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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post

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Total 340 results found since Jan 2013.

7 Ways to Permanently Banish Belly Fat
Sixty-nine percent of Americans adults are overweight, and over 35 percent are obese. Obesity increases your risk for numerous conditions including heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancer. Sadly, about 3.4 million adults die each year from being overweight or obese. Globally obesity now kills about the same as tobacco and all wars, terrorism and violence. Nearly all people who are overweight already have "pre-diabetes" and have significant risks of disease and death. They just don't know it. When you begin to put on weight, especially lethal belly fat, your biology shifts out of balance, v...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I Go Red for Mis Abuelas
By Chef Hamlet Garcia Five years ago I became a national volunteer spokesperson for the American Heart Association's Go Red for Women campaign. To this day, many people ask me why I support this cause and not others. The answer is that I carry this cause in my heart. I was raised under the guidance and care of two great women. They both had simple, strong personalities with a tempered focus in their actions. They were heads of families, paternal and maternal, and for me they became much more than that: They were teachers, friends and even confidantes. My "Nona" (grandmother) Alcira, the mother of my mother, certainly wa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

9 Ways To Fall Asleep Faster (Without Counting Sheep)
By Alex Orlov for Life by DailyBurn If you feel wide awake when your head hits the pillow at night, you're not alone. Approximately 60 million Americans report having experienced insomnia in any given year, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Even worse, 40 million Americans suffer from long-term sleep disorders. Missing sleep is nothing to yawn about. "Chronic sleep deprivation has lots of negative consequences," says Sonia Ancoli-Israel, fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and professor of psychiatry at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. She not...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cholesterol, Unscrambled
There seems to be a whole lot of passion in response to the recent disclosure that this year's Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is recommending we stop fretting about cholesterol. Note that the committee merely advises, so these are not yet the official dietary guidelines for Americans. Famously, the politicians have the final say there. That passion over cholesterol runs in both directions, with enthusiasts of more animal food intake -- Paleo, dieters, for instance -- feeling vindicated; and my vegan friends contending that an excess of cholesterol must have scrambled the brains of the Advisory Committee members, a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Weekly Rune -- Ingwaz
For the week of 15 February 2015 With bright Sowilo guiding our half-month, this week's stave, Ingwaz, brings our attention to community, and how we're situated in it. All signs point to this as a time of movement, of interconnection with others and self, and of the tending required to spark new creative territory. Sowilu warms us through 27 February, granting us a boost of inspiration. With Ingwaz at the helm this week, we have a focus to which we can direct that inspiration. Learn more about the half-month rune's influence. Read right to left in the image is Sowilu, then Ingwaz. Buckeye Runes by S. Kelley harrellWith...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can a Broken Heart Really Break Your Heart?
Is there anything more soul-crushing than losing someone you love? Whether it be the end of a romantic relationship or the death of someone you care about deeply, a broken heart is one of the most emotionally intense experiences any of us will ever go through. There is no doubt that losing a loved one can greatly affect your emotional and mental state, but what are the physical effects on the body? And can a broken heart actually break your heart? Studies show that emotional distress does indeed affect the physical body in a number of different ways. First of all, emotional pain causes blood to flow to regions of the brai...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Many African Americans Still Only Dream of High Quality Health Care
Recently, AARP conducted a study to determine how perceptions of key social issues ranked in importance to African Americans age 50 and over. Ninety-one percent gave the answer "high quality health care." Eighty-nine percent gave the answer, "Access to high quality health care information." We were not surprised at the high percentage of either response. Why wouldn't the foremost issue on the minds of African Americans be the key issue that would prolong, enhance or save lives? Why wouldn't the dominant issue on the minds of Black people age 50 and over be their health; even more so than education, employment and access t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Traumatic Brain Injuries, Stem Cells and Children: A Conversation With Dr. Charles Cox
One of the world's leading experts on cellular therapies for traumatic brain injury (TBI), Dr. Cox directs the Pediatric Surgical Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, as well as the Pediatric Trauma Program at the University of Texas-Houston/Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital in the Texas Medical Center. He is the author of over 120 scientific publications and 20 book chapters and has served on scientific study sections/review groups for the NIH, American Heart Association, Veterans Affairs MERIT Awards, Department of Defense and C...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What You Should Know Before You Schedule Your Next Doctor Appointment
Before we were able to Google our every itch and twinge and ache, we had very different relationships with our doctors. “In the early years of my career, information was something the doctor had and the patient didn’t,” Dr. Michael L. LeFevre, a professor and physician at the University of Missouri, tells The Huffington Post. Today, he says, patients bring their information to him for his input. “They want my opinion about how good the information is and what it means and how to interpret it for them in their lives.” Of course, the Internet is rife with misinformation, and sometimes a well-meaning patient will ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Moon Really Could Not Be More Obvious About This
Sometimes you lay awake thinking about all of the things. It's 1 a.m. and your eyes snap open because your brain simply could not wait one more second to tell you: WHAT ABOUT THESE (MOSTLY IMAGINARY) PROBLEMS?? Had you thought about THOSE THINGS? You kick the sheets, trying to kick the thoughts. No go. Night follows night. You are no stranger to the darkness. But then one night you lay awake thinking about none of the things. Ambivalence -- the most insidious emotion -- skewers its claws into your ribcage. It's too exhausting to care. What's the point? At 3:26 a.m. that night, just as you are finally drifting off to...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ebola Epidemic Takes a Toll on Sierra Leone's Surgeons
This article originally appeared here on ScientificAmerican.com. Thaim Kamara is 60 years old and would like to retire this year. But he is one of only eight remaining surgeons in Sierra Leone, a west African country of about 6 million people. Kamara lost two friends to Ebola in 2014 -- Martin Salia and Thomas Rogers, fellow surgeons at Connaught Hospital in the capital, Freetown. In light of the dire circumstances, Kamara has postponed his plan to retire. Although the rate of new Ebola infections in Sierra Leone, along with neighboring countries Guinea and Liberia, is finally falling, more than 800 health care personnel...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Scary Symptoms That Are Usually Harmless
SPECIAL FROM Next Avenue By Linda Melone After 50, aches, pains and the occasional muscle twinge become a fact of life. But some symptoms that may seem frightening or serious turn out to be far less than they appear. While you should always see a doctor if you experience something out of the ordinary, these signs generally are more smoke than fire: A Bloody Nose Nosebleeds can be particularly frightening due to the suddenness in which they occur and the sometimes large amount of blood involved. “People worry that it’s internal bleeding, but almost every time it’s not,” says Dr. Carlo Reyes, emergency room...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Power of Touch Between Mom And Baby
There is something about seeing a mom hold her baby for the first time that never gets old. Everything about that moment, from the way she's cuddling her baby, to seeing her stroke his or her head -- you just know she wants to do what's best for her baby. As a nurse and through my work with the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), I have been very fortunate to meet moms and babies all over the world. Most recently, on a trip side by side with JOHNSON'S®, I traveled to China and India, where I learned more about their people's customs and practices, including how women touch and hold the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Simple Things You Can Do to Improve Your Mental Wellness
I previously wrote about the symptoms of depression and provided a guide to treat depression. However, many of the same behavioral activation techniques that are used in the treatment of depression can improve your mental wellness even if you do not suffer from depression. Changing your habits and daily routine to include activities that are known to improve mood, energy and physical and mental health is easy and can be very enjoyable. You do not need to buy anything, you do not need to take medication, and you can start feeling better today! These are four easy things you can do to make yourself more mentally and physica...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Get Over Abandonment -- a Fast Track
When something triggers our primal abandonment pain -- like a breakup, getting fired or rejected by school admissions, or dissed by a friend -- it can be so ferocious and debilitating that we'd do almost anything to get past it. Some people have been know to fly across country to attend an abandonment workshop, arriving haggard, jet lagged, and desperate to wrest themselves from abandonment's death grip as fast as possible. Although the magic bullet they are hoping for does not exist, abandonment workshops, both peer or professionally led, accelerate forward movement, in part by providing people the opportunity to shar...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Scary Way Excessive Salt Intake May 'Reprogram' The Brain
There are many health reasons to lay off the salt, from fluid retention to an increased risk over time of developing high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke. While the link between sodium and hypertension is nothing new (thought some scientists say it is overstated), the precise mechanisms by which sodium can raise blood pressure have been less clear. According to new research from McGill University, too much sodium may actually "reprogram" the brain in a way that interferes with a process that normally keeps the body's arterial blood pressure at a healthy level. "We found that a period of high dietary salt inta...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Phoenix Woman Dies After Giving BIrth To Quadruplets
Jan 17 (Reuters) - Thousands of dollars of donations have poured in from around the world to help pay for the care for newborn quadruplets of a Phoenix mother who died after giving birth to them, a fundraising website set up in the woman's name announced on Saturday. The story of Erica Morales drew international attention when the 36-year-old died shortly after giving birth to three girls and a boy on Thursday, according to a report on television station KSAZ in Phoenix. "She never got to hold them; she never got to see them," Morales' cousin, Nicole Todman, told the station. "It is so hard to know she fought...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Surprising Connection Between Problem Drinking And Working Too Much
If you're always working late, your job could be taking a toll on your health in more ways than you may realize, new research suggests. Publishing in the British Medical Journal Tuesday, a systematic review and meta-analysis explored the potential link between the number of hours a person works and their alcohol consumption arrived at a startling conclusion: people who work more than 48 hours each week are 13 percent more likely to drink a risky amount of alcohol than those who work 35 to 40 hours each week. The analysis, which was completed by a team of researchers in Finland, included 81 studies representing more than...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Healthy Eating Habits To Adopt This Year
By Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD Nutrition is a hot topic these days, yet many of my clients still struggle with consistently following through with "the basics," and the stats show that missing the mark on many healthy habits is the norm. For example, the median daily intake of produce for U.S. adults is 1.1 servings of fruit and 1.6 servings of veggies, far below the minimum recommended five daily servings. If you're going to set just one goal for 2015, I think eating more produce should be it, but I've also listed four others below. I know you've heard them before, but they are without a doubt the most tried-and-true, impactf...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prevention Science Should Be a Higher Federal Funding Priority
This study highlights inadequate investment of federal funding for science that will help us better prevent chronic disease. Investing in prevention -- and prevention science -- should become a much higher priority for federal research. It's essential if the United States is to improve the health of our population and save future generations of Americans from the burden of preventable disease.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8 Reasons You Get Dizzy
SPECIAL FROM Grandparents.com Who hasn’t gotten up quickly from sitting down and felt a little bit dizzy? Or had a stomach virus and things spun a bit? But while dizziness can be a side effect of minor health issues, it can also be a sign of a serious health problem. “Dizziness is absolutely not normal,” says Donnica Moore, M.D., president of Sapphire Women’s Health Group in Chester, N.J. “It tells you that something is wrong. It could be something simple and very easy to fix or it could be a sign of something else going on in your body.” Dizziness is a more common complaint among older adults—probably bec...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

9 Art Therapy Techniques To Help You De-Stress In 2015
Welcome to the New Year! Whether you're already hard at work making your fresh batch of New Year's resolutions a reality, or still nursing your hangover and breaking all of them at once, we're here to ease you into equilibrium with a little dose of calmness and creativity. The following art therapy techniques are designed to stimulate the imagination and soothe the soul with easy exercises for anyone from age five to 100. What better way to ring in 2015 than making an effort to let simple creative expression ease out those inner knots and work you into a state of inspired self-possession? Art therapy is a form of therapy ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Having a Happy Vegan Holiday Matters
I love this time of the year because, to me, the holidays really emphasize how important it is to be kind to one another. With every email that ends "Have a Happy Holiday!" I'm reminded that during the rest of the year we often let the busy-ness of our lives overtake our sense of humanity and kindness. At the end of the year we change: Charities report higher donations, we remember the family member or friend we haven't spoken to all year, and we take the time to smile at strangers. This year I would like us to consider extending that kindness to all creatures -- those we share our couches with and those we share the plan...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 25, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC's Mission: Protecting the Health of Americans
There is no doubt Ebola will rank as the biggest public health story of 2014, both here in the United States and around the world: more people sickened by Ebola than ever before in history, more people dying, and more understanding of how the health of one nation affects the health of us all. Today, more than 170 of CDC's top health professionals are in West Africa working to stop the current Ebola epidemic and leave behind stronger public health systems. Many hundreds more support their work at home. Leaving behind better capacities to find, stop, and prevent health threats in affected countries will help prevent the ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 24, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prayers, Facebook and Weight Loss
"When people talk to God, it is called prayer. When God talks to people, they call it schizophrenia." -- Dr. Jim Roach in his upcoming book, God's House Calls "Just like a prayer. Your voice can take me there" -- Madonna Until recently, my attitude toward prayer had been guided by President Harry S. Truman who said that "people who pray the loudest are the ones you lock your hen house from." I've always been intensely suspicious of anyone who seems too overt in their embrace of prayer, especially if the conversation deviates to matters concerning my checkbook or wallet. Praying out loud was something I never did. Unti...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pizza Hut's Pizza Is Saltier In America Than Anywhere Else In The World
America, we've got a salt problem. This year, the CDC reported that nine out of 10 kids in the U.S. consume too much salt. This is not because children are latched on to the salt shaker, but rather the foods they most commonly eat (like pizza, burgers, meats and cheeses) are already laden with the stuff. American adults have not grown out of the habit. The FDA recommends the average American consumes no more than 2,300 mg of salt per day, but the average American ingests about 1,000 mg over budget. It seems limiting our salt consumption may be easier said than done. A recent international survey released by World Action...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I'm a Person With a Disability and My Body Is Not a Mistake
This article is an excerpt of writings regarding body acceptance while living with a disability. As a young woman in my early twenties with a physical disability, I've come to accept and own the body I've been given regardless of society's pressures and conception of able-bodied beauty. Life has given me twists and turns, and at times I've been confused as to which way is up. People have told me that I'm weak -- that I won't measure up to anything, that my dreams cannot be fulfilled. And science cannot treat or stop a progressive disease. I've been left to fend for myself. My innocence stripped away and abandoned as a c...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Long You Sleep May Be In Your Genes
This study is one of the first to begin identifying these genetic differences, and will hopefully help us better understand the causes of sleep disorders and their relation to other important conditions, such as diabetes and psychiatric disorders." [5 Things You Must Know About Sleep] Previous research has linked both sleeping too much and sleeping too little with health problems such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, psychiatric illness and even premature mortality, according to the study. For example, in a 2013 study published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers found that the risk of type 2 diabetes wa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mediterranean Diet Could Mend Hearts In Erectile Dysfunction Sufferers, Study Says
Suffering from erectile dysfunction? Then you may want to consider a Mediterranean diet for help with heart health. It's estimated that as many as 30 million men in the U.S. suffer from erectile dysfunction, which is most commonly caused by disease or injury elsewhere in the body -- not just "old age." According to the National Institutes of Health, diseases like heart disease, high blood pressure and atherosclerosis are among the most common culprits -- as they can cause damage to the arteries and restrict blood flow. "Erectile dysfunction is not a symptom of aging, it is a bad sign from the body that something is wrong...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Good Reasons To Get A Flu Shot
By Melaina Juntti for Men's Journal How many times have you heard you should get a flu shot? There's good reason for the hype: Over the past few years, the influenza vaccine has prevented millions of flu cases and tens of thousands of related hospitalizations, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although an increasing number of people are getting vaccinated every year, more than half of American men still aren't doing it, for a variety of reasons, most of which aren't backed by science. "Men have this macho sense that if they do get the flu, they can tough it out," says William Schaffner, M.D., chair...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Depression: It's Not Just in Your Head, It's Also in Your Genes
This study demonstrated shorter telomeres in daughters of moms who had depression and greater hormonal reactivity to stress in these girls. When the girls were followed until age 18, 60 percent of those in the high-risk group developed depression, a condition that was not evident when they were first studied. The telomere was a biomarker, an individual hallmark that a person is at higher risk for an illness -- in this case for depression. We already knew that shortened telomeres were a risk factor for chronic, physical diseases but now the evidence is emerging for its likely role in depression. Should you go out and get ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your Credit Rating Might Predict How Likely It Is You'll Have A Heart Attack
A new study has found that your credit rating may be able to predict how likely you are to have a heart attack or stroke. The multi-decade study, which was published last week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was performed by Duke University psychologists who looked at the cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes status and smoking habits of over 1,000 New Zealanders -- and then compared their findings to those people’s credit ratings. The study found that people with lower credit scores were more likely to be at risk for cardiovascular disease. That, the study said, is because the same fa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 25, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8 Whole Grains You're Probably Not Eating
By Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD You've probably had oatmeal for breakfast, and if you haven't yet tried quinoa I bet you've heard of it, or have seen it on a menu or social media recipe (it's all over Pinterest!). But there are many other whole grains you may not be familiar with, and incorporating them into your food repertoire is well worth the learning curve. Whole grains are white hot among chefs and nutritionists. They're versatile, satisfying and in addition to providing slow-burning starch (think sustained energy!), vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, whole grains are health protective. Their consumption is tied to a lo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Give Thanks for Your Eyes: 7 Amazing Facts
As Thanksgiving fast approaches, we're reminded to give thanks for the wonderful things in our lives: our loved ones, our freedom and most certainly our good health. As humans, we're extremely visual creatures, so as you look upon the joyous gathering of friends and family prior to feasting, consider taking a moment to give thanks for your healthy eyesight as well. Many of us are guilty of taking some of the most wondrous and spectacular things about how our bodies function for granted. I think it was Ben Franklin who remarked how people marvel at beautiful vistas, but forget about the miracle of the human body. For examp...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

We Must Beat Alzheimer's Before It Beats Us! And Here's How!
Alzheimer's Has Become the Scariest Disease of Later Life It's true. In a new Age Wave/Merrill Lynch study titled Health and Retirement: Planning for the Great Unknown, we surveyed a representative sample of over 3,000 Americans to uncover both their hopes and their concerns about health and healthcare expenses. Overwhelmingly, the study respondents said that the most important ingredient for a happy retirement is health. And while all diseases can disrupt both health and wealth in retirement, people of all ages now say the scariest disabling condition in later life is Alzheimer's disease. In fact, Alzheimer's was cited...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Amy Poehler Struggles With Sleep Just Like The Rest Of Us
You'd think the juggling act of raising two young sons, producing, acting and sometimes directing the final season of "Parks and Recreation," hosting the 2013 and 2014 Golden Globes and maintaining her besties status with Seth Meyers and Tiny Fey would be tiring enough. But actress Amy Poehler doesn't curl into bed at night and fall asleep immediately out of pure exhaustion. In her recently released memoir Yes Please, Poehler hilariously chronicles major events in her life with wisdom and ease -- including her early Chicago improv days, kicking ass as a waitress, getting hired for "Saturday Night Live" at age 30, her marr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

We Are Our Shadows
The same year the Dalai Lama won the Nobel Peace Prize, 1989, I had my first panic attack. It was my freshman year in college and in the midst of hip-hop, frozen yogurt and scrunchies, I was celebrating independence from my parents for the first time but struggling academically. I had never defined myself as anxious, nervous or worried. Instead I was the girl who doesn't worry about anything. That's how my family had always described me, and I played the part well. As I stood in the emergency room breathing into a bag, doctors urging me to go on medication for my anxiety, I began to question my own sanity. These panic att...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Taming Your Mind
With mindfulness practice, you eventually tame, calm, and befriend that bucking bronco of a mind, gently taking the reins and steering it where you want. If you whip or treat a horse cruelly it will most likely throw you into the dirt and probably stamp on you for good measure. If you're gentle with it, soothing it, giving it a little stroke, it will eventually calm down. Same with the mind; if you're self-critical and demanding, not only do you suffer but now you admonish yourself for your suffering with, "I shouldn't feel this way. I'm making myself feel this way because I'm such a ... [fill in the blank but make it nast...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You're Eating Fish All Wrong
By Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD Eating fish has been tied with lower rates of heart disease, stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease. But how you eat it may be the real key to reaping its benefits. Recent research from University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine concluded that study volunteers who regularly ate fish had larger brain volumes in regions associated with memory and cognition, but only if the fish baked or broiled, not fried. Baking and broiling are also better for your waistline. For example, a dozen fried shrimp can pack 280 calories, versus a mere 85 calories for 12 shrimp that have been steamed or broiled. To...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 6 Golden Rules Of A Healthy Grocery Cart
By Kristin Kirkpatrick for U.S. News i like to think of myself as a fairly non-judgmental kind of girl. The problem is, when I'm waiting in the grocery store checkout line, that persona goes out the store's sliding doors. As I wait for my turn, I find myself examining the contents of others' carts, and sometimes -- dare I say -- I judge. If I see a basket of cookies and cola, for example, I have to resist the urge to turn around and ask, "Why?" The same is true when I see a family wheeling a full cart -- without a single vegetable or fruit. Most frustrating, though, is when I see what appears to be a well-intentioned att...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news