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Tourette's Syndrome: More Than Meets The Ears
What do you know about Tourette's syndrome? That it causes involuntary swearing? While this is true in some cases, there is so much more to the neurological condition than most people realize. In fact, uncontrollable swearing or yelling of socially unacceptable phrases - known as coprolalia - only occurs in around 10 to 15 percent of individuals with Tourette's syndrome (TS). Despite affecting relatively few people with TS, coprolalia is perceived as one of the main symptoms of the condition. It is this misconception, among a number of others, that has fueled a stereotype of people with TS. "The reality is that Toure...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women With Migraines Are More Prone To This Scary Health Condition
This study provides really good quality evidence that migraine in women is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Rebecca Burch, an instructor in the department of neurology at Harvard Medical School in Boston, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study, but was not involved in the research. Migraines have a fairly small effect on cardiovascular risk compared with other known risk factors that have a much larger influence on heart disease, such as smoking, high blood pressure or high cholesterol, Burch said. However, because migraines are relatively common, affecting an estimated 1 in 4 American women, this...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why I'm Vowing To Use All Of My Vacation Days This Year
I have a confession to make: I am the opposite of "wanderlust." Not in the sense that I refuse to go out on a Friday night or grab dinner after work, but that I only do those things. I rarely venture beyond the city where I live. I stick to my turf. I like my routine. While I want to get out of town and explore a place unknown, I feel like I'm throwing all my responsibilities to the wind when I'm away. To compensate, I work remotely when I leave the city to visit family. I arrange most of my pleasurable trips on the weekends. I even figure out ways to make up time missed for doctors' appointments. The w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-Salt Diet Assaulted
Photo by Kai Schreiber From a public health perspective, salt shakers have been branded the equivalent of an ash tray, an instrument of ill health. Achtung baby. But a large study published recently in The Lancet, a major British medical journal, is shaking things up. Researchers followed 133,000 people for more than four years, monitoring their salt intake and whether any of the following bad things happened to them: heart attack, heart failure, stroke, or death. Roughly half the group had already been diagnosed with hypertension, and excess salt intake has long been thought to be a key driver in the physiology that cau...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Life is Simple: Eat, Sleep, Swim, Repeat
A glass of crisp white and a rocket salad. And the potato mash, please. I haven't met a potato I didn't like. Famished each afternoon of my recent magical mermaid holiday, I sat down with wet salty hair, ordered and devoured. Swimming burns so much energy. I watched the beach full of swimmers and surfers. This is one wave of heaven, for me I thought, as I scribed notes on my pile of 4 X 6 cards. Noting and documenting my time in Oz waters, while watching it. I am lifted up this day. I met Mark and I get it. The magnificent pull of the sea. The perfect simple elegant solution to all that troubles us. Move in the water. Per ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Be Aware and Beware: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Is an Equal Opportunity Disease
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, or CFS, is an innocuous name given to a debilitating disease. Its seriousness is better indicated by the term Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), a label preferred by many of its victims. On May 17-18, the Department of Health and Human Services hosted the biannual public meeting of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee by webinar. This was a fitting time for such a meeting, as May is International ME/CFS Awareness Month. The trigger for CFS/ME is not known. The lack of research on the disease means there is no truly effective and widely available therapy that would allow the more serious...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Get Healthy, Get Happy!
by Sarah Montana Let's face it--most of us resolve to start exercising because we want to look good. But the real reason to get active lies within. Exercise increases not only your physical health--it gives your mental and emotional wellbeing a serious boost. In fact, it can be the key to shifting from coping to thriving. Here are our 5 ways to--finally--making exercise a part of your daily life. 1. Challenge Your Thinking For many people, physical fitness is an emotional topic. And where there are big emotions, there are iceberg beliefs. Negative thinking can make the path to fitness feel overwhelming. Fitness-related ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Optimizing Diet: What You Eat Does Matter to Improve Cancer Outcomes
By: Peiying Yang, Ph.D., Lin Lin Shao, senior clinical dietitian, and Lorenzo Cohen, Ph.D., Integrative Medicine Program The American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) has developed The New American Plate to help us reorganize the quantities of food groups on our plate to promote a more whole food, plant-based approach to nutrition. Mounting evidence shows that eating a primarily plant-based diet reduces cancer risk and is recommended for cancer survivors. By consuming more plants, specifically fresh, non-starchy green vegetables, less animal protein and less added sugars, we can decrease our risk of cancer and improve...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise to Extend Your Life
by Phil Hardesty Imagine if there was a pill you could take that was free and would virtually eliminate, or at least minimize most disease processes. It would provide you with energy and strength to live your life beyond what you thought was possible. Everyone would want this pill and if it worked as well as it promised, just think of how healthy our population may be. Of course this "pill" does exist. It's called regular physical activity and exercise. According to the World Health Organization's Global Health Risks data physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death globally only behind high blood pressure, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnancy Is Scary Enough Without Having To Worry That a Catholic Hospital Might Turn You Away
Maybe I'm just more attuned to it these days -- your 30s will do that to you -- but lately it feels like everyone I know has a scary story about pregnancy. After the adorable photographs have been posted, the celebratory texts sent, the welcome-back-to-the-world-of-sushi-and-beer meals eaten, they tell you about the darker parts of the experience. The nightmarishly long labor. The NICU. The miscarriages that sometimes came before. The last thing any of these women should have to worry about -- the last thing anyone who is pregnant, or their family, should have to worry about -- is being denied appropriate medical care be...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Research-Backed Reasons To Do Leg Exercises
There's a reason hardcore fitness geeks call squats the "king of exercises." When done correctly, they're fantastic for your body. Squats -- as well as other weight-bearing moves like lunges -- strengthen your glutes, quads, hamstrings and core. They can also do wonders for your balance and coordination. (Here's a guide to doing a squat properly.) Want even more incentive to up your strength training game? Check out these unexpected reasons to incorporate leg exercises into your workout routine: 1. They're good for your knees It's a myth that doing squats damages your knees. When executed correctly, squats actually streng...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moms Lose Up To 9 Hours Of Sleep Every Week
Here's another reason to take a minute to appreciate everything your mom's sacrificed for you this Mother's Day: Her sleep.  Not that anyone who’s paced the hallway trying to sooth a crying infant needs proof, but several studies have documented that new parents and parents of young children miss out on a whole lot of sleep. Now, a new population-level research in Australian quantified just how much sleep working Aussie parents are missing out on, compared to their colleagues without children. The results of the survey indicated that fathers of young kids are missing out on one to four hours of sleep each w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 Surprising Things That Increase Your Dementia Risk
SPECIAL FROM “As many as five million Americans age 65 and older may have Alzheimer’s Disease, and that number is expected to double for every five-year interval beyond age 65.” — the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke. While Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, it is not the only form. Risk factors for all kinds of dementia include, age, alcohol use, smoking, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension, and genetics. However, researchers have found some startling connections that show other surprising factors that can heighten your risk: Risk Factor #1: Anticho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Obesity in the U.S. and Europe on the Rise: A Comparison
Levels of obesity in adults and children are rising worldwide. The World Health Organization calls the rising level "an epidemic" citing sugary drinks and processed foods as the main culprits, along with an urban sedentary lifestyle. A study published in The Lancet named "Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013" stated obesity issues "were estimated to have caused 3.4 million deaths globally, most of which were from cardiovascular causes. Research indicates that if left unaddressed, the ri...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don't Simply Turn Away
Did you know that there are 35 national health observances that take place during the month of May? To name a few: Hepatitis and Stroke Awareness Month, Mental Health Month, Teen Pregnancy Prevention, National Physical Education and Sport Week, National Bike to School Day and World Autoimmune Awareness Day. There are a total of 213 national health observances throughout the year. Some might ask: "Is of all this necessary?" "Aren't 213 observances a bit of an overkill?" "Why so many?" We often hear these questions because the majority of people don't really understand the hardships, difficulties, and struggles of ot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why ' Work-Life Balance' Talk Might Make Us More Stressed Out
Do you snicker when you hear the term "work-life balance?" As if. That elusive Zen zone can provoke anxiety, especially to those of us whose perfectionism tells us if we try harder, we'll find it. After 55 minutes of trying to force myself to relax in last week's yoga class, I finally found almost 6 full seconds of unfocused focus time before my mind snapped back to the 36 tasks still waiting for me the moment I rolled up my mat. The average attention span of today is 8 seconds, so I was close. A good effort, all things considered. Is "balance" a fallacy? Maybe you get stressed at the mention. The term can take on a shami...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

On The Road Again!
There is nothing in the world that my husband loved more than bike riding. Well, perhaps sitting in the stands and cheering my four sons on during their soccer games. All the things that scared me about bike riding filled him with pleasure -- the speed as he raced down a road or came zooming down a mountain, the wind whipping his face as he pedaled furiously, and the focused exertion needed to climb or descend the mountain and navigate the rocky terrain. For a man who loved to sleep it was these feelings and the exhilaration of the ride that motivated him to get up in the wee hours each Saturday and Sunday. Dan was a world...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Queen Latifah Urges More Americans To ‘Rise Above Heart Failure’
Addressing health issues in America is something that is near and dear to Queen Latifah’s heart. For the second consecutive year, Latifah and her mom, Rita Owens, are teaming up with the American Heart Association’s “Rise Above Heart Failure” initiative to raise awareness about heart failure. As part of the initiative’s “Red Steps Challenge,” Latifah and Owens -- who was diagnosed with congestive heart failure over 10 years ago -- are calling on six million Americans to take six million “red steps” in their favorite pair of red socks in recognition of six mill...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Take Pills Regularly
Dear Dr. C, This might sound odd, but how can I quit forgetting to take my vitamins? I get my blood tested every few months, and my vitamin D is always low. I try to take it three times daily, but I always quit after a few weeks, and I don't know why. I lost 13 pounds on the Adrenal Reset Diet, and I'm almost thriving! Thank you for writing this book, Brooke, New York Hi Brooke, Thanks for the question. You're not alone. We all find ourselves not following through on our best intentions. This is an excellent question that many of our best minds in public health have struggled with for some time. Would you believe that peo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Common Ingredient Is Making You Extremely Bloated
By Lily Puckett for Teen Vogue. Courtesy of CNP Montrose Plus: 2 other freaky health effects. Salt is impossible to avoid, no matter how hard you try. If you've eaten food prepared by someone other than yourself, you've probably eaten more salt than you should; if you've eaten food prepared by yourself, you've probably done it too. The good news is you definitely have to have some salt in your diet -- but probably not as much as you'd wish. The human body needs 200 milligrams of sodium, or about 0.5 gram of salt, a day to function properly, but according to the American Heart Association, the average American consumes 3,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Global Food Challenges: The Decade to Act
This article was originally published with the Medical Journal of Australia. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

White Doctors In Training Believe Some Disturbing Stuff About Black Patients
When it comes to emergency care, you may have a tough time if you're in pain and not a white man.  Previous research has shown that black and Hispanic patients who reported severe pain in the the ER were 22 percent less likely to receive pain medication than white patients who presented with the same complaints. And women suffer similar disparities: A 2008 study found that women wait an average of 16 minutes longer to receive pain relief for acute abdominal pain in the ER than men do. Now a new study is shedding some light on this phenomenon. "We’ve been looking at racial bias and pain perception to tr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Golf and Wellness: Enjoy Your Health in Full Swing
On June 11, 2016, over 3,000 properties in 83 countries will celebrate Global Wellness Day with the objective to touch the hearts and minds of 250 million people. Thousands of wellness activities will be organized, free of charge, by day spas and salons, hotel spas, fitness clubs, yoga/Pilates studios, ballet companies and dance schools, town halls, even golf clubs. Millions of people will be given the opportunity to try new fun and healthy activities, experience new sensations as bodies are pleasantly invited to breathe consciously, stretch to one's heart content, walk the talk, hike to discover new horizons, pack a scrum...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statins for Sleep Apnea?
New details, possible treatment in the link between heart disease and sleep apnea People with obstructive sleep apnea are at significantly increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The relationship between the two conditions is complex, and the mechanisms by which they may trigger or exacerbate one another are not yet well understood. But the fundamental connection between OSA and cardiovascular disease is strong. Studies indicated that obstructive sleep apnea is 2-3 times more prevalent among people with cardiovascular disease than those without. Research shows that the mortality rate for cardiovascular disease is hig...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Oversimplification of Cholesterol Testing Can Be Deadly
Early every year, countless Americans embark on a new fitness regime. They go for a physical and maybe for a blood test to measure cholesterol levels. After a clean bill of health, they might train to run a 10K, a marathon or even an Iron man. But what if those tests do not provide a complete picture of your health? What if you are on the verge of a heart attack and have no idea? Before 30, when the human body is at its peak, it can take the strain of being pushed to the limit. As we age, however, cellular changes and the expression of genetic predispositions can dramatically alter our health. Conventional medical tests a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Walk Your Way to a Healthier Life. Start On National Walking Day!
You can get active in lots of ways, but walking is one of the easiest steps you can take to improve your health. It's also one of the safest, least expensive and most sustainable forms of exercise. For some time now I have been a passionate supporter of the American Heart Association and of National Walking Day. I ran my first marathon 10 years ago to honor the memory of my recently deceased father. It was a defining moment for me when I crossed the finish line and received my medal. I knew -right then and there- I had the power to fight heart disease by raising awareness in the community and by choosing to live a more act...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time
Sleep is one of humanity's great unifiers. It binds us to one another, to our ancestors, to our past, and to the future. No matter who we are, we share a common need for sleep. Though this need has been a constant throughout human history, our relationship to sleep, and our understanding of its vital benefits, has gone through dramatic ups and downs. And right now that relationship is in crisis. The evidence is all around us. If you type the words "why am I" into Google, the first autocomplete suggestion -- based on the most common searches -- is: "why am I so tired?" The existential cry of the modern age. And that's not ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You Are What You Sleep
If I asked you to think of the last time that you slept poorly, that would probably be easy to recall, wouldn't it? What about the last time you were well-rested? And not just quality sleep for one night, but chronically well-rested, well-rested over a long period of time? That's probably a little harder. For college students, this phenomenon is all too familiar. Having just become self-sustaining adults, students are learning for the first time how to balance work, rest, and fun. The growing pains are showing. Research at the University of Alabama suggests that 60 percent of college students aren't getting enough sleep,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pinkies Up! There Could Be Some Real Health Benefits To Drinking Tea
Tea gets short shrift as coffee’s milder little sister. But these leaves may have a lot more to offer drinkers than just their subtle taste. Large, observational studies have found lifelong tea drinkers are less likely to face early cognitive decline and get certain types of cancer, stroke, coronary heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. We should also note that by “tea,” we mean the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant that are plucked and processed in different ways to make black, green, white, oolong and pu’er teas -- not herbal infusions like peppermint, hibiscus and chamomile teas. Researchers ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tuberculosis Made Me Blind, But We Can Make Sure No One Else Needs to Suffer Like I Did
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tricks to Saving Your Teeth and Your Wallet in the End
Dear Nurse Katz, I just graduated and I am trying to stay healthy and avoid going into medical debt. I was thinking about cutting out my dental care, but I have been told that it is just as important than seeing your primary car doctor, but insurance does not seem to cover a lot when it comes to dental care, and every time I go to the dentist, I come out with a huge bill. I want to keep my teeth until I am at least 70. What should I do? Matt Kansas City, MO Good for you for thinking ahead Matt! You should not cut out oral care all together due to the expense. Keep in mind that bad oral care today could potentially lead to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Protein Series Part II: Strategic Timing
Conclusions often state there isn't much difference as long as total intake reaches a specific threshold. However, that doesn't necessarily show the best method(s) for performance, growth, recovery, or even weight-loss goals. And, by Knockout, It's... Metabolic Contextualism? Don't steal that term -- I'm going to create a philosophy or religion around it, right next to Absurdism or Existentialism. Studies show that even 10 grams of protein is sufficient to create an anabolic upturn in potential recovery, but 20 to 40 grams of protein maximizes this threshold. Counter opinions are largely contextual. If I just crushed 600 c...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Ways to Get Leaner, Stronger and Healthier This Spring
After a few months of heavy clothes, hearty food, and gloomy weather, your body, mind and spirit start to crave something different -- something lighter, brighter and more active. Fortunately, just about the time soups, sweaters, and snow are getting on your last nerve, spring shows up. And not a moment too soon! This year, take that yearning for lighter, brighter and more active things and put it to work for your health. Spring is the perfect time to make changes that will help you get leaner, stronger and healthier -- and to establish habits that will help you stay lean, strong and healthy in every season. Here are 6 th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Public Health and Citizens, Truly United
There are just two problems with the prevailing conception of "public health" -- the public, and health. Neither means what we think it means. For starters, there is no public. The public is an anonymous mass, a statistical conception, nameless, faceless, unknowable, and unlovable. I have made the case before that laboring under this crippling fiction, the potential good that all things "public health" might do is much forestalled. We talk, for instance, about the genuine potential to eliminate up to 80 percent of the total global burden of chronic disease -- heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, dementia -- but somehow...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fatness, Affluence, Adaptation and Hope
Colleagues and I recently submitted a grant application to a large foundation, seeking funds to support the True Health Initiative. The funds, should we be fortunate enough to secure them, will accelerate the development of a global communication campaign to convey the evidence and consensus-based fundamentals of healthy living, and notably, healthy eating. In particular, the grant would support a rigorous evaluation so that we could demonstrate the replacement of widespread confusion and doubts about consensus related to healthful, sustainable eating at baseline, with clarity and understanding by virtue of our efforts. Th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Surprising Everyday Items That Can Hurt Your Health
SPECIAL FROM You may watch what you eat, drink filtered water, and use your seat belt to protect yourself on the road. Yet many health hazards are lurking around us in not-so-obvious places. Here, a few to steer clear of:  1. Scented candles A fragrant candle may help you unwind and de-stress. But burning those containing a chemical calledlimonene, often used for citrus-scented candles, as well as many cleaning products, can produce fumes that are downright unhealthy. Recent British research found that households with a high levels of limonene correlated with high levels of formaldehyde, which irritates the eyes and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart Health -- Love, Happiness, Gratitude, and Learning
"Money is of no value to me. Love gives you more. You can't get rid of love, when you give more, you get more." --Warren Buffett My friend Emily Sachs Wong texted me these words after having dinner with Warren Buffett, I have no idea what they were eating and for the first time in my life I wasn't interested. Perhaps because when someone says something like that, you just let it soak in. I was struck by the fact that he so clearly expressed what seemed to me to be a profound statement about what is important in life. Emily Sachs Wong and Warren Buffett February is heart month and organizations like Go Red for Women are fo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Simple Health Tips for Buying Chocolate
Shopping for "good" chocolate is kind of like searching for a viable online date. Approach the market without a plan and it's easy to get duped by glossy packaging and false claims. Know what you're looking for, though, and you can find yourself a sweetie with substance -- guaranteed to reduce your stress levels, ignite your sex life, and make your heart sing from the first blissful encounter. In fact, findings from a new long-term study in Heart journal involving 25,000 volunteers suggest that eating up to 3.5 ounces of high-quality chocolate per day can significantly reduce risks of heart disease and stroke. Sort through...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adele Is 'Healthier Than She's Ever Been.' Here's How She Got There.
Of all Adele's many stellar qualities, her willingness to speak candidly and frankly about her life -- and her health -- is one of the top.  In a new interview with Vogue (she's the mag's March cover star), the songstress once again opened up. You may have already heard that she gave up her smoking habit when she was forced to undergo surgery on her vocal chords in 2011. As it turns out, she has since made some other pretty big changes toward a healthier lifestyle, too:  ...Adele is healthier than she has ever been. As well as the litany of foods and drink she has to avoid to protect her throat, sh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

2016 Moon Shot for Cancer: Focus on Prevention
It is now 2016, and Americans hope for a brighter, healthier new year. Are Americans healthier today than they were last year or the year before? Will there be fewer people diagnosed with cancer? According to the American Cancer Society, it is projected that in 2016 there will be 1,685,210 new cancer cases and 595,690 deaths due to cancer. This is an increase over previous years. While it is true that the death rate for several cancers has decreased (due mostly to better screening and earlier diagnosis), it is also true that several cancers are on the rise, including cancers of the thyroid, liver, pancreas, kidney, small i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oversleeping: The Effects and Health Risks of Sleeping Too Much
This article originally appeared on the Amerisleep blog. Rosie Osmun is the Creative Content Manager at Amerisleep, a progressive memory foam mattress brand focused on eco-friendly sleep solutions. Rosie writes more posts on the Amerisleep blog about the science of sleep, eco-friendly living, leading a healthy lifestyle and more. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Very Good Reasons To Take A Break At Work Today
This story is part of our monthlong “Work Well” initiative, which focuses on thriving in the workplace. You can find more stories from this project here. Only one in five U.S. workers takes a lunch break, according to recent research. And when the American workweek can easily span more than 55 hours, which puts people at a higher risk of stroke and heart disease, that's a sobering thought.  As you might imagine, there are VERY good reasons to take a break at work, and your physical health is just one of them. Need convincing? Consider this: 1. It makes you more productive than staying at your des...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You Can't Take a Vacation From Sleep Apnea
Americans took 2.1 billion trips for business or pleasure in 2014. That's a lot of time away from the comforts of home. For people with sleep apnea, travel creates the dilemma of what to do about their CPAP (continuous positive air pressure) machines: Do I lug it with me or try to struggle through sleep without it? Fortunately, there's good news with more choices in treatments and devices to help apnea sufferers sleep soundly while on the road. You don't want to be tired during your business trip. Sleep apnea is a disorder where breathing stops and starts during sleep (sometimes up to hundreds of times per night) because ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here's Some Good News About Coffee And Your Heart
Sip your coffee with peace of mind: A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association has found that caffeine doesn't cause heartbeat irregularities, despite what we've heard in the past. Researchers at the University of California San Fransisco assessed the coffee, tea and chocolate intake of 1,388 healthy men and women over a year-long period. During this time, participants also wore a portable device that monitored their heart rhythm 24 hours a day.  Sixty-one percent of participants reported drinking or eating more than one caffeinated item every day, yet the heartbeat monitors did not detect...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Buddhist Monk Is An Unsung Hero In The World's Climate Fight
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Multiple Sclerosis, Jamie-Lynn Sigler's Autoimmune Disease, Explained
In a People magazine interview on this week, Jamie-Lynn Sigler revealed that she has had multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease, for the past 15 years.  "You'd think that after all these years, somebody would be settled with something like this." Sigler told People. "It's still hard to accept." What is multiple sclerosis? MS is a degenerative nervous system disease, in which the immune system attacks it's own nerve cells, slowing down messages between the brain and the rest of the body. No one knows what causes MS, but symptoms -- which differ from person to person, but typically include muscle weakness, coordinati...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Did He Die?
Was he sick? Was it suicide? Was it a heart attack? Overdose? Did he die instantly? Who found him? Did he have a stroke? Did they try CPR? Who was he with? Did they do an autopsy? Have you read the report? Where was he? What is the cause of death? Is there a history of drugs or alcohol? Do anything of those things matter? Really? Do they matter? He is dead. Another family is grieving. They are making plans to bury their son. I, too, have questions. But I know the answers don't matter. It is not my place to ask those questions. The answers are not for me to know. What matters is that the parents are hurting. They loved thei...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Four Pillars of Longevity and Well-Being
by guest blogger Pam Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP, best-selling author and expert on health, fitness, and nutrition When I began my undergraduate years at the University of California-Berkeley, I chose cellular biology as my premed major. Enthused as I was with each course, I felt something was missing. Seeking an answer to my angst, I'd often take long, reflective walks around campus, through eucalyptus groves populated by cackling blue Steller's jays and verdant gardens punctuated by bright hibiscus and bougainvillea. And then it hit me: The answer was literally right under my nose. Gazing at the greenery around me, I realized h...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news