospitals. Regionalized care has been shown to improve outcomes in trauma, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac arrest, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In rural areas, effective regionalization often requires inter-hospital transfer. The decision to transfer is complex and includes such factors as capabilities of the presenting hospital, capacity at the receiving hospital, financial, geographic, and patient-p...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 29, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Leah Feazel, Adam B. Schlichting, Gregory R. Bell, Dan M. Shane, Azeemuddin Ahmed, Brett Faine, Andrew Nugent, Nicholas M. Mohr Tags: Review Source Type: research

Achieving regionalization through rural interhospital transfer
Regionalization of emergency medical care aims to provide consistent and efficient high-quality care leading to optimal clinical outcomes by matching patient needs with appropriate resources at a network of hospitals. Regionalized care has been shown to improve outcomes in trauma, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac arrest, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In rural areas, effective regionalization often requires interhospital transfer. The decision to transfer is complex and includes such factors as capabilities of the presenting hospital; capacity at the receiving hospital; and financial, geographic, and patien...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 29, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Leah Feazel, Adam B. Schlichting, Gregory R. Bell, Dan M. Shane, Azeemuddin Ahmed, Brett Faine, Andrew Nugent, Nicholas M. Mohr Tags: Review Source Type: research

Cerebral Oximetry with Cerebral Blood Volume Index (CBVI) in detecting Pediatric Strokes in a Pediatric Emergency Department
Despite pediatric stroke awareness and Pediatric Stroke Activation systems, recognition and imaging delays along with activation inconsistency still occurs. Reliable objective pediatric stroke detection tool are needed to improve detection and activations. Cerebral rcSO2 with cerebral blood volume index (CBVI) can detect abnormal cerebral physiology.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Thomas J. Abramo, Z. Leah Harris, Mark Meredith, Kristen Crossman, Abby Williams, Sheila McMorrow, Jennifer Dindo, Angela Gordon, Maria Melguizo-Castro, Zhuopei Hu, Todd Nick Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Bradycardia caused by Intravenous Nicardipine in an Elderly Patient with Acute Ischemic Infarct
We report the case of an elderly patient with an acute ischemic stroke who developed nicardipineinduced bradycardia in the ED.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 17, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael E. Abboud, Sarah E. Frasure Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Brugada Electrocardiogram Pattern Induced by Cannabis; is cannabis safe?
The objective of this study was to present a case report that bring attention to relationship between cannabis consumption and Brugada electrocardiogram pattern (BEP). Here we present a case of a 19-year-old male patient with symptomatic BEP induced after cannabis consumption. With the potential for more widespread legalization of cannabis several studies are raising the issue of adverse vascular effects of cannabis, including myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, cardiomyopathy, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and cannabis arteritis.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joaquín Valle Alonso, Beatrix Theo, F. Javier Fonseca del Pozo, Miguel Angel Aguayo, Almudena Sanchez Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Admission serum lactate predicts mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage
Aneurysmal SAH is the most devastating form of hemorrhagic stroke. Primary predictors of mortality are based on initial clinical presentation. Initial serum lactic acid levels have been shown to predict mortality and disease severity. Initial serum lactate may be an objective predictor or mortality.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Imo P. Aisiku, Peng Roc Chen, Hanh Truong, Daniel R. Monsivais, Jonathan Edlow Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Protective effects of cyclosporine A and hypothermia on neuronal mitochondria in a rat asphyxial cardiac arrest model
Cyclosporine A (CsA) was neuroprotective in the settings of traumatic brain injury and stroke. We sought to investigate the protective effects of CsA and hypothermia on neuronal mitochondria after cardiac arrest.Methods and Results.Five groups were included: sham (S), normothermia (N), CsA (C), hypothermia (H), and CsA plus hypothermia (C+H). Cardiac arrest was induced by 10min of asphyxia. CsA (10mg/kg) was administered immediately after return of spontaneous circulation in the CsA groups. Temperature of the rats was maintained at 33±0.5°C after return of spontaneous circulation in the hypothermia groups.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jie Liu, Yue Wang, Qiwei Zhuang, Meng Chen, Yufeng Wang, Lina Hou, Fei Han Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome: a rare postoperative complication of carotid endarterectomy
Acute neurological deficits are common presentations to the emergency department. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome, a rare phenomenon which can occur within one month following carotid surgical revascularization, may be challenging for the emergency physician to diagnose in the setting of an acute neurological presentation. Carotid arterial disease contributes 15-20% of ischemic cerebrovascular accidents and surgical revascularization is the commonest intervention for preventing stroke in patients with significant carotid disease.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mina Guirgis, Kishore Sieunarine Source Type: research

The Utility of Bolus IV Nicardipine for Hypertensive Emergencies in the Emergency Department
We describe the first two documented cases of use of nicardipine administered as an IV bolus dose in the emergency department for hypertensive emergencies involving acute ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 21, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephanie N. Komura, Nadia I. Awad Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

The utility of bolus intravenous nicardipine for hypertensive emergencies in the ED
We describe the first 2 documented cases of use of nicardipine administered as an IV bolus dose in the emergency department (ED) for hypertensive emergencies involving acute ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 21, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephanie N. Komura, Nadia I. Awad Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Higher prehospital blood pressure prolongs door to needle thrombolysis times: a target for quality improvement?
Per the American Heart Association guidelines, blood pressure (BP) should be less than 185/110 to be eligible for stroke thrombolysis. No studies have focused on prehospital BP and its impact on door to needle (DTN) times. We hypothesized that DTN times would be longer for patients with higher prehospital BP.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 16, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Digvijaya D. Navalkele, Chunyan Cai, Farhaan Vahidy, Mohammad H. Rahbar, Renganayaki Pandurengan, Tzu-Ching Wu, Amrou Sarraj, Andrew Barreto, James C. Grotta, Nicole Gonzales Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Letter in response to: Hyperthermia and severe rhabdomyolysis from synthetic cannabinoids. Am J Emerg Med 2016;34:121.e1–2. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2015.05.052. Epub 2015 Jun. 12
We read with great interest the case report by Sweeney et al. [1] discussing severe hyperthermia and rhabdomyolysis following a reported exposure to a synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist (SCRA). SCRA exposures, first reported in NYC in 2010, were at an all-time high in 2015 [2]. Confirmed cases of significant SCRA-associated acute kidney injury, stroke and acute psychosis are reported [3,4].
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 11, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Su, Larissa Laskowski, Robert S. Hoffman Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Wallenberg's Lateral Medullary Syndrome in an Adolescent
Concussion and sports-related injuries are common in children. Given the heightened awareness about concussion in recent years, there has been an increase in the diagnosis of concussion in children presenting to the emergency department with head injuries. Often, little consideration is given to other etiologies of neurologic symptoms such as stroke. This may be due to the fact that stroke is uncommon in children when compared to adults. However, there are several case reports of arterial dissection and stroke in the pediatric age group resulting from trivial trauma.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 12, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elizabeth Ruedrich, Mahesh Chikkannaiah, Gogi Kumar Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Differentiating contrast staining after acute ischemic stroke from hemorrhagic transformation during emergency evaluation
A hyperdense lesion observed in a computed tomography (CT) image of the brain is usually suspected to be a hemorrhage during an emergency evaluation. Other rare differential diagnoses include contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIN) and acute cerebral infarction with contrast staining (CS). Recent contrast administration is a common risk factor for both CIN and CS. The former has been associated with favorable neurological outcomes, whereas CS might have complications, such as hemorrhagic transformation (HT).
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sing-Kong Ho, Jen-Kuang Lee, Yen-Jun Lai, Tzu-Chiao Lin, Cheng-Wei Liu Source Type: research

Fatal hemopericardium after intravenous recombinant transplasminogeen activator (rt-PA) for acute ischaemic stroke
A 57-year old man presented to the emergency department with complaints of nausea, fatigue and burning throat which had been present since one week. Except for mild mental retardation and epilepsy for which anti-epileptic medication was used, he was healthy. Physical examination was normal except for tachycardia (133 beats /minute). Laboratory investigation showed creatine kinase (CK) of 220 U/L (10–171), CK-MB 15 U/L (0–15) and troponine 10,8 ug/L (
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 27, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hanna Hensen, Fianne Spaander, Matthijs Bax, Hille Koppen Source Type: research

2016: Emergency Medical Services Annotated Literature in Review
In the daily practice of emergency medicine, physicians constantly interact with components of emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The provision of high quality care in the prehospital setting requires emergency physicians to remain abreast of recent literature that may inform the care of patients prior to their arrival at the emergency department. This literature review will examine some recent trends in the prehospital literature, including cardiac arrest care, trauma, myocardial infarction, and stroke.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jose V. Nable, Benjamin J. Lawner, William J. Brady Source Type: research

Hyperthermia and Severe Rhabdomyolysis From Synthetic Cannabinoids Am J Emerg Med 2016;34:121.e1-2. Doi: 10.1016/j.Ajem.2015.05.052. Epub 2015 Jun 12
We read with great interest the case report by Sweeney et al. [1] discussing severe hyperthermia and rhabdomyolysis following a reported exposure to a synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist (SCRA). SCRA exposures, first reported in NYC in 2010, were at an all-time high in 2015 [2]. Confirmed cases of significant SCRA-associated acute kidney injury, stroke, and acute psychosis are reported [3,4].
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 11, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Su, Larissa Laskowski, Robert S. Hoffman Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

2016: Emergency Medical Services Annotated Literature in Review
In the daily practice of emergency medicine, physicians constantly interact with components of emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The provision of high quality care in the prehospital setting requires emergency physicians to remain abreast of recent literature that may inform the care of patients prior to their arrival at the emergency department. This literature review will examine some recent trends in the prehospital literature, including cardiac arrest care, trauma, myocardial infarction, and stroke.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jose V. Nable, Benjamin J. Lawner, William J. Brady Source Type: research

Differentiating contrast staining after acute ischemic stroke from hemorrhagic transformation during emergency evaluation
A hyperdense lesion observed in a computed tomographic (CT) image of the brain is usually suspected to be a hemorrhage during an emergency evaluation. Other rare differential diagnoses include contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIN) and acute cerebral infarction with contrast staining (CS). Recent contrast administration is a common risk factor for both CIN and CS. The former has been associated with favorable neurologic outcomes, whereas CS might have complications, such as hemorrhagic transformation (HT).
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sing-Kong Ho, Jen-Kuang Lee, Yen-Jun Lai, Tzu-Chiao Lin, Cheng-Wei Liu Tags: Case Report Source Type: research