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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post

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September Is Childhood Obesity Month -- Get The Facts
The obesity epidemic continues to dominate headlines--and for good reason. Obesity is a leading cause of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Many of these conditions occur in adults but often begin in childhood. This September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. By knowing the facts and taking steps to help your children live a healthier lifestyle, childhood obesity and its resulting complications may be prevented. The Facts According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), one in three children in the U.S. is overweight or obese. Childhood obesity doubled in children and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Your Brain Is Making You Fat (And What To Do About It)
Thousands of Americans woke up this morning and declared, "Today is the day I start my diet. Er, well, maybe tomorrow." When you start that diet is probably irrelevant anyway. "Only 3 out of every 100 people who reach their goal manage to maintain that weight loss beyond the first year." Three! Yup, "losing weight" is no longer just an idealistic New Year's resolution; it's a daily tradition. Why is it that human beings can shoot a rocket into space, climb Everest, but can't refuse a piece of chocolate cake? It's not a lack of willpower. Processed foods have changed the way our brain chemistry to a point that our bod...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep Deprivation Is Killing You And Your Career
The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. The short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, emotional intelligence, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why You Need Adequate Sleep to Perform We've always...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Watching Grief
He lies quietly on his hospital bed placed in the middle of the family room. The sound from the television serves as perpetual background noise. Is he watching, understanding the show that's on? I don't know for sure. His wife, children and grandchildren are all around in different areas of the house. There is subdued chatter everywhere. Again, more background noise. My father-in-law's first stroke happened in 2008. Since then, he has been in and out of the hospital, in and out of therapy, up and down, a roller coaster ride. The family, of course, has also been with him on this ride. A period of panic, and then calm, com...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why 5,000 People Are Suing Over Plavix
Legal action is apparently moving forward involving lawsuits filed by thousands of people who say they suffered serious injuries by taking the once-heralded blood-thinning drug Plavix. The California Supreme Court ruled late last month that eight product liability lawsuits against Plavix manufacturer Bristol-Myers Squibb and Plavix distributor McKesson Corporation can proceed in San Francisco Superior Court. Those eight cases involved 678 plaintiffs. They may soon be joined by a multitude of other cases, involving about 5,000 plaintiffs, that have been filed around the country. There is no word yet on whether Bristol-My...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The New Loneliness
by Mehmet Oz, MD & Michael Crupain, MD, MPH Today we are more connected than ever. Between social media, text messaging, and email, it feels like we are in almost constant communication with our "friends." Speaking of friends, we've never had more and we can effortlessly keep up with all of their wonderful lives with the mere flick of a thumb. With all of this connectivity, loneliness should be a thing of the past, right? This summer, with the help of expert political pollster Mike Berland (CEO of Berland Strategy & Analytics) we conducted a survey of women from all around the country to find out the state of women's he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Becoming A Hosehead: Sleeping My Way To Better Health
CPAP machines are in the news this month after the New England Journal of Medicine released a study casting doubt on their effectiveness in preventing heart problems. See here for an explanation of the study and a summary of reasons why it is likely not accurate. Regardless of that study, let me tell you why I have become an unexpected missionary for the wonders of the CPAP. For the past year, I've been wrestling with a diagnosis of sleep apnea. What have I learned, even while kicking, screaming and denying, through the entire testing and education process? That it is a real thing, that I really do have it, and that I fee...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I'm a Diabetic, Why is my Shoulder Frozen?
What Is Adhesive Capsulitis? Adhesive capsulitis is a painful, progressive loss of shoulder motion. The shoulder is usually stiff and will not move. This condition is called "frozen shoulder". When a patient presents with adhesive capsulitis, they are unable to move their arm up or turn it to either side either with or without assistance (passive/active range of motion). Typically adhesive capsulitis occurs in approximately 2% of the population and usually affects people 40-60 years of age. Frozen shoulder tends to occur more often in females. The loss of motion occurs due to inflammation, fibrosis, scarring and contractio...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teen Reportedly Dies From His Girlfriend's Hickey
A hickey turned out to be the kiss of death for a 17-year-old boy in Mexico City. Julio Macias Gonzalez suffered a stroke that doctors reportedly think was caused by a hickey from his 24-year-old girlfriend, according to the Independent. The teen had convulsions during a family dinner and then died. The woman’s skin-sucking could have created the blood clot that traveled to Julio’s brain and led to the stroke, according to Hoyestado.com. His girlfriend, who has not been publicly identified, is reportedly in hiding. Sources told Hoyestado.com that Julio’s parents were already ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton's New Platform Is A Blow To Mental Health Stigma
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton released a wide-ranging mental health plan on Monday, saying that her office would support Americans living with mental health issues through better legislation. “The next generation must grow up knowing that mental health is a key component of overall health and there is no shame, stigma or barriers to seeking out care,” Clinton’s campaign stressed in an announcement. Of course, candidate platforms rarely remain intact if they actually become policy after election day, but Clinton’s focus on normalizing mental health treatment reflects growi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Want Your Teen To Have A Healthy Weight? Science Says Shut Up
Experts agree that talking about the need to diet and lose weight is one of the most unhealthy, counterproductive things a parent can do for a teen who is struggling with weight issues. Now, new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics formally endorse those findings. In order to prevent obesity and eating disorders, parents should focus less on diets and the scale and emphasize family togetherness and exercise for fitness, not weight loss. The AAP included both obesity and eating disorders in their recommendations because these often share unhealthy behaviors such as dieting, bingeing and having a diss...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

#HeartWarrior: Maddy Reyes
Maddy Reyes is a 12-year-old Heart Warrior participating in the 2016 Puget Sound Heart and Stroke Walk. She is also a social media ambassador, @MaddyGoCheer. I have a different heart than most kids. When I was born I was diagnosed with a heart condition called Tetralogy of Fallot. The doctors and surgeons were watching my heart very closely until I was four months old. When I was four months old my doctor told my parents that I would have to get open heart surgery to keep my heart safe. The surgeons fixed a hole in my heart and made my pulmonary artery bigger. My doctor is now watching my heart closely to see when ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 Drugs with the Most Severe Side Effects
Image Source Drugs have been known to have some sort of side effects on patients. Most of them are not often discussed in the health tabloids. While other drugs have side effects that are very nominal when compared to the benefits the patient derives from their usage, others have side effects that can impact the lives of their users forever. The most common side effects people experience from drug usage are gastrointestinal related issues which include constipation, nausea, and vomiting. Some other drugs can leave you feeling tired and dizzy for a short period of time. Combining these drugs with simple aspirin will usuall...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Find Your Calling (From 5 People Who Found Theirs)
Why does our culture perpetuate the belief that “finding oneself” is an age-specific phase, reserved only for angst-ridden teenagers and wanderlust-stricken 20-somethings? The notion of finding a passion is all-too-frequently aligned with youth and impulsivity, but truthfully, we’re all quietly seeking our next challenge, our next calling. We’re of the belief that it’s never too late to course correct your life, and given the job-hopping numbers, we’re probably not the only ones. Though the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics does not regularly track career changes, in a recent study of late...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Leading Health Mistakes Women Make In Their 30s
Credit For many women, turning 30 marks the real beginning of adulthood. You're established in a career, and maybe in a relationship. You might be thinking about starting a family. You feel pretty good about yourself, and all the health indiscretions of your 20s (remember those all-night parties and how you still managed to make it into work the next day?) haven't taken much of a health toll. But let's face it, ages 30 to 39 are prime time. All in all, the 30s are a very positive time for health, but it's also the time you have to start developing excellent habits as an investment in the future, says Dr. Debra DeJoseph,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mental Illness Affects Presidents, Too
Perhaps it isn’t surprising, given the intense rhetoric of this year’s presidential election, that politicians have started throwing around accusations of insanity.    In early August, California Rep. Karen Bass, a Democrat, launched the hashtag #DiagnoseTrump and started a change.org petition claiming the Republican nominee, Donald Trump, meets the diagnostic criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Not long after, Trump called Hillary Clinton “unstable,” and at a rally in New Hampshire said, “She’s got problems.” The candidates’ verbal volley highlights a p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Georgia O'Keefe: Artistic and Culinary Pioneer
Pedernal Mountain. by guest blogger Pam Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP, FACSM, best-selling author and expert on health, fitness, and nutrition On a recent trip to Santa Fe, I scheduled a visit Georgia O'Keefe's home and studio in Abiquiu, New Mexico. O'Keefe, known as the mother of American modernism, is most renowned for her extraordinary paintings of super-sized erotic flowers, New York skyscrapers, and New Mexico landscapes. As I neared the property, I immediately spotted her frequently painted wooden ladder, leaning against a wall, its top rungs extending high above the rooftop. The ladder. Photo by Dr. Peeke. Stepping in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Maximize Your Yoga Calorie Burn
By Kristen Domonell for Life by Daily Burn Photo: Pond5 When considering a yoga class, the benefits of stress relief and stretching probably come to mind, more so than sweating and torching calories. But you can say Namaste to a serious heart-pumping workout with just a few tweaks to your flow. In fact, new research from the American College of Sports Medicine proves that sun salutations can count as your vigorous exercise for the week — as long as you push yourself through some powerful poses and add in a little strength training. Learn what actually counts as high-intensity exercise and why it's so important to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plant-Based Diets Protect From Heart Disease Better Than Mediterranean Diets
The Mediterranean diet has long been touted for its benefits as an overall balanced way of eating. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine looked at the Mediterranean diet as it relates to prevention of heart disease, finding that it may be protective against heart attack and stroke. But according to Washington DC based group, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a better way to prevent heart disease is to focus on high-fiber, plant-based foods. These include fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains. These foods provide safe and healthy sources of omega-3 fats without the risks of toxin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Conference To Clinic: The Longest Yard On Nutrition
The contrast between science and clinical practice can be so stark that it is shocking. I just returned from Washington, D.C. and the International Conference on Nutrition in Medicine sponsored by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and the Georgetown University School of Medicine. The first patient I saw in my preventive cardiology clinic after returning from the conference described his 25 year struggle with heart disease including 2 separate bypass operations, numerous stents, and activity severely limited by angina chest pain. He could barely walk to the mailbox without taking a nitro tablet under his ton...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research Reveals That Increased Education About Sleep Apnea Leads to Better Outcomes
Sleep-disordered breathing is a problem that should not be taken lightly. In addition to leaving you feeling groggy during the day, untreated sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea can lead to several other health problems, including high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes and heart disease. Effective treatments such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy and oral appliance therapy are available to treat obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep Apnea Treatment Options Obstructive sleep apnea is caused when the tongue and soft palate collapse onto the back of the throat during sleep, blocking the upper airway....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Will Too Much Sleep Make You Fat?
In last week's article, you learned exactly how not getting enough sleep (less than about 7 hours per night), can cause fat gain, muscle loss and an inability to control the appetite, along with increased risk for a host of chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. But the solution is definitely not to begin sleeping as much as you possibly can. Oversleeping may seem like a good idea to fight off the fat gain that can accompany undersleeping, but it's been shown that sleeping in excess of 9 hours per night can be just as damaging to your sleep cycles and your waistline as not getting enough sleep, and in this article...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In the Raw: To Cook or Not to Cook?
Imagine never again savoring the smell of baking cakes or charbroiled steak. Could you? Why would you? Yet some people worldwide are turning away not only from meat and processed food, but also from cooking. Welcome to the raw food diet. As the Standard American Diet becomes more fat-laden, sugar-sated, and processed, the prevalence of metabolic disorders, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are soaring. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), obesity now affects nearly 35 percent of the population of the United States, over 29 million people have been diagnosed with t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: It's Time To Break The Meat Habit
Last weekend, I rallied at the White House with 100 fellow doctors to share an urgent message with America: Break the meat habit to improve your health. WATCH THE VIDEO HERE Why now? Poor diet is the No. 1 cause for disease and death in the country, recently even surpassing smoking. Meat has been strongly linked to America's top killers, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and even certain types of cancer. Unfortunately, Americans are among the biggest meat-eaters on the planet, consuming a whopping 270.7 pounds of meat per person each year. Two new studies released this week add further proof that Amer...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One Hour of Exercise Can Offset Prolonged Sitting
A typical day for many people includes at least 8 hours of sitting - driving to work, sitting in an office, driving home, and watching TV. An international study of more than 1 million people shows that one hour of moderate physical activity can eliminate the health risks associated with sedentary behavior. The study forms the first part of a four-paper series published by The Lancet that provides an overview and update of worldwide trends of physical activity and the global impact of physical inactivity. The first series observing physical activity was released in 2012 ahead of the Summer Olympic Games. The study autho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UPDATE: How Much Vitamin D Should You Take?
Conclusions What is the sweet spot for vitamin D and longevity? All studies are in agreement: 40-50 ng/ml. If I had a (working) magic wand, I'd make this range much broader - but, there it is. Since it is narrow, let's cover the main sources of Vitamin D and figure out how you can get to the exact target. Sources of vitamin D We get vitamin D from supplements, sun and food--and in that order for most of us. Food Considering that we need thousands of IU's of vitamin D per day, food doesn't have that much. Some of the highest sources have only a few hundred units. Food sources of Vitamin D:[13] Salmon: 4 oz. = 500 IU...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our Sedentary Lifestyles Cost About 5 Million Lives A Year
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A study of one million people has found that physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses, but an hour a day of exercise could eliminate most of that. Sedentary lifestyles are linked to increased risks of heart disease, diabetes and cancer, researchers found, but activity - such as brisk walking - could counter the higher likelihood of early death linked with sitting for eight or more hours a day. Such inactivity is estimated to cause more than 5 million deaths a year - almost as many as smoking, which the World Health Organi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are We Consoling Or Judging?
Joshua Earle via Unsplash When we hear that someone has died, we can't help but scrutinize the way they passed--as if dying were a contest. Were they young or old? How long did they suffer? Did the family see it coming? The more shocking, the more we secretly revel in the details. . . . Yet the more shocking, the more awkward we are at comforting the bereft. When my husband committed suicide three years ago, it was the most unspeakable of departures to many of our friends and acquaintances. They didn't exactly know what to say. "Well, at least it wasn't cancer!" and "He was able to go quick and on his own terms!" were co...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Woman Who Lost Her Sense of 'Mine'
(Photo: Steven Taylor) By Melissa Dahl People get attached to their stuff. Two-year-olds, for instance, have very strong opinions about what's theirs ("MINE!"), and are suspicious about sharing, no matter what nonsense their adult caregivers spew about this caring thing. And although (most) people eventually learn to follow appropriate social norms, that relationship to stuff and things still matters throughout the life span, and even, in a way, beyond it -- when you're gone, after all, your loved ones will likely inherit your most prized possessions. If nothing else, at least your memory will live on through, say, a par...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical Errors Are The Third Leading Cause Of Death -- How You Can Avoid Them
It is astonishing that medical errors are the third leading cause of death in America. The most recent data indicates that 251,000 deaths are due to medical errors, a frightening number. Every person should be concerned about this. In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published that 98,000 deaths occurred annually due to medical errors. This was just an estimate and of course they suggested more studies to confirm this. Recently, investigators at Johns Hopkins Medical Center updated those 1999 figures. They reviewed 4 studies of patients from throughout America between 2000 and 2008, representing over 37 million admissions...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Extreme Sitting' For More Than 10 Hours A Day Linked To Heart Disease
By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – Being sedentary, at least in moderation, is unlikely to cause heart disease, according to a new review of past research. Based on their analysis, researchers conclude that only very high levels of sedentary time ― more than 10 hours per day ― are linked to an increased risk of heart attack, stroke or heart disease-related death. Compared to sitting for less than three of one’s waking hours each day, more than 10 hours of sedentary time was tied to an 8 percent increase in risk for developing heart disease. “Our findings suggest that sedentary time is associated with...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 8 Bad Eating Habits You Need to Break in Your 20s
We all know how it goes. You're away from home for the first time. You're completely in charge of your own meals. Mom and Dad always said you couldn't have cake and Cocoa Puffs for dinner? Well now you can have the whole cake and no one is there to say a word. Eventually, though, your body is not going to like all that damage. Learn how to end those bad habits now, so your future self won't want to come back to punch you in the face. 1. Eating dinner at midnight Eating a late dinner can screw up your body's natural cycles. It can interfere with your sleep schedule, for one thing, but it might also be the reason that y...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moringa's Health Benefits In Lowering Inflammation
Copyright: Brenda Dawson/UC Davis Moringa is known throughout the world as a miracle tree. But, what exactly is moringa and why is research buzzing about the possible health benefits of this hearty plant? Moringa is a tree that is an important crop native to India and currently grown throughout the world in Latin America, Southeast Asia and Africa. The entire tree is edible, from its roots, flowers, leaves, seeds, gum, fruits and bark. Generally, moringa is consumed by cooking the leaves or immature fruits and more recently as a dried leaf powder used as tea or sprinkled into food. Although 13 species exist in the morin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Every Woman Needs A Good Night's Rest
When I began writing in this spot three years ago, the headline of my very first entry was, "Getting Enough Sleep Is Smart, Not Selfish." That post went up at a time when Americans were beginning to focus more on a good night's rest. The subject came into a sharper focus, in part, because wearable technology gave us some specifics. Forget the anecdotal evidence of whether we slept well; with the touch of a button, we could know what time we fell asleep, how long we were out and how often our sleep was interrupted. The study of sleep -- and conversations around it -- began gaining traction. Among those paying keen attenti...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Its Like To Be A Caregiver
The following is a Q&A with Suzanne A., a Southern California-based caregiver. Suzanne is a caregiver to her husband Gil, who suffered multiple strokes and is now a paraplegic. With Gil unable to work, Suzanne works part-time to support them. Q: What do people not know about being a caregiver? Suzanne: Because of social media, our society has been introduced to many people who are caregivers that share their compassion and their struggles. However, each caregiver has a unique dynamic. They are either a caregiver for a spouse, a parent, a grandparent or a friend, and each caregiving situation is different. It also tak...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Yoga Saved My Life: My Journey From Worrier To Warrior
A year ago today I went blind. Nine days after the birth of my daughter, my brain began to bleed and I awoke in the Intensive Care Unit-I had suffered a stroke. My left side function had been compromised, my vision was blurred, and the hope of being home for my brand new baby was shattered. Before the bleed I was a healthy and happy 34-year-old woman, after the bleed I became someone I could not even recognize. After two weeks my vision slowly returned, the swelling in my brain had not disappeared; but diminished, and I was released to go home and attempt to resume a new kind of normal as a Stroke Survivor. I was sent ho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chelation Remains A Hopeful Heart Therapy
Maybe you know someone who has suffered a heart attack. You're concerned about their well-being, particularly if they're diabetic or suffered a large heart attack. You want to make sure that absolutely everything that can help this loved one stay healthy and alive is discussed with their doctors. Odds are very high, however, that there's one promising therapy the doctor won't tell them about: chelation therapy. Chelation therapy was designed decades ago to trap and remove serious environmental toxins like arsenic. While using it, some practitioners noted improvements in symptoms of heart disease, and chelation began to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Economic Benefits Of Healthier Eating: Why Corporations Can Be Natural Allies To Promote Better Diets
Nutrition is at the heart of many of the most important issues in our lives. From nourished children to vibrant aging, from social justice to sustainability, how we eat plays a major role in our health, our culture, and our happiness. Yet, we rarely consider the tremendous economic impact of our food choices. Suboptimal nutrition is the leading cause of poor health in the United States and globally, principally related to chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, obesity, diabetes, and several cancers. In many nations, the costs of healthcare dwarf other programs in the national budget. In the United States, nearly ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Exercise Shapes You, Far Beyond the Gym
(Photo: Grady Reese) By Bradley Stulberg When I first started training for marathons a little over ten years ago, my coach told me something I've never forgotten: that I would need to learn how to be comfortable with being uncomfortable. I didn't know it at the time, but that skill, cultivated through running, would help me as much, if not more, off the road as it would on it. It's not just me, and it's not just running. Ask anyone whose day regularly includes a hard bike ride, sprints in the pool, a complex problem on the climbing wall, or a progressive powerlifting circuit, and they'll likely tell you the same: A diff...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Things You Should Know About Hospice Care
"Do everything, Doc." That's typically what many family members say when a loved one is diagnosed with a terminal illness, and can no longer make health decisions independently. Even when they are told that any further interventions may be futile, they often still say "do everything". In many ways, that is an easy response --- it's the answer many family members think society wants them to say, and it seems "safe." It often is much harder to put limits on the amount of medical care a loved one receives. And I understand when family members say "I'm not ready to let go." Death is never an easy topic to talk about, and yet ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Gift From Jack
This morning, I was sitting in the courtyard next to our home working on my computer. The weather was terrific, clear and breezy. I was focused on a deadline that needed my full attention, but that didn't stop me from enjoying the terrific weather... and a wonderfully robust, rich brown-wrapped cigar. As I settled in, I noticed an older gentleman approaching out of the corner of my eye. On occasion, I've seen this same man walking around our neighborhood. He's tall and lanky, walking gingerly with a cane. By his gait, I suspect he may have had a stroke at some point. He continued walking towards me -- and the empty cha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

African American Women And Uterine Fibroids: Why More Awareness Is Needed To Overcome This Health Disparity
African American women are nearly three times more likely to develop uterine fibroids and suffer with severe symptoms like heavy menstrual bleeding, anemia, and pelvic pain. From interfering with daily activities to negatively affecting intimate relationships, fibroids have a much more dramatic impact on black women in comparison to women of other races. Given these realities, many are left questioning why fibroid research has lagged in the past and what's being done now to overcome this all-too-common health disparity. "One of the issues with fibroid research is that, because it's built as a disease process that mostly ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

THIS Is The Scary Stuff That Happens To Your Body During A Heat Wave
For Teen Vogue, by Brittney McNamara. Photo: Getty Images Temperatures in some states are going to hit 120 degrees. This summer, some parts of the country could get so hot that not even a pool party will cool you down. In fact, the weekend will bring dangerous temperatures to the western part of the country, spiking thermometers to record highs in places like Arizona and Southern California, ABC News reports. Meteorologists are predicting temperatures as high as 118 degrees in Phoenix, Arizona, creeping up to 119 degrees on Monday. In Death Valley, California, temperatures are expected to hit 120 next week, while Las ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coconut Oil: Why You Should Question the Hype
by Carra Richling Coconut has become a popular and trendy "super food." Ever since some preliminary research started claiming that it can cure everything from heart disease to Alzheimer's, and even aid in weight loss, coconut products have flooded the market. They include coconut oils, margarines, milks, yogurts and ice cream, and many products are substituting in coconut oil in order to gain market value. There is, however, still a dearth of validated scientific research on the benefits of coconut, so it remains unclear whether or not the trend is the result of marketing hype. For example, the Alzheimer's Association no...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ask JJ: Type 2 Diabetes
Dear JJ: My doctor just diagnosed me with pre-diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in my family, but I will not accept it as my fate. You've written about sugar's detrimental impact, so how can I get this under control so it doesn't blow up into full-blown diabetes? Diabetes doesn't happen overnight or linearly, but when your metabolic machinery breaks, serious havoc ensues. The massive repercussions can become deadly. Every time you eat, you raise blood sugar, which triggers your pancreas to release a hormone called insulin. Every food raises blood sugar, but high-sugar impact foods do it big time. Your pancreas "secretes s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When Your Blood Pressure Reaches 180/100 Sell
I have never been in the best of shape. You can certainly say I am in a shape; it's called round. Of course, when I was younger, I had a lot more muscle. Over time, I traded some of that muscle for fat (got a great two-for-one deal down at the fat store). But with that weight gain came a variety of issues -- the worst being high blood pressure. I've been on medication for a while and it's normally under control. I take a measurement at home and most often it's within an acceptable range. At least, what I consider an acceptable range; as long as my head does not explode I'm good. Every six months my doctor's office insists...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Experiments at the Forefront of Sleep Science
As part of the team at Experiment.com, a crowdfunding platform for science, I get to talk to scientists all the time. I've been an insomniac and poor sleeper all my life, so I decided to run a Sleep Challenge Grant to launch a batch of sleep experiments together on the site. Here's what I'm learning from 10 scientists at the forefront of sleep research: Men who go to sleep late have more sex. "Evening men," who naturally wake up later and go to sleep later, tend to have higher mating success but lower success in social settings like school or business. Dr. Christoph Randler wants to investigate whether there are clues fo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

It Won't Be Easy to Reduce the Salt in Our Diets
You might want to take the latest campaign to reduce our daily consumption of sodium with a grain of salt. On second thought, maybe you shouldn't. Officials at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have announced two-year and 10-year voluntary goals to slowly lower the average daily intake of sodium by Americans. The reason is simple. Excess sodium consumption can lead to higher blood pressure and other health problems. Despite the obvious motivation, nutritionists interviewed by Healthline say these goals may not be easy to obtain. Our propensity for packaged foods and dining out at restaurants has created a salty h...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Summer Seafood Swimsuit Slim Down
There is nothing sexy about a flat-faced fish. Its got two eyes on one side, looks kinda slimy and seems like it should have stayed in the prehistoric era; but this freaky fish may hold the key to you squeezing into your swimsuit this summer. Whether you're rocking a one piece, speedo or bikini this little guy, like all his seafood friends, can help us shed our winter weight in a surprisingly short period of time. When I work with diabetic patients that are trying to lower their BMI or raise their HDL-cholesterol I try and get them to start cooking up some of this protein packed superfood. However, I have to admit, I d...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Decrease the Symptoms of Sleep Apnea
by Phil Hardesty New research is showing that exercise not only helps the quality of our sleep, but it can improve conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA. What is OSA? Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition where a person's breathing frequently pauses during sleep. One of the most noticeable sign of OSA is snoring. Other signs and symptoms of OSA are: Excessive daytime fatigue and sleepiness Observed episodes of breathing cessation during sleep Abrupt awakenings accompanied by shortness of breath Awakening with a dry mouth or sore throat Awakening with chest pain Sudden waking with gasping for breath Mornin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news