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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post

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Total 340 results found since Jan 2013.

Americans Are Still Eating Too Much Salt
According to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Americans are still eating too much salt. The CDC says that 9 in 10 Americans, or 90 percent, consume more sodium than the recommended amount. In the Western diet, most of the sodium we consume comes from the salt. This news is alarming because as everyone should know by now, too much salt in our diets raises our risk for heart disease and leads to potentially life-threatening conditions including high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke. The report says that more than 90 percent of children and 89 percent of adults in the United State...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weird Ways to Cope With Winter
Winter can be a cruel time for many. With so many holidays, it's one of the busiest and most enjoyable times of the year, but the cold weather and long nights can lead to all kinds of mental and physical health issues. That's why it's important to pay extra attention to your health over winter -- after all, you wouldn't want anything spoiling the fun. Outside of the obvious tips like wrapping up warm and wearing sensible shoes, there are some lesser known winter health hacks that can really make the difference. Though it's easy to oversleep in winter, it isn't recommended. Image by Only Sequel. Try Not to Oversleep With s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Terrified Should We Be?
After every terrorist attack we go through a period of overwhelming fear that we will individually be the target of terrorism. Recently a man told me that he will avoid going to crowded areas of the city because he fears being killed by a terrorist. A woman fears flying because she fears the plane will be blown up by a terrorist. Years ago, after 9/11, a woman told me that she feared "Arab-looking men" in the subway. And, after 9/11, years ago, a family moved to Colorado from New York City because of their fear of terrorism. Fear pervaded the lives of many people and, once again, after the attack in San Bernardino, Califor...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Depression in the Elderly: A Common Condition That's Often Overlooked
When Suzette Santos, RN, a behavioral health nurse with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY), was assigned to the case of Grace*, an 89-year-old resident of Nassau County on Long Island, she had some idea what to expect. Suzette had cared for Grace a year earlier, as the elderly woman struggled to cope with depression brought on by the recent loss of her husband and lifelong partner. When Suzette reconnected with her patient this time, she could immediately see that Grace's depression had gotten worse. "She had lost a lot of weight -- about 20 pounds," Suzette recalls. "She had no interest in cooking or eating, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Introducing Sleep + Wellness
First, the bad news. We're in the middle of a sleep crisis. According to a recent Gallup poll, 40 percent of all American adults are sleep-deprived. And the problem runs deep: the idea of sleep as time wasted not only compromises our health and our decision-making, it also undermines our relationships, our work lives, our performance and our decision-making. Now, the good news. We're also in the midst of a sleep revolution, finding ourselves in a golden age of sleep science, with new findings coming out practically every day testifying to sleep's benefits. Scientists are confirming what our ancestors knew instinctively: t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An MMA Fighter Just Died Because He Tried To Lose Too Much Weight
Chinese mixed martial arts fighter Yang Jian Bing died on Friday at the age of 21 due to heart failure resulting from an attempt to cut weight for an upcoming bout. Bing was scheduled to compete in Friday's ONE Championship 35 in Manila, Philippines, but the the organization announced on Thursday that the match was canceled due to Bing suffering from severe dehydration and a suspected heat stroke. Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and loved ones of #ONE Flyweight Yang Jian Bing. #RIP pic.twitter.com/lhj42ceseu— ONE Championship (@ONEFCMMA) December 11, 2015 Extreme weight-cutting can be common i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Power of Compassion: A Holiday Gift
There was nothing soft about my father. He was old-school strict and often brutally harsh. Seeking comfort from him was like trying to buy milk at a hardware store. To his credit, he was an excellent provider. But a lousy Dad. The truth is I didn't know my father. No one did. He was an enigmatic man with a brick wall around him so high you could never look in. The only thing predictable about him was his unpredictability. His mercurial moods were as reliable as a volatile stock market. My father was a Greek immigrant who came to the U.S. in the early 1950s seeking the American dream. He left his home village in Greece a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

37 Art Therapy Techniques For De-Stressing During The Holidays
The holidays are finally here, bringing an onslaught of family, food and, for many of us, stress on stress. Whether you're dreading endless conversations with your great aunt Judith or getting anxious over the prospect of impending New Year's resolutions, may we humbly suggest you let your creative side serve as a sort of internal massage. Art therapy is a form of therapy predicated on the belief that artistic expression has the power to help us in healing, in self-esteem or simply in chilling out. It's unique in that most other forms of therapy rely on language as the foremost mode of communication, whereas art requi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Gratitude Can Benefit Your Physical Health All Year Long
Now that we're officially in the holiday season, generosity and gratitude reign supreme. We're altruistic because we're motivated at this time of year to support others who are less fortunate, and we express thanks for those who have extended similar kindness to us. And honestly, why wouldn't we want to tap into this sort of holiday spirit? Both generosity and gratitude have an incredible influence on our emotional health. When we practice them, we're happier, more optimistic and have a lower risk for depression and anxiety. New research also shows that gift giving reflects how we feel about others and could give more...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Self-Advocacy
On August 18, 2008 I went up to the office to do a load of xeroxing, throwing my bag in the back seat of the car. When I got to school, however, something was wrong. Though early in the am, it was like I was drunk, with walking wobbly and difficult. Being a compulsive, I idiotically worked for half an hour, holding on to the copying machine to steady myself. Then I drove home (second stupid act), called the health help line, where they told me to get to the ER. And don't drive! Once there, they figured I had had a stroke and put me on coumadin, a powerful blood thinner. Three days later, in the evening, a nurse wrote on my...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Stigma Ends Now
Did you smoke? That is often one of the first responses patients hear when they tell people about their lung cancer diagnosis. For decades lung cancer has been singled out as THE smoker's disease, despite evidence that over 30 other deadly diseases are directly linked to tobacco consumption. In fact, a recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that breast cancer, prostate cancer, kidney failure and diabetes are among those smoking-related diseases. This connection between tobacco and serious illnesses other than lung cancer has been known for quite a while. The U.S. surgeon general lists smoking ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Cholesterol Vaccine Shows Promise, But Don't Eat Extra Bacon Just Yet
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Pets Help You Live Longer and Happier?
By John Swartzberg How dogs and cats may help your heart. Back when she was younger and friskier, I used to bring my golden retriever with me to the UC Berkeley campus for some of my lectures. She'd plop her furry frame down next to me while I was speaking and flash her classic "golden smile" at the hall full of students. There's nothing scientific to this, of course, but I'm quite certain that everyone in my class was much more happy when she was around than when I came to class without her. (Sometimes I think they would have preferred that she ran the class!) Pets make people happy. It's hard to argue with this, althoug...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why You Should Check Your Blood Pressure In The Morning
ORLANDO, Fla. — People who have high blood pressure are often advised to monitor their blood pressure at home, and now, a new study suggests that blood pressure measured in the morning may be a better predictor of stroke risk than blood pressure measured in the evening. In the study, researchers looked at data from people in Japan and found that, when measured in the morning, higher blood pressure was related to an increased risk of stroke. When measured in the evening, however, higher blood pressure was not as closely related to people's stroke risk. Blood pressure has a tendency to surge in the morning, a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Disrupting Today's Healthcare System
This week in San Diego, Singularity University is holding its Exponential Medicine Conference, a look at how technologists are redesigning and rebuilding today's broken healthcare system. Healthcare today is reactive, retrospective, bureaucratic and expensive. It's sick care, not healthcare. This blog is about why the $3 trillion healthcare system is broken and how we are going to fix it. First, the Bad News: Doctors spend $210 billion per year on procedures that aren’t based on patient need, but fear of liability. Americans spend, on average, $8,915 per person on healthcare – more than any other count...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Major Study Paints Picture Of America's Health System -- And It's Not Pretty
  So you assume Americans are the healthiest people in the free world? Not so fast, Charlie. The annual OECD Health at a Glance report for 2015 found:   1. The U.S. still leads in per capita health spending. Although U.S. health-spending growth has slowed down in recent years, it was still 2.5 times greater than the OECD average in 2013. The United States spends about $8,713 per person, by far the most of any country in the world. Other countries, including Turkey and India, spend less than $1,000 on health care per person annually.   2. Life expectancy in the U.S. is lower than in most other OECD ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What It's Like When Your Mother Struggles With Major Anxiety
This article originally appeared on YourTango. More from YourTango: 5 Ways I Stay Happily Married To A Man With Chronic Anxiety 10 Things Your Friend Dealing With Anxiety Wants You To Know 10 Uplifting Quotes That Will Get You Through The Day A Guide To The BEST Birth Control For Every Type Of Woman Out There 7 Ways To Keep Their Passive-Aggression From Driving You Nuts Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lack Of Sleep (Or Too Much Of It) Raises Diabetes Risk For Older Women
Middle-aged and older women who regularly get less than six hours sleep a night are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to new research just published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Assn. for the Study of Diabetes. But the news gets worse: Those who do manage to add two hours a night to their sleep also increase their risk of developing diabetes. So to recap: With damned if you do, damned if you don't results, the connection between sleep patterns and the risk of developing adult diabetes has been reinforced by this study of almost 60,000 women aged 55 to 83. The study out of Harvard T.H. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep Apnea Tied To Gout Risk And Flare-Ups
(Reuters Health) - Sleep apnea may increase the risk of developing gout and experiencing flare-ups, according to a new study. The intense pain and swelling of a joint, often a big toe, that marks gout is caused by the deposition of uric acid crystals in joints and tissues. Sleep apnea, the study team notes, causes periods of oxygen deprivation during the night when people stop breathing, which triggers overproduction of uric acid in the bloodstream. But little was known about the relationship between the two conditions, the study team writes in Arthritis and Rheumatology.  In 2007-2008, almost six percent of men and t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Must-Do Health Checks For Women Over 50
This article first appeared on the Golden Girls Network blog. Earlier on Huff/Post50: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Scary Ways Your Office Job Is Killing You
This article originally appeared on YourTango. More from YourTango: Why I'm Giving Up My Cushy Job To Travel The World In An RV 7 Ways To Keep Their Passive-Aggression From Driving You Nuts 10 Uplifting Quotes That Will Get You Through The Day 5 Things You MUST Try Before Turning To Mood-Boosting Medicines Quotes To Share With Your Long-Distance Lover Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Sleep Technologies: How Much Snore for the Dollar?
Do you want better sleep? Of course you do. You know how bad it is to miss out on sleep, so it can feel like insult added to injury to read yet another newfound, devastating consequence of insufficient sleep: heart disease, heart attack, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, mental impairment, etc. And the list is expanding almost daily as researchers learn more. There are "easy" actions that may aid with sleep. Relaxation activities like meditation or chamomile tea are useful for some. Setting and sticking to a waking and sleeping schedule, creating a bedroom retreat, and making a list of worries before turning in can he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8 Ways Sleep Can Help (or Hinder) Your Work Performance
Americans have a sleep problem, and that means we have a work problem. We're getting less and less sleep (especially on work nights), to the point that the CDC has declared sleep deprivation a public health epidemic. Entrepreneurs are particularly susceptible to sleep deprivation given the pressures and massive workloads that are common for business owners of all stripes. But insufficient sleep will cost you in just about every way -- physically, mentally, financially, and on the job. In contrast, high-quality sleep can up your game and give you a competitive edge over the caffeine-addicted zombies wandering the office ha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Your Blood Type Means For Your Health
ImageContent(5627c16ae4b08589ef4a227d,5627c0981400006f003c8c87,Image,HectorAssetUrl(5627c0981400006f003c8c87,Some(crop_29_110_3211_2335),Some(jpeg)),AlexRaths via Getty Images,) EmbedContent(5627c16ae4b08589ef4a227e,SPECIAL FROM ,Embed,html,Some({})) Quick: What’s your blood type? If you’re scratching your head, you may be missing out on an important health clue. A spate of recent research suggests that your blood type—whether A, B, AB, or O—may influence your risk for a variety of health conditions, from cardiac disease to cancer.   The research is still early and scientists aren’t yet s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 Ways to Get Maximum Stress Relief During Work Breaks
This article first appeared on Lantern's blog, which shares expert advice and research on strengthening emotional well-being. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ICYMI: Schizophrenia Treatment In America And Toddlers With Guns
ICYMI Health features what we're reading this week. This week, we read about how society struggles to provide care for mentally ill patients, both in the U.S. and abroad. First we spend time with an investigation by our colleagues at HuffPost Highline, and learned about how early intervention programs can be life-changing treatments for patients with schizophrenia -- and why the U.S. isn't using them. We were also transfixed by a video from West Africa, where treatments for major mental illnesses are limited. While mentally ill people in the U.S. frequently land in prison, the last stop for people with ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lessons Learned From Trends in Insufficient Sleep Across the United States
This article originally appeared on the Amerisleep blog. Rosie Osmun is the Creative Content Manager at Amerisleep, a progressive memory foam mattress brand focused on eco-friendly sleep solutions. Rosie writes more posts on the Amerisleep blog about the science of sleep, eco-friendly living, leading a healthy lifestyle and more. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What I Learned From Not Finishing My First Triathlon
I registered for the Bethany Beach Triathlon to build endurance as part of my marathon training. And I wanted to practice approaching and overcoming fear. Drowning in the ocean? How about nightmarish images of my skeleton crumbling to the ground as I attempt to run 26 miles? It was at the beach and sounded like fun. My only goal was to finish. Except I didn't. I struggled to find my breath within moments of entering the ocean. I was too afraid to put my head underwater because I was sure I would drown. No amount of training in the pool prepared me for the force of the waves and the effort it took to fill my lungs with air...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Man Who Grew Eyes
The train line from mainland Kobe is a marvel of urban transportation. Opened in 1981, Japan’s first driverless, fully automated train pulls out of Sannomiya station, guided smoothly along elevated tracks that stand precariously over the bustling city streets below, across the bay to the Port Island. The island, and much of the city, was razed to the ground in the Great Hanshin Earthquake of 1995 – which killed more than 5,000 people and destroyed more than 100,000 of Kobe’s buildings – and built anew in subsequent years. As the train proceeds, the landscape fills with skyscrapers. The Rokkō mounta...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Steps To Help You Genuinely Forgive
The boss makes a condescending comment. A jerk in a big SUV cuts you off. A best friend steals your girlfriend. A waitress ignores you. A coworker takes credit for your work. Your pulse picks up. Your mind races with progressively more unkind thoughts. You have been mistreated. You relive the situation over and over and cannot think of much else. You begin to think up ways to "get even." Accepting Imperfection We humans are, all in all, a pretty good lot. We can however, whether intentionally or not, get under each other's skin ... to offend and injure and even kill. We make mistakes ... both small ones and whoppers, for ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

App Saves Lives By Connecting People With CPR Training To Cardiac Arrest Victims
Some of the most powerful applications of technology involve connecting people to one another at the right time, not in real time. When a good idea is matched with solid implementation, remarkable outcomes can follow. The big idea behind PulsePoint is for local 911 dispatchers to use a smartphone app to alert people trained and certified in CPR that someone nearby is going into cardiac arrest. In that kind of emergency situation, a more rapid response can be the difference between life, death or disability. A citizen trained in CPR arriving and treating a victim before medical professionals ar...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lupus, Selena Gomez's Autoimmune Disease, Explained
In an interview with Billboard magazine this week, Selena Gomez confirmed she's been struggling with an autoimmune disease that forced her to take a step back from her work and cancel tours in 2013 and 2014. "I was diagnosed with lupus, and I’ve been through chemotherapy," she told Billboard. "That’s what my break was really about. I could’ve had a stroke." What is lupus? Similar to other autoimmune diseases, lupus causes the body's immune system to attack its own tissue and organs.  Lupus can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms -- including joint pain, chronic fati...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Design Your Healthy and Happy Life With 3 Quick Makeovers: Small Steps Equal a Big Impact
Design your healthy and happy life with these super quick makeover tips that will have you wanting more. A healthy and happy life is about living blissfully, with passion and purpose, not just about the absence of disease. The great news is that we can design our own healthy lifestyle plan just like interior designers create beautiful spaces; we can design it no matter where we are in your own health journey; dealing with an illness, or recovering from an injury. What's even better news is that we don't need to do a complete overhaul. Who doesn't love a quick makeover? Sometimes, all it takes is new throw pillows or a bold...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Pet Affection Improve Heart Health?
by Mimi O' Connor An energetic-looking young woman came bouncing down the aisle of the airplane so quickly that I barely had time to read the message on her T-shirt before she plopped down in the seat next to me. It read in bold letters "I LOVE ANIMALS," and underneath in smaller italics, "humans not so much." Being an animal lover myself, her shirt made me smile. I felt compelled to ask her about it. She told me that she was a veterinary medicine student and has cared for an expansive menagerie of critters since she was a little girl. My exposure to animals was modest by comparison. I've lived with and loved just two dogs...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Keys To A Happy, Healthy Brain
Why are some people sharp as a tack at 95 years old, while others begin struggling with mental clarity in their 50s? A lot of it has to do with genetics, but certain lifestyle factors also play an important role in how our brain ages. So while you can't control your genes, you can take advantage of the latest science to keep your grey cells strong: Get your olive oil Foods high in sugar, unhealthy fats and processed foods -- i.e., the typical American diet -- can wreak havoc on your brain over time. Studies have shown that excess sugar consumption can impair learning and memory, and increase your vulnerability to neurod...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Invisible Illness or Chronic Illness? What's the Difference?
Why do we say we have an "invisible illness"? Is is because we feel invisible to people? Years ago the term "invisible illness" was rarely used. Before social media the opportunity to talk about your disease was relegated to a local support group and perhaps a caring friend or two. Illness was something you spoke to your doctor about... and that was all. I became an online illness advocate when I built my first website for those with chronic illness in 1996. As the Internet has evolved from news groups to social media, much has changed. But I have seen one continual thread: people are eager to share about their illness exp...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Low Can You Go?
Though Chubby Checker recorded these lyrics to Limbo Rock in 1962, the popular catchphrase still holds true today--especially when it comes to your blood pressure. Ever since 1967, we've been aiming to go low. That is the year the first Veterans Administration Cooperative Trial was published, which confirmed that treatment of patients with high blood pressure resulted in fewer strokes, deaths and cardiovascular complications. Before this landmark study, high blood pressure was not recognized as a disease requiring treatment. There were even physicians who felt that high blood pressure was a phenomenon of aging and that hi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

9 Healthy Reasons To Indulge Your Coffee Cravings
There's no need to feel guilty about your morning cup o’ joe. On the contrary: People who drink four or more cups of coffee a day have up to a 20 percent lower risk of melanoma than those who sip the dark stuff less often, according to a 2015 study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. But this study is hardly the first one touting good news for java junkies. "Coffee is incredibly rich in antioxidants, which are responsible for many of its health benefits," says Joy Bauer, RD, nutrition and health expert for Everyday Health and The Today Show. And studies show that its caffeine content may also play a prot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Old Age to Pollution, Science Keeps Changing How We Understand Illness
Just a generation ago, heart disease and other chronic diseases like dementia were felt to be an inevitable consequence of getting old. Since the 1960s, however, we have learned that only a small percentage of chronic diseases (for heart disease perhaps 25%) are explained due to genetic origins. The majority of chronic illness are determined by our lifestyle choices. Whether we smoke, sit a lot, eat fried and processed foods, sleep poorly, and pack on the pounds may all trump even favorable genes to accelerate chronic diseases. In fact, the risk of heart attack is 85% lower in persons that take simple and inexpensive measu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

South Carolina Is FED UP
When asked to speak for a group of third and fourth graders about making "healthy choices," I picked the topic that most children have in common ... sugar! I began our discussion with one simple question. "If your parents came into the room and saw you eating out of the sugar bowl, what would they say?" One young man stated it best. "Are you crazy? Put that spoon down!" "Why would your parents say that?" I asked. Another little girl could barely contain herself. Waving her hand furiously she blurted out, "Because all that sugar is bad for you!" Out of the mouths of babes. When I talk to children, teens or adults,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Your Prescription a Hall Pass or Lottery Ticket?
As much as I love learning, I did not always love school. We moved a lot, and I was too shy to do well as the new kid. At a new high school during my freshmen year, I discovered the joys of the hall pass. Being handed one gave me a feeling of freedom. With it, I was safe to evade the pressures of the classroom and wander the halls aimlessly. If a teacher stopped me to see if I should be in class, all I had to do was show my hall pass, and I'd be on my way. I think of a hall pass as something that is assured to protect you. Let's say a hall pass works at least 8 out of 10 times. There are hall passes, and then, there are l...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Most Beautiful Dance I Ever Enjoyed With My Husband
This past weekend my husband, Dan danced at our friend's daughter's wedding. Well, if you consider swaying from side to side dancing, then it qualifies. While it may not seem so remarkable, the fact that Dan wiggled on a dance floor is amazing and wonderful! It was just five years ago that his life took a cruel turn and he suffered a devastating stroke. He couldn't walk, talk or eat. He had a feeding tube in his stomach, and we were told he was "gravely" ill. The stroke had affected his brain stem where bodily functions were regulated, paralyzed the optic nerve and traveled beyond. He received tPA -- tissue plasminogen ac...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Is The Number One Health Problem Soldiers Face
What's the most wide-spread health issue plaguing members of the military? While post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injuries and depression are critical issues that drum up worthy media attention, the answer is much more ordinary: sleep problems. Sleep disorders are "the absolute number one military disorder when people come back from deployments," Lt. Col. Kate E. Van Arman, medical director at Fort Drum's Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic, told attendees at a defense centers health conference on Wednesday. "Among TBI soldiers, it is the number two problem after headaches." Van Arman went on to explain that ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep Problems May Hint At Future Heart Disease Risk
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Adults who get too much or too little sleep may have the beginnings of “hardening" of the arteries, which can be an early sign of heart disease, according to a new study. “Many people, up to one third or one fourth of the general population, suffer from inadequate sleep – either insufficient duration of sleep or poor quality of sleep,” said co-lead author Dr. Chan-Won Kim of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital of Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea. Several studies have linked inadequate sleep with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, bu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 Reasons Every Weekend Should Be A Long Weekend
Three-day weekends are what summer is all about. We need those extra hours for traveling farther, grilling longer and taking in more sunsets. But did you know that the time-honored tradition is also good for your health? Here's your cheat sheet for convincing your boss to extend the goodness of the three-day weekend all year long: 1. Planning short vacations throughout the year can preserve employee well-being. Taking short vacations could be the key to workplace happiness, especially if you take them regularly. Employees who took four- to five-day vacations experienced health and well-being improvements, according to a sm...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Ways to Avoid Death Via the Rat Race
In case you haven't figured it out, the rat race is real, and it can be very dangerous to your health and soul. Whether you work for someone or own a small business and work for multiple clients, chances are you have felt the weight of the rat race. We live in a 24/7 world with access to our work at all moments of day. Unfortunately, the first thing that many of us do in the morning is check our phones and enter a never ending stream of data. In Japan, death by overwork is a very real problem. According to Economy Watch, thousands of workers die each year after working too much work, and the government is stepping in to c...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Quality Measure Seeks to Optimize Cardiovascular Care For African Americans
In recent months, the debate on race and policing in this country has ignited passions and raised important questions. But while headlines have highlighted instances of excessive force by police and the discriminatory treatment of African Americans, the conversation hasn't yet made the logical leap to a discussion around unequal access to care. It is widely accepted in medical literature that African Americans, Hispanics, and the poor are receiving substandard health care. By way of example, the treatment of heart disease should not be a matter of race; it should be a matter of science and medicine. Today, there are thous...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are We Working Ourselves to Death?
If you are an executive, manager, emergency medicine physician (EMP), Silicon Valley employee or struggling law associate, you and many like you are probably working more than 60 hours a week. According to a survey published in the Harvard Business Review a few years ago, you may be working an average of 72 hours a week. Contrast this with the government's desire to limit excessive working hours about 80 years ago when, on June 25, 1938, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLS). This law banned oppressive child labor, set the minimum hourly wage at 25 cents, and the maximum workweek at 44 h...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Panic-Stricken Country
Today I witnessed a truly humbling event. A young man -- about 30, I'll call him Brad -- was experiencing a panic attack. His condition greatly resembled that of a stroke, as he was unable to move his extremities, his face was nearly paralyzed, and he could barely speak or breathe. His friend, I'll call him Alex, another 30-something-year-old guy, brought Brad to the ER. It took a few medics to get Brad into a wheelchair and inside due to his inability to move most of his body. As I watched the events unfold, I was touched by Alex's gestures. After registering Brad, Alex found a box of Kleenex and pulled out a handful of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 28, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news