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Reminder: Smoking Hookah For An Hour Is Like Smoking 100 Cigarettes
You hopefully wouldn't smoke 100 cigarettes in 60 minutes -- that's five entire packs of so-called cancer sticks.  If you casually dabble with hookah, however, you might not bat an eye at an hour-long smoking session. New research shows lots of young people don't know that 100 cigarettes and an hour of hookah are about equal in terms of the amount of smoke inhaled -- and therefore in the damage they can cause to a person's health, including increased risk for heart disease, cancers, stroke, blood clots and death, to name a few. A 2005 report by the World Health Organization found that hookah smokers typ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Science-Backed Reason For Leaving Work Early Today
Burning the midnight oil? You could put yourself at risk for a stroke. Workers who put in 55 hours per week or more had a 33 percent greater risk of stroke and a 13 percent greater risk of heart disease than people who worked 35 to 40 hours per week, according to study just published in the medical journal The Lancet.  Interestingly, the study didn't find a difference in stroke risk between men and women, between older workers and younger workers, or between workers of different socioeconomic statuses. Instead, the more an individual worked, the greater his or her risk of stroke.  "It was surprising," Mika Kivima...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Best Protein You Can Eat, According To Nutritionists
Protein is the key to keeping cravings at bay, building lean muscle and dropping those last few pounds. But according to a new review published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, it’s not just how much protein you eat that’s important: It's where you get your protein that also matters. The reason is threefold. First of all, every source of protein -- from chicken to peanuts -- contains a different array of amino acids, the building blocks of protein. Of the 20 various amino acids, nine are “essential,” meaning you can only get them from food. So it’s especiall...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 5 Best Cardio Workouts That Don't Involve Running
Photo: Pond5 By Laurel Leicht for Life by DailyBurn Sure, running is a great workout to have as a part of your cardio repertoire -- it's not only a great way to get fitter, but it improves your mental wellbeing, too. (Read one woman's story about how running saved her life.) But it's not right for everyone, and more importantly, running is not the only way to stay in shape. In fact, there are many different types of dynamic cardio workouts that give you a stellar calorie burn, while sculpting muscle at the same time. Try these five workouts on for size -- but, instead of going through the motions, maximize your efforts w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Southern Diet: Dead on Arrival
We probably could have predicted the outcomes of a recent and well done study. Does a typical Southern diet, rich in fried foods, fatty foods, eggs, processed meats like bacon and ham, organ meats, and sugar rich drinks, promote heart disease? Some clues were available. The yearly map of rates of obesity by state in the U.S. show the Southeast to have the greatest problem with weight. Paula Dean and her cooking led to her declaration that she had diabetes and changes in her recipes. Now researchers from the National Institutes of Health have put the "sugar coating" on the topic by providing strong data condemning this patt...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Testosterone Therapy Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be, Study Finds
Millions of men, mostly over the age of 50, are now using testosterone therapy to treat a broad array of symptoms -- erectile dysfunction, weight gain, listlessness -- thought to be caused by low testosterone levels, which the pharmaceutical industry in copious advertising calls "Low-T."  But a major new study from a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston -- one of the biggest double-blinded studies of the therapy so far -- indicates that testosterone doesn't work as advertised. The team, led by endocrinologist Dr. Shalender Bhasin, gave 306 men over the age of 60, all of whom had low ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two Great Things Exercise Is Guaranteed to Do For You
Everyone knows that exercise is good for your heart. That's not one of the two things I was talking about, but it's good to remember. Stroke and heart disease are two of the leading causes of death in the U.S. and no one wants to die sooner than necessary! The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as of last month were telling us two and a half hours of exercise could lower your risk for these diseases. You don't need to run a marathon or climb Half-Dome at Yosemite. You just need to do some moderate intensity aerobic activity. For any of you who don't know it, weight-bearing workouts (cables, weights etc.) are defi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vicky's Story
My older sister, Vicky, never listened to authority. One of my earliest childhood memories was around age four, seeing my Mom whip Vicky with a long tree twig to the point she was bleeding. My mother, a frustrated widow raising five girls on meager Social Security benefits in rural southeast Missouri used the only form of discipline she knew -- corporal punishment. As Vicky's 10-year-old old legs, back, and buttocks became covered in red dotted lines, she never cried or moaned. Instead she looked straight ahead, stone-faced. Mom perceived her look as defiance and gave her more lashings than she should have that day. Event...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here's the Real Reason You're Not Getting Seven Hours of Sleep
You've done the impossible. You've shut your devices, learned how to meditate, stretched into downward-dog and cut out double-shot espressos. You've said "no" to late night social activities and you've ruled out possible sleep disorders. After sipping chamomile tea, you crawl under the puffy down covers feeling calm and ready for a solid seven hours of sleep. So why are you staring at the ceiling four hours later? Don't misunderstand me. These sleep hacks are valuable. They'll surely transition you from the frantic pace of the day, but you still can't sleep through the night. SLEEP CAN BE ANXIETY-PRODUCING Let's face it. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Walmart Introduces Car Seat That Could Prevent Infant Heat Stroke Death
On July 23, Walmart unveiled a new car seat that may save young children from hot car deaths and injuries. Manufactured by Evenflo and sold exclusively at Walmart, the car seat has an alert system that reminds drivers when a child is still buckled in after the ignition is shut off.  "The Evenflo Advanced SensorSafe™ Embrace Infant Car Seat car seat uses a wireless receiver that plugs into a car’s On Board Diagnostic (OBD) port and syncs with the chest clip that goes around the baby," a representative for the retailer told The Huffington Post in an email. If the car is shut off while the harness chest ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Respect the Distance
Dolphins swimming with triathletes in Santa Barbara, California A triathlete endures a beautiful mix of mental and physical feats up to the point when the animated race announcer signals the start of a triathlon. The draw for an amateur triathlete, such as myself, is to compete against one person. Myself. Competing with myself starts with learning to respect the distance by training and preparing months and even years in advance. Training gives an athlete a level of physical and mental confidence to push hard during the race. Athletes break personal barriers by setting goals in training and in the races. Here is a sample...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your Active Social Life Could Help You Live Longer
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two Tests to Predict How Long You Might Live
In this study of over 6,500 adults (at least 52 years of age), participants were asked that question. Over 8 years of follow-up, people who felt at least 3 years younger than their actual age were less likely to die than those who felt their actual age or older. There are lots of reasons why this might make sense. If you feel older than your age, you probably already have some underlying health conditions. Or you might be depressed which we know leads to increased mortality. If you don't feel "right," you need to listen to your body, and realize it is telling you that you need to get it checked. And the lesson here would b...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In Alzheimer's Disease, Caregiving May Be Just As Trying As the Disease Itself
When most of us think of Alzheimer's disease, our first thought isn't usually of the quiet caregiver alongside the patient, devoting their time to helping someone living with the disease. But caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease is often a full-time job, taking its toll on the caregiver. According to AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving, the "typical" family caregiver is a 49-year-old woman who takes care of a relative. Nearly 25 percent of America's caregivers are millennials (adults aged 18 to 34) and are more likely to be female than male. In fact, 66 percent of all caregivers are women, and female care...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Personalizing Medicine: Considering Preferences and Values
If you're interested in heart disease -- and who over the age of 40 isn't? -- you may have read an excellent series of articles by reporter Gina Kolata recently published in the New York Times. If you haven't seen it, the series includes pieces on blood pressure, stents, heart attack treatment and a new approach to aortic valve replacement. The heart valve article especially caught my eye, as this is a story I've been watching with personal interest: My 90-year-old mother has aortic stenosis for which surgery has been recommended. In fact, surgery was first recommended for my mom at least six years ago. I know that timing ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Lunacy and Rocket Science
The failure to use what we have known for more than two decades to prevent up to 80 percent of all major chronic disease -- heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, dementia -- is costing virtually every one of us years lost from lives we love, and life lost from years. Since this is all entirely fixable with knowledge long at our disposal, the calamity of it all is, in a word, lunacy. Of course, in the vernacular, that just means crazy. But the origins of the word point to the moon. And reflections on the moon, as it turns out, could prove... illuminating. There are footprints on the moon for three basic reasons. First,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Quality Of Health Care You Receive Likely Depends On Your Skin Color
Unequal health care continues to be a serious problem for black Americans. More than a decade after the Institute of Medicine issued a landmark report showing that minority patients were less likely to receive the same quality health care as white patients, racial and ethnic disparities continue to plague the U.S. health care system. That report, which was published in 2002, indicated that even when both groups had similar insurance or the same ability to pay for care, black patients received inferior treatment to white patients. This still hold true, according to our investigation into dozens of studies about black health...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seattle in Deep Sleep This Week
Seattle wasn't sleepless this week. Not after more than 4,000 sleep experts from around the world descended upon the Emerald City for SLEEP 2015, an annual conference sponsored by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society. Topics and research on all things related to sleep -- how much we need, how much we don't get, how much is disrupted by undiagnosed sleep disorders and how a better, cheaper, less obtrusive way to detect sleep apnea is needed -- were discussed. "Right now we don't have enough sleep clinics, sleep laboratories and sleep specialists in the country to address all the sleep apn...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saving and Improving Lives Mile By Mile, Coast to Coast
Since mid-March, they've been riding bicycles through communities from coast to coast. Perhaps you've heard about their efforts or even saw them roll through your area. Their aim is noble. Their journey proved to be more difficult than envisioned. They endured a tragedy halfway through. And a near tragedy at the start. And all that is on top of the devastating episode that birthed this whole thing. The ride is called Heart Across America. It's the brainchild of Sean Maloney, a former Intel executive who overcame a debilitating stroke to resume his life and career. Since beating those odds, Maloney set his sights ev...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Observing the Damaged Brain for Clues About Dreaming
Thanks to advanced and digital technologies, a close study of the dreaming brain is possible. Dream researchers use neural-imaging tools range from EEG to PET scan to MRI to observe the brain's activity while dreaming. In addition to observing healthy brain activity, scientists also use cases of brain injury and illness as a way to learn about the brain mechanics of dreaming. This approach -- of learning about the functions of the brain through abnormalities, injury, or illness -- is by no means just confined to the study of dreams. A great deal of what we know about the mechanics of the brain in general has come from ob...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Want to Reduce Your Chances of Going Into a Nursing Home? Raise a Daughter
If you ask people over the age of 65 what they fear most, I find that most people do not say a heart attack, but rather a stroke. "I don't want to be a burden to my family" is what many patients tell me. With improvements in health care technology, we are living longer. Some people are doing quite well functioning on their own, whereas others cannot live independently. And we all know there are things we can do to stay healthy longer -- keep blood pressure under control, keep lipids in a normal range, eat more fruits and vegetables, and exercise regularly. But there's one other factor that research has shown reduces one's ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Expert Tips on Rethinking Nutrition and Heart Health
Have kids, they said. Along with all the vomit and tears they will bring you joy, hilarity and fierce amounts of love (true, true.) But nobody ever mentioned they might concoct a "potion" that sits fermenting in an overlooked thermos for five days. Oh and that it might detonate in the kitchen in the dead of night. Have you ever cleaned out your toaster with a cotton bud? I have. It's hard. Especially when you really should be in bed and your heart is still somewhere outside your chest cavity. A few days previously I'd given the girls some random kitchen and craft ingredients to make their own potions -- magic medicine to...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hacking The Nervous System
(Photo: © Job Boot) One nerve connects your vital organs, sensing and shaping your health. If we learn to control it, the future of medicine will be electric.When Maria Vrind, a former gymnast from Volendam in the Netherlands, found that the only way she could put her socks on in the morning was to lie on her back with her feet in the air, she had to accept that things had reached a crisis point. “I had become so stiff I couldn’t stand up,” she says. “It was a great shock because I’m such an active person.”It was 1993. Vrind was in her late 40s and working two jobs, athletics coach and a carer for disabled ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Big Things We Learned About Sleep In The Past Decade
It's no secret that here at The Huffington Post, we love sleep -- and for good reason. Sleep has been called the "third pillar" of health, along with nutrition and exercise. Getting the quality sleep that you need has the power to protect your physical and mental health, while skipping out on sleep can seriously hurt your health, cognition and well-being over time. Over the past 10 years, sleep has finally become widely recognized as a critical aspect of good health, and new research has shed more light on its importance in our lives. Here's what we've learned. 1. A sleeping brain is an active brain. While you're re...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 8 Most Important Things We've Learned About Happiness In The Past 10 Years
We're living in a golden age of happiness -- the scientific study of happiness, at least. The field of positive psychology has exploded in growth since its inception in 1998, dramatically increasing our understanding of human flourishing. We now know more than ever about what makes us happy, how we can spread happiness socially and geographically, and how happiness affects our physical and mental health. But it's just the beginning. In the next decade, we're likely to see not only a greater understanding of positive emotions, but also the application of this research on a practical level to improve well-being on a globa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Your AC Making You Sick? 5 Things You Need to Know
There are times when I am extremely thankful for air conditioning -- usually after I have had a long workout on a hot summer's day and am still sweating after a cold shower. The cold, dry air is invigorating and refreshing. But usually, after about 30 minutes, I find myself shivering and needing to go back outside. Indeed, I have found that the majority of homes I have visited and more so, public offices and stores, the air conditioning temperature is set so low that I find myself feeling sick so that I have to step outside. I also find that I am more tired and my muscles more sore from shivering all day. So I decided to l...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Things I Wish I'd Known When I Was Younger
I am 64 years old. There, I admit it. Women don't always want to admit their age, but there is one really good thing about seeing the decades roll by: I finally appreciate that "women's health" means different things at different times. For this year's National Women's Health Week, we're focusing on what steps women can take at different ages and stages to live a healthier life. And now that I am older, I'd like to share some of my thoughts on things I wish someone had told me when I was younger. In my 20s Fall in love with working out. Sometimes when you're young, you think you don't need to exercise. You can run, jum...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Act F.A.S.T. and Save a Life!
Yes, I'm getting older! My knees hurt for no reason at times and my joints pop and crack like an old house settling. Yet I continue to push through by working out regularly, eating healthy, and hoping to slow down Father Time and ignore my athletic mortality. Many of my physician colleagues admit to neglecting their health due to the busy lives they lead, but I try my best to practice what I preach. Stressing the importance of healthy eating, being physically active, taking medication as prescribed and regular follow ups with a physician is more than just a reflex recommendation to my patients. It is an integral part of my...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Guy Who Wanted To Be A Real-Life Hulk Almost Had To Have Arms Amputated
A bodybuilder who wanted to resemble The Incredible Hulk is instead feeling green, after the synthetic muscle injections he used caused myriad health problems and nearly led to the amputation of his arms. Romario dos Santos Alves, a 25-year-old from Caldas Novas, Brazil, told Barcroft Media he started injecting his muscles with the mixture of oil and alcohol three years ago in an attempt to beef up his physique. But once he started, he found it difficult to stop. After repeated injections left him sporting 25-inch biceps -- and in the hospital -- Alves says he realized he had to kick the habit for good. Doctors informed ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rethinking Retirement in the 21st Century
Conclusion In the 21st century, many seniors are not retiring from something. Instead, retirement is an opportunity for reinventing, reimagining and reconnecting to one's self, family, friends and community. Robert Browning once wrote, "Grow old along with me! The best is yet to be." By investing in your physical, mental and financial health today, you can help ensure that your best years are just ahead. Rear Admiral Susan Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.A. (ret.) is the Public Health Editor of The Huffington Post. She is a Senior Fellow in Health Policy at New America and a Clinical Professor at Tufts and Georgetown University Sc...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

9 Science-Backed Reasons Why You Should Go to Bed Early
Show of hands if you've ever stayed up way too late texting with friends, catching up on TV shows, or scrolling aimlessly through Pinterest or Reddit. Yep, plenty of us are guilty as charged -- and as a result, we end up feeling exhausted in the morning. That most Americans are falling short on getting the recommended eight hours of sleep per night is nothing new. Clearly though, not everyone who fails to log enough shut eye actually has trouble sleeping. Plenty of us are just staying up too late or putting off bedtime in favor of other activities. But over time, staying awake into the wee hours can come with a hefty cos...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 Key Nutrients For Better Brainpower
By Nancy Christie When it comes to what we eat, we usually worry more about our waistlines than our wisdom. But a diet that contains a wide assortment of healthy foods and nutrients doesn’t just benefit your body; it may protect your brain from cognitive decline as you age. In order to defend against a variety of age-related conditions that can impair your memory and the general functioning of your brain, a good first step is to concentrate on incorporating three nutrients into your diet: omega-3 fatty acids, flavonoids and vitamin E. 1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Brain Volume For your memory to function smoothly, your br...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Steps To Finding Your True Purpose
SPECIAL FROM Grandparents.com With average life expectancy now approaching 80, Americans can look forward to spending almost two decades enjoying retirement. That free time can seem heavenly at first—until the days stretch on. "[After] the honeymoon stage comes the disenchantment stage," says Dr. Sara Yogev, psychologist and author of "A Couple's Guide to Happy Retirement." "People feel like everything is purposeless. They can get depressed, and we would like to avoid that stage." Discovering your purpose—your driving force—is a proven way of escaping that emptiness. "From what we know from research, those that hav...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Madison Small And The Threat Of Bacterial Meningitis
Eighteen-year old high school student Madison Small of Ashburn, Virginia is dead after a swift and unexpected bacterial infection, reported ABC News. Small, an accomplished softball player, complained of a headache on the evening of Monday, Apr. 6 and was taken to the hospital, according to local news station WJLA in the video above. She died the next morning. On April 13, health investigators announced that she had died of bacterial meningitis, but said that her case was not part of a wider outbreak in the community. Bacterial meningitis is rare but severe. The infection, which can be caused by several different strai...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eulogy For My Father
I thought I would get used to it. Maybe feel some callousness to it. Walking into the building and being directed to the viewing hall. Walking to the front of the room and seeing a loved one lying in a casket. I have seen a cousin, grandparents, uncles and friends within the last five years or so pass away. These past few months I have had to come to grips that I will again face death. My dad is dying! Twenty-four years ago my father suffered a near fatal stroke. The years following have been dealt with his heath declining and new issues he's faced including COPD and congestive heart failure. He has had a portable defibr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Obamacare Has Already Transformed How We Diagnose Diabetes
President Obama may be able add another feather to his cap, according to a study of newly diagnosed diabetes patients published in Diabetes Care this week. The study found a 23 percent increase in newly diagnosed diabetes patients in the 26 states (and the District of Columbia) that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act last year. In the 24 states that did not expand Medicaid, the increase in newly diagnosed diabetes patients was only 0.4 percent. “Clearly, expanding Medicaid has allowed those 26 states that did so to identify a large number of people who previously did not know they were living with diabetes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Diet Could Cut Your Risk Of Alzheimer's By Up To 50 Percent
What if there was a preventative measure that could slash your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease by up to half? Some nutritionists may have found it, in the form of a Mediterranean-based diet that's high in nutrients and low in sugar and unhealthy fats. The brain-healthy (and fittingly named) MIND diet -- which stands for "Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay" -- is effective even if it is not followed rigorously, according to a new study from Rush University. Researchers found that people who followed the diet closely had a 53 percent lower chance of developing Alzheimer's, and those who onl...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What 'Empire' Got Right (And Wrong) About Music Therapy
Perhaps one of the most stirring and sympathetic characters in Fox’s hit show “Empire" is Andre, who suffers from Bipolar disorder. In case you’ve been living under a rock for the past three months and haven’t watched the hottest TV show of 2015, here’s a quick recap of Andre’s situation: the oldest son of a music conglomerate CEO vies for power over the company he helped build, but between all the pressure (and betrayal, and violence, and lack of love and support), as well as his attempts to keep a lid on his emotions, Andre eventually flushes his meds down the toilet, precipitating a mental breakdown and entr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here to Stay -- Living With Sickle Cell Disease
My name is Noah Alexander Williams and I am living with sickle cell anemia disease. Sickle cell isn't really a widely talked-about disease but it's so real and epic that it should be. Sickle cell anemia disease is a grasping chronic sickness that doesn't let go. Unfortunately I have it and have had it since I was born. I don't know life without sickle cell disease and therefore I don't know life without pain -- the daily aches, the crucial crises that come out of nowhere. Sickle cell is never predictable. Of course this disease has impacted my life beyond words. I've learned to cope with it. Just to be clear, sickle cell...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The One Food Nutritionists Eat Every Single Day
By Sarah-Jane Bedwell, SELF While registered dietitians certainly recommend balance, variety, and moderation to ensure you get all the necessary nutrients that you need, they have "personal superfoods" that they reach for on a regular basis for both nutrition and convenience purposes. From turmeric smoothies to chocolate and peanut butter combos, dietitians around the country share the foods they eat every single day. Citrus Fruit I eat some form of vitamin C and potassium packed citrus each day because the delightfully refreshing flavors are a great reminder that good nutrition should taste great! It might be a 6 ounce...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

11 Reasons Your Crazy Cat Obsession Makes You Happier And Healthier
Feline fans, rejoice: Your cat isn't just a cute and cuddly ball of fluff -- he's also incredibly good for your health. Even pet owners who prefer puppies can't deny the major benefits that come along with caring for a furry friend of either species. Science shows that pets can help prevent allergies in kids, ward off respiratory infections, improve your mood and even boost self-esteem. Whether you're a crazy cat lady or a dude ready to publicly proclaim your obsession with your feline friend, get ready to celebrate the many pros of being a proud cat owner -- all negative stereotypes aside. Here are 11 reasons we should...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Aspirin a Day: Is the Benefit Worth the Risk?
Studies have shown that aspirin, the age old remedy for pain and fever, also thins the blood. Because of this property, it can also help to lower the chances of a heart attack or a stroke caused by a blood clot in the brain. And, although research has found that it only works in certain people (specifically, those with a history of heart attack or stroke) many Americans are inappropriately taking daily, low doses of aspirin as a preventative measure. In fact, researchers have found that about 12 percent of the of nearly 69,000 U.S. adults taking aspirin on a long-term basis should not have received the prescription in the ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Couples Over 50 Are More Likely To Divorce When The Wife Gets Sick, Study Suggests
Couples vow on their wedding days to love one another in sickness and in health, but apparently, that's not a promise they always keep. A new study published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior has found that when a wife gets sick, marriages are more likely to end in divorce than "till death do us part." Researchers at Iowa State University looked at 2,701 couples over the age of 50 from the Health and Retirement Study, conducted between 1992 and 2010. They wanted to see if a diagnosis of cancer, heart problems, lung disease and/or stroke could potentially affect marital outcomes. And it did, but only for women: ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Yoga Was My Catalyst
I was terrified the first time I walked into a hot yoga studio. The stifling heat got my heart pumping before the class began. The room was packed and I squeezed my 6'4" frame onto a small section of the floor. My yoga mat felt like an island I was hoping to be rescued from. The class started, and the instructions from the teacher might as well have been in a foreign language. I found some advanced yogis to mimic and surprised myself with flexibility I wasn't expecting. I stretched muscles I hadn't used in years and felt a cleansing detox. Water had never tasted so good. Upon leaving the studio I felt a rush of endorphins ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Ways Your Sleep Affects What You Eat
Great power lies in a solid night's sleep. Logging those 7-9 hours of shut-eye daily helps us stay mentally sharp, repair damage done to our bodies during the day, reduce stress and even achieve more success in life. But what happens when you don't give your body the rest it needs? Once a healthy sleep routine falls apart, the rest of the body seems to follow suit. Research has linked too little sleep to a decrease in productivity, weaker immune system, and increased risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer. It even affects the ways we eat -- in major ways and not for the better. Here are five ways sleep deprivation cou...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Life With a TBI: March Is National Brain Injury Awareness Month
I find it strangely interesting that this time last year, as I was enduring the beginning of my life with a TBI, I had no idea that March was National Brain Injury Awareness Month. This year I feel compelled to shout it from the rooftops (or the computer screen)! Over the next few weeks, I intend to share with you stories and journeys of those living with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or caring for a loved one who is recovering from one. My hope is to educate those who aren't familiar with TBI, and to help other TBI-ers understand that they are not alone, and that their symptoms are not just "in their head" (pun intended)...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why The Science Behind Anti-Depressants May Be Completely 'Backwards'
Anti-depressants are the most commonly-prescribed medication in the U.S., with one in 10 Americans currently taking pills like Zoloft and Lexapro to treat depression. But these pharmaceuticals are only fully effective roughly 30 percent of the time, and often come with troublesome side effects. In a controversial new paper published in the journal Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, psychologist Paul Andrews of McMaster University in Ontario argues that this failure of medication may be based in a misunderstanding of the underlying chemistry related to depression. Andrews surveyed 50 years' worth of research supporti...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Science Behind Anti-Depressants May Be Completely 'Backwards'
Anti-depressants are the most commonly-prescribed medication in the U.S., with one in 10 Americans currently taking pills like Zoloft and Lexapro to treat depression. But these pharmaceuticals are only effective less than 30 percent of the time, and often come with troublesome side effects. In a controversial new paper published in the journal Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, psychologist Paul Andrews of McMaster University in Ontario argues that this failure of medication may be based in a misunderstanding of the underlying chemistry related to depression. Andrews surveyed 50 years' worth of research supporting t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news