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Total 340 results found since Jan 2013.

Pollution Kills 1.7 Million Children Every Year, WHO Says
A quarter of all global deaths of children under five are due to unhealthy or polluted environments including dirty water and air, second-hand smoke and a lack or adequate hygiene, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday. Such unsanitary and polluted environments can lead to fatal cases of diarrhea, malaria and pneumonia, the WHO said in a report, and kill 1.7 million children a year. “A polluted environment is a deadly one -– particularly for young children,” WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said in a statement. “Their developing organs and immune systems, and smaller bodies and airway...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Best Instagram Accounts For Runners
There’s just something about running that commands our attention.  Perhaps it’s the way marathoners look when they’re crossing the finishing line or how runners make a challenging sport look so easy. It could also be the promise of the runner’s high, which is the sense of euphoria people feel after logging the first few miles. Additionally, research shows that running ― even just 10 minutes, five days a week ― can reduce the risk of stroke, arthritis, diabetes, high cholesterol and possibly some cancers.  If all of that isn’t convincing enough, we’ve got some visuals f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8 Things You Need To Know Before Your First Indoor Cycling Class
For SELF, by Emily Abbate. Top trainers break down the basics of the bike. Signing up for your first indoor cycling class can be mega intimidating. But big names like SoulCycle and Flywheel have cult followings for a reason: Adrenaline-infused rides filled with feel-good camaraderie and bumpin’ playlists make great low-impact cardio workouts — and provide a major endorphin boost. Before you get in the saddle (that’s cycling lingo for seat), here’s everything you need to know about tackling your first indoor cycling class. 1. Register online well before your desired class date. Studios open onl...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I Saved A Life And Training Made The Difference
By Christiana Adams I saved a life. I never thought it would happen to me, but it did. And, thanks to the great education process at Salem Health, I was prepared and confident to step in and assist. I’m employed at Salem Health in Salem, Oregon, as an emergency department technician in the Emergency Department and provide direct patient care. At the time of the incident, I was a unit assistant in Labor and Delivery and typically didn’t work with patients. I was, however, still required to complete CPR training, something for which I give Salem Health a lot of credit. In fact, I had just completed a new type of...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

David Cassidy Has Dementia. Here’s What That Means
Actor and singer David Cassidy recently revealed he has dementia, but what exactly does this term mean? Cassidy, who is 66, told People magazine on Monday (Feb. 20) that he has dementia, and will stop touring as a musician because of his diagnosis. The actor also said that both his mother and grandfather suffered from dementia. “I was in denial, but a part of me always knew this was coming,” Cassidy said. Dementia is not a specific disease, but rather a group of symptoms resulting from changes in the brain that affect people’s ability to carry out everyday activities, according to Mayo Clinic. These sympt...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Truth, And The Tribulations Of Randomized Diet Trials
This study has not been done. This study will not be done. Whatever you do, don’t hold your breath waiting for it.But, so what?Let’s contrast our ostensible need for this RCT to how we know what we know about putting out house fires.First, there has never been, to the best of my knowledge, a RCT to show that water is a better choice than gasoline. Do you think we need such a trial, to establish the legitimacy of the basic theme (i.e., use water) of the “right” approach? Would you, and your home, be willing to participate in such a trial when you call 911- knowing you might randomly be assigned to the gasoline a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

China, India Account For Half World's Pollution Deaths In 2015
China and India accounted for more than half of the total number of global deaths attributable to air pollution in 2015, researchers said in a study published on Tuesday. The U.S.-based Health Effects Institute (HEI) found that air pollution caused more than 4.2 million early deaths worldwide in 2015, making it the fifth highest cause of death, with about 2.2 million deaths in China and India. The institute’s study, the first of its kind, was based on the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project, a database backed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that tracks the role that behavioral, dietary and environmental...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fat Shaming Can Literally Break Your Heart
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

On National Wear Red Day, Let's Empower Women To Know Their Numbers To Help Reduce Heart Disease
Today is National Wear Red Day, an opportunity to splash this vibrant color into your wardrobe as a declaration of your support for women with heart disease and stroke. Doing so will link you in solidarity with Americans everywhere, including TV personalities across the networks and around the country. The tribute even extends to buildings and landmarks that will be bathed in red light. We hope each glimpse is a reminder of the toll that heart disease takes, not just on the victims but also on the survivors left without a mother or a daughter, a wife or a friend, a colleague or a neighbor, or any other key roles in our liv...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Four Questions You Should Ask Yourself About Brain Health
I don’t watch much TV, and when I do, I rarely pay attention to commercials. But a new ad caught my eye the other day: in it, a middle-aged accountant talks frankly about his passion for his work. Numbers, he says, just come naturally to him, and he feels like his brain is firing on all cylinders when he’s working at something he loves. Then, the CEO of AARP walks into the frame and announces a new website featuring quizzes, games, and other applications designed to promote the brain health of older Americans. Having spent a good portion of my career working to make brain health as well-known a term as heart h...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Skipping Breakfast Could Increase Your Risk Of Heart Disease
(Reuters Health) - Planning meals and snacks in advance and eating breakfast every day may help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, new guidelines from U.S. doctors say. Eating more calories earlier in the day and consuming less food at night may also reduce the odds of a heart attack, stroke or other cardiac or blood vessel diseases, according to the scientific statement from the American Heart Association. “When we eat may be important to consider, in addition to what we eat,” said Marie-Pierre St-Onge, chair of the group that wrote the guidelines and a nutrition researcher at Columbia University Medica...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise May Be As Valuable As Good Genes In Lowering Dementia Risk
This study is still epidemiological data, Heisz noted ― which means it shows a link between sedentary behavior and dementia risk, but doesn’t necessarily explain how one leads to the other. But taken with previous research that has linked physical activity is to lower dementia risk, the results are fairly convincing, she added. This study included a large number of individuals, it followed those individuals for five years and it controlled for other dementia risk factors, including age, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, depression and smoking.  More studies are needed to identify what types...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Odilia Beat The Odds As A Child; Soon She'll Be Walking A Runway In A Red Dress
As a 5-year-old settling into a temporary home, Odilia Cristabel Flores made friends right away. Bonding with kids was easy. Her spunky personality quickly won over adults, too. Everyone laughed as she rode through hallways on a skateboard, steering from her knees. Her popularity went up a notch when she became the first person on the floor with a TV. Sometimes the gatekeepers wouldn't let Odilia visit her new pals. She often ignored the rules, sneaking in and staying for as long as she could. When caught and sent to her room, she got even by breaking things made of glass. Thermometers, mostly. You see, Odilia's new ho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Reasons Being Kind Is Good for Your Health
Lend a Hand When you help others, you may be helping yourself, especially as you age: A five-year study in the American Journal of Public Health found that people 65 and older who didn’t assist friends, neighbors or relatives had a 30 percent higher chance of dying after a stressful life event, like a job loss, than those who were generous. And volunteering for a good cause can give you a greater sense of purpose, which may lower your risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to an analysis of ten studies with around 136,000 subjects. Head to volunteermatch.org to find opportunities (searchable by location, interes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain Cells Of 'Villainous Character' Might Explain Diseases Like Parkinson's
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Is Your Body On Spicy Foods
While some of us avoid restaurant meal descriptions including words like cayenne, chili, and habanero, others jump on board. And new research suggests there might be a heart-healthy benefit to eating spicy foods.  A large study recently published in the journal PLOS One looked at the connection between hot red chili pepper consumption and mortality. Researchers from the University of Vermont surveyed a nationally representative sample of 16,179 U.S. adults over the course of 6 years, finding that those who ate hot peppers at least once a month had a 13 percent reduced risk of dying from heart disease or stroke. The st...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Stress Can Cause A Heart Attack
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTim...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nine Easy Ways to Gain Control of Your Health in Your Forties
What lifestyle changes should you make to stay healthy through your 40s? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Keck Medicine of USC, 500+ internationally renowned doctors at a leading academic medical center, on Quora: Getting older has its perks. Chances are you're more confident, have more direction and a defined sense of self. While your health is likely not a primary concern, it's important to take steps now to stop subtle changes before they become major health issues. Your 40s is the decade that your habits sta...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Turns Out Oranges Aren't The Best Source Of Vitamin C, After All
It’s that time of year. The time of year when everyone around us is sick and all us healthy people are popping Emergen-Cs and vitamin C tablets in a desperate attempt to try to remain well. Here’s the thing you should know: despite the commonly held belief, vitamin C doesn’t actually help you fight a cold ― it took 50 years of research to conclude that.  But just because it can’t keep you from getting sick, that doesn’t mean you should discard vitamin C altogether. It is a crucial part of a healthy diet. Vitamin C is believed to help us stay healthy against cardiovascular disease, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lena Dunham Just Made A Super Important Point About Mental Health
Lena Dunham has an important reminder about your psychological well-being and this time it’s about burnout. The actress recently spoke to Glamour magazine about the intense pressure she put on herself when her show “Girls” began. “Making my deal with HBO as a 23-year-old woman, I felt that I had so much to prove,” she said. “I felt like I had to be the person who answered emails the fastest, stayed up the latest, worked the hardest.” Dunham revealed that she often gave up rest and moments to recharge in an effort to make it seem like she was deserving of her opportunity. “As ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You Can Actually Die From Grief
Just hours after her daughter, Carrie Fisher, died of a heart attack on Dec. 27, actress Debbie Reynolds reportedly suffered a fatal stroke at the age of 84. “She’s now with Carrie, and we’re all heartbroken,” Reynolds’ son, Todd Fisher, said from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, according to the Associated Press. The stress of his sister’s death “was too much” for his mother, Fisher said. While it’s impossible to say whether or not acute distress contributed to Reynolds’ death, it’s medically possible for stressful life events to trigger fat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Want to Lose Weight? Add This One Thing to Your Diet
What are the best ways to lose weight? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Keck Medicine of USC, 500+ internationally renowned doctors at a leading academic medical center, on Quora: Learn the secret to losing weight - and improve your overall health at the same time. Fiber. It's not a sexy solution, but it's one that works wonders for maintaining a healthy weight. Beans, vegetables, fruit and grains all contain fiber, which helps keep your digestive tract clean, healthy and at peak function. But, did you know that...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Carrie Fisher's Death Highlights The Reality Of Heart Disease In Women
Carrie Fisher died early Tuesday morning, four days after suffering a heart attack on a flight from London to Los Angeles. The actress and author, best known for her iconic role as Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” franchise, was 60 years old.  Experts say that Fisher’s death highlights an important reality about heart disease: It is the leading cause of death among men and women alike in the U.S. While heart disease encompasses many different conditions, a heart attack occurs when coronary arteries become blocked and oxygenated blood can’t reach the heart. About 735,000 Americans have hea...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Tips To Lower Diabetes Risk in Menopause During the Holidays
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In Times of Uncertainty, Keep Calm and Get Covered
It's no secret that the Affordable Care Act, President Obama's signature healthcare legislation, is facing an uncertain future. The incoming administration has pledged to repeal the law and offer an alternative in its place. But this uncertain future should not keep you from taking advantage of what is available to you and your loved ones today. Thursday is the deadline to ensure coverage under the ACA when the calendar turns to 2017. This goes for both uninsured Americans seeking coverage and those who need to re-enroll. Missing the deadline doesn't mean you're out; it just means you won't have coverage Jan. 1. The final...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. Life Expectancy Falls As More People Die From Illnesses
Rising mortality from a variety of illnesses caused life expectancy for Americans to drop in 2015 for the first in more than two decades, according to a National Center For Health Statistics study released Thursday. The drop of 0.1 percent was small ― life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years in 2015, compared with 78.9 years in 2014. But it reverses a long trend, and the factors that led to it are worth looking at. Diseases caused more deaths in 2015 than they did the year before. Age-adjusted death rates increased overall by 1.2 percent, from 724.6 deaths per 100,000 standard population in 2014 to 733.1 in...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Number Can Say A Lot About Your Health. Do You Know What It Is?
First thing–figure out what your resting heart rate (RHR) is today: Pick a time when you feel relaxed (so not right after a tense meeting) and haven’t had caffeine within an hour or exercised within two hours, because both can leave your heart rate elevated. Then, find a pulse point on your neck or wrist, count the beats for 10 seconds and multiply the number of beats by 6. If you got between 50 and 60 beats per minute, “that’s a very good range,” says Gordon Blackburn, MD, head of cardiac rehabilitation at the Cleveland Clinic. For every 10 beats it goes up, your risk of coronary artery disea...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Diet Soda Could Actually Prevent You From Losing Weight
Reaching for a diet soda may actually hinder weight loss efforts, a new study done in mice suggests. In experiments, researchers found that the artificial sweetener aspartame, which is found in some diet drinks, may contribute to the development of a condition called “metabolic syndrome,” which involves a cluster of symptoms, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a large waist size. People with metabolic syndrome face an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. The researchers found how aspartame could be linked with metabolic syndrome: Aspartame may stop a key gut enzyme ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does Diet Soda Cause Weight Gain?
This study shows quite nicely that non-caloric sweeteners can alter gut microbes in mice -- a change that has negative metabolic consequences -- and provides preliminary evidence that it can happen in humans too. Unexpected consequences To further appreciate how complicated our handling of diet soda can be, here's another little example: Our intestine (or bowel) is covered with cells that secrete hormones. These cells react to the presence and composition of food by secreting peptides such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin - these names are not important - that work on the brain, sig...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Alert, Well-Hydrated Artist in No Acute Distress--Episode Thirty-Three: In the Clench of Critics
A serial about two artists with incurable neurological disease sharing fear, frustration and friendship as they push to complete the most rewarding creative work of their careers. Read Episode Thirty-Two: Blank and Full of Expectation. Or, start at the beginning: An Illness's Introduction. Find all episodes here. My novel was not going to get published. I'm sorry to have taken so long to read Catherine Armsden's fine and singular first novel, especially since I won't be making an offer for it. Her approach to the experience of going home after a long absence is utterly original, thanks to her training as an architec...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Letters Of Gratitude Help Bring Thanksgiving Home
A lovely note crossed my desk recently. "You know something?" began the letter from 74-year-old Mrs. P, who received home care for complications from diabetes. "I would sooner do this than complain. People take the time to complain, but they will never tell you when something is going really well." One of the great privileges of my job overseeing patient care services at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York is that I get to hear from people like Mrs. P, telling me when things are indeed going well--and how that impacts their lives and the lives of those whom they dearly love. The note from Mrs. P went on to praise one ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Advice For A Happy, Healthy Life From A Man Dedicated To Those Pursuits
Why do you what you do? Can you trace the source of your professional motivation to a single event or person? As CEO of the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, I'm privileged to interact with many amazing leaders in cardiovascular medicine, technology, business and beyond. I'm always fascinated by the backstory of how each chose the path into a particular field. When it comes to medical professionals, some simply love the science. Others are drawn by the desire to help people. And then there are those to whom it's personal. Dr. Steven Houser fits all three categories. After four years of playin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are You Getting Older - Or Are You Getting Sleep Apnea?
By Brandon R. Peters, MD As my 81-year-old grandma likes to remind me on occasion, "It's hell to get old." More than a nuisance, the cumulative decline that comes with aging can significantly compromise one's quality of life and health. What if some of the problems so often associated with growing older didn't need to occur? Better yet, what if some of these physical and mental impairments could be reversed? Consider the role of sleep apnea as an unexpected contributor to many ailments erroneously attributed to aging and the reversals possible with effective treatment. Sleep Changes with Age It is clear that sleep chang...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Foot Problems That Can Be Serious
If you want to know the state of your health, try looking down. “There’s no question it’s extremely important that people pay attention to their feet,” says Terry Philbin, D.O., spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and a foot and ankle specialist at the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Center in Westerville, Ohio. The condition of your feet can give you clues to a host of medical issues, such as diabetes, arthritis, and even heart disease. Read on to find out what to look for and what it may mean. 1. Pain “There’s no pain that should be ignored,” says Jane ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 Major Health Problems That Disproportionately Affect Vets
Veterans are more likely to report very good or excellent health than their civilian counterparts, so they may not realize that they’re also at greater risk than civilians for some long-term health problems. Of course, many veterans have acute physical health problems, like wounds and amputations, and trauma-based mental health issues like depression and PTSD. Indeed, mental health issues affect 30 percent of Vietnam veterans, 20 percent of Iraqi veterans and about 10 percent of Gulf War and Afghanistan veterans. Less known are some of the ordinary, chronic conditions that disproportionately affect ser...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Perfect Match: health, Hippocrates and lifestyle medicine
Amid the frustration and despair associated with rising premiums, healthcare costs and obesity prevalence, is a trend that is slowly infiltrating the healthcare industry. Although some of the most notable trends (in fitness and nutrition) tend to come and go as quickly as a fastball (World Series, anyone?), this particular trend has an immense amount of staying power based on current scientific research. This immense power has little to do with pharmacological interventions and prescription refills and much more to do with our feet, forks, fingers and minds. This trend, as written in a recent article by the influential and...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Not All Caregivers' Stories Are The Same, But Their Pain Is
I had a great conversation the other day with a woman who takes care of her 90-year-old mother. Her mom continues to live independently, which is a nice way of saying that her daughter would prefer having her fingernails ripped out than having mom come stay with her. The daughter pays through the nose to have in-home caregivers pretty much around the clock. Before you rush to judge and marvel at what money can buy, just know that this adult daughter feels the burden of caregiving as acutely as the rest of us. She feels the same sense of loss, the same guilt, the same obligation, the same sometimes-resentment. She too makes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Woman's Place is at the Table
As I watched Donald Trump pace behind Hillary Clinton during the second presidential debate, I noticed myself growing increasingly uncomfortable. At the time, I attributed my discomfort to the generalized anxiety accompanying this particularly contentious election cycle. It was only when I saw the Saturday Night Live parody of that debate that I realized what had truly spooked me. It was the way Alec Baldwin, playing Donald Trump, lurked menacingly behind Kate McKinnon, playing Hillary Clinton, throughout the event. It was on his final swerve across the frame, to the soundtrack of Jaws, that I understood the source of my d...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Men From The South Are More Likely To Die From Smoking-Related Cancers
Smoking causes nearly 29 percent of all cancer deaths among Americans over the age of 35, according to a new analysis published in JAMA Internal Medicine. But that doesn’t tell the full story. Men from the top five southern states skew this data, dying at a rate that’s 40 percent higher than the national average. The higher proportion of cancer deaths attributable to smoking in the South isn’t simply because people in that region smoke more ― that distinction goes to the Midwest. Instead, experts say, the lack of funding for tobacco control programs means that there are less resources for people wh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can't Sleep? Now There's A Coach For That.
First came diet coaches, exercise coaches, career coaches and spiritual and life coaches. There should be no surprise that as the population ages and increasingly has trouble staying asleep that the next step would be sleep coaches. Insomnia is the most common sleep problem for adults, and has been linked to depression, falls, stroke and memory problems. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, or CBTI, is considered a highly effective method for treating the disorder, but many do not receive it due to a lack of therapists with CBTI training, according to a paper published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Socie...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Very Simple Tips For Healthy Living When You Are On A Tight Budget
Image Credit People with a limited budget are often concerned about the potential costs of making changes in their life that will improve their overall health. However, there are many small changes that you can take at a limited cost and some may actually even save you money. Some of them are: 1. Walking One of the major causes of low levels of fitness and poor health is not getting enough exercise. People often argue that they do not have the money to start a new exercise regime as a gym membership is usually expensive. However, there are plenty of ways that you can exercise for free and the easiest one of these is ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Keep Your Kidneys Healthy
Here's a fact you can impress your friends with -- every 30 minutes your kidneys filter all the blood in your body eliminating waste and excess fluid. Pretty amazing isn't it. Yet, how many of us really know how well are kidneys are functioning? One in three Americans are at risk for developing kidney disease and approximately 26 million Americans have kidney disease with most not knowing it. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a condition causing reduced kidney function over a period of time. It is diagnosed when a person's glomerular filtration rate remains below 60 milliliters per minute for more than 3 months or when a per...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Doctors Want Politicians To Know About Abortion
At the third and final debate last Wednesday, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump drew a lot of criticism for his medically inaccurate and emotionally charged description of late-term abortion. Trump described a procedure that rips the baby out of the womb in the ninth month of pregnancy — a shocking characterization that medical experts have denounced and refuted as a gross distortion of the procedure. Here’s what he said: If you go with what Hillary is saying, in the ninth month you can take baby and rip the baby out of the womb of the mother just prior to the birth of the baby. Now, you can say tha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Physicians At Teaching Hospitals
In the United States, Medicare pays the salary and fringe benefits of interns and residents in teaching hospitals. This amounts to about $100 thousand per resident every year. Of this amount, the resident is paid about $40-$50 thousand per year in salary. Some of the dollars from Medicare are paid to physicians in charge of training the residents. In addition, several billion dollars is paid to teaching hospitals every year to offset the added costs of training residents. These costs include malpractice coverage for the residents and the added costs generated by inexperienced physicians who have a tendency, it is believ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lengthened Lifespan Demands Focus On Extending Brain Health
Humans can only live so long and we’re close to reaching the natural biological limit, if we haven’t reached it already. That’s what Albert Einstein College of Medicine scientists say in a new report. The report cites data, which strongly suggest the maximum human lifespan of 125 years was attained in the 1990s. And while experts say there is no scientific reason more serious interventions into the biology of aging couldn’t extend the human lifespan, the report says the possibility is essentially constrained by any number of genetic variants. I applaud and wholeheartedly celebrate making improvement...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Knowing Your Triglyceride Number Matters
Many of us can rattle off our latest cholesterol number at the drop of a hat. Keeping an eye on your cholesterol is important but there's another number you also should have memorized - your triglycerides. However, if asked about our triglyceride number, most of us have little to know idea what it is. That's too bad because our triglyceride number reveals quite a bit of how healthy we are or not. The good news is there are many steps we can take to get it in a healthier range starting today. What are triglycerides? Triglycerides (TG) are the most common type of fat in the body and are an important measure of heart health...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Five Ways Reading Can Improve Health and Well-Being
For many of us, there's nothing quite like getting lost in a good book. Reading can transport us to another world, providing escape from life's everyday stresses, at least temporarily. But increasingly, researchers are finding that reading may offer some real benefits for health and well-being. In August, Medical News Today reported on a study published in the journal Social Science & Medicine that claimed reading books could increase lifespan. Led by researchers from Yale University School of Public Health, the study revealed that adults who reported reading books for more than 3 ½ hours per week were 23 percent less...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don't Let A Chronic Health Condition Diminish Your Sex Life
A chronic medical condition not only can bring changes to the normalcy of your everyday life, but it can also bring significant changes to your love life. As in, diminishing a good thing you had going before your health declined. One important aspect of your overall well-being is sexual satisfaction. We are all built and wired to want to have an enjoyable sexual experience but often when we are dealing with a chronic disease or condition, things are just not the same. But bringing up this personal and intimate side of ourselves to our doctor can be difficult. Discussing sexual problems can feel uncomfortable and unless a ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Life-Saving Question: Are My Arteries Calcified?
I am returning from a conference on heart attack and stroke prevention and was reviewing some of my notes on the goal of earlier diagnosis and treatment of arterial disease, also known as atherosclerosis. One feature of atherosclerosis is that the vast majority of plaques become calcified. Calcified arteries can be identified on most X-ray studies, even routine chest X-rays. CT imaging is particularly good at showing this pathology. Calcified arteries as a sign of atherosclerosis caught the public attention a few years back when whole body CT scans on 4,000 year old mummies demonstrated abnormalities in almost half. So muc...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Introducing The First Sex Toy Designed Specifically For Transgender Men
Buck Angel is one of the most famous transgender men in the world, having built upon his experience in the adult entertainment industry to become an activist, educator and someone who seeks to create visibly for transgender men and masculine-of-center individuals.  Now, Angel is teaming up with Perfect Fit Brand to release the first sex toy designed to specifically meet the needs of transgender men. Called the Buck Off, the product stems from multiple conversations between Angel and the company about how trans men have historically had to adapt sex toys intended for cisgender people to meet their needs. “Talkin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news