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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post

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Total 340 results found since Jan 2013.

World Stroke Day Is A Great Time To Take On The No. 2 Killer Around The Globe
While stroke is often considered something that happens to the elderly, that wasn’t the case with Dr. Biller’s family: His
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Black Women Are Suffering From Alzheimer ' s Disease And Nobody ’s Talking About It
Black Americans are twice as likely to develop dementia -- more so if they're from "the stroke belt."
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Being Born In U.S. ‘Stroke Belt’ Tied To Higher Risk Of Dementia
Black people in the analysis were almost 10 times more likely to have been born in one of the stroke belt states.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What ' s Bell ' s Palsy? Breaking Down Angelina Jolie ' s Health Condition
The signs are very similar to a stroke.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breast-Feeding May Lower Women ' s Risk Of Heart Attack, Stroke
Breast-feeding may literally be good for the heart.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep Deprivation Is Killing You (And Making You Fat In The Process)
The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding Aphasia After Brain Injury
June is National Aphasia Awareness Month, and I wanted to share some of what I have learned on my journey through aphasia after brain injury. According to Wikipedia, the term aphasia implies that one or more communication modalities in the brain have been damaged—and are therefore functioning incorrectly. The difficulties for people with aphasia can range from occasional trouble finding words to losing the ability to speak, read, or write; their intelligence, however, is unaffected. Since no two brain injuries are ever the same, the way aphasia affects one person can vary greatly from the next person. In my own expe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Medical Emergency Of Otto Warmbier
All that the doctors who treated Cincinnati, Ohio resident Otto Warmbier knew is what they had seen or maybe read in the news. They knew he had just been released on June 13 from imprisonment in North Korea where he had been held by for more than 17 months. He had been sentenced in March 2016 to 15 years of hard labor for allegedly removing a propaganda poster from a wall at a Pyongyang hotel where he had been staying. The University of Virginia honors student had been visiting the authoritarian state during a five-day trip with a group called Young Pioneer Tours, which is a group out of China – an important note. Ot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Model With Rare Genetic Disorder Is A Brilliant Example Of Inclusion
This world is a diverse one, so it’s refreshing when the fashion industry reflects that reality. And Seattle-based model Melanie Gaydos is hoping to add to that effort. Gaydos, 28, was born with ectodermal dysplasia, a genetic disorder that can interfere with the proper growth of the hair, nails, teeth, skin and glands. Her involvement in the fashion community is helping people like her to see a place for them in the highly stylized world of modeling. A post shared by Melanie Gaydos (@melaniegaydos) on May 17, 2017 at 5:12pm PDT Fewer than 200,000 people in the United States experience the rare condition,&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Is What Heat Stroke Does To Your Body
Temperatures were in the 100s when Vanessa Dunn, a 29-year-old Los Angeles-based makeup artist, was driving back home to California from Virginia last summer. After hours on the road and drinking limited water, she was struck by a severe case of dehydration and heat stroke. ”I wasn’t drinking enough water because I didn’t want to stop to pee,” she says. When she finally pulled over for the night she felt light-headed, and she couldn’t keep food down when she tried to eat. She even threw up blood. ”I was in incredible pain, and dizzy,” she says. “[I went] to the ER, turned out...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Lessons Learned In The World Of Eldercare
I was ill prepared for my mother’s decline. She lived alone until she was 96 and refused to let me get her home health care help. My husband and I did everything we could so she could live comfortably at home. And then she fell. It wasn’t the first time, or the last time, but it was the fall that changed everything. Statistics show one fourth of Americans over 65 fall each year and the results can be devastating and life changing. Women, often with kids and lives of their own, become the primary caregivers and decision-makers when a parent has an accident. My mom―so strong-minded, stubborn and commanding―co...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chris Cornell: When Suicide Doesn't Make Sense
By Julie A. Fast Sometimes, people commit suicide and it does make some sense. It’s scary and upsets our world, but on a basic level we think we understand. The suicide of Robin Williams comes to mind. He had a history of depression and his health was failing. Oh how we all wish he could have found more help, but I don’t think it was as much surprising as it was devastating and sad for the millions who loved him when he died. Then there are suicides that make no sense. They don’t fit in the current life of the person or fit what the person is actually saying about life in public. The partner or other love...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Do We Choose To Survive After Tragedy?
Why did my brother warn me against reading this book? It’s so good! I thought to myself, as I quickly devoured the pages of JoJo Moyes bestseller titled Me Before You. It was an uplifting tale about a young man who rediscovers love and laughter after a devastating spinal cord injury left him in a dangerous pool of depression. Finding myself at times in my own, albeit more shallow, pool of depression, I knew this story was exactly what I needed to remind me that I could find meaning in my life after my stroke. As I continued reading, anticipating the feel-good happy ending with a girl saving the boy's life with the power ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

African American And High-Risk? 4 Ways To Prevent A Deadly Stroke
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Segregated Neighborhoods May Influence Blood Pressure
(Reuters Health) - African-Americans who move from segregated neighborhoods to more racially diverse communities might experience improvements in their blood pressure, a U.S. study suggests. When researchers looked at the “top number” known as systolic blood pressure - the pressure blood exerts against artery walls when the heart beats - they found moving away from segregated neighborhoods mattered. Relocating to less segregated communities was associated with average decreases of 1.2 to 1.3 mmHG (millimeters of mercury) in systolic blood pressure. “At the population level, a reduction of this magnitude i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lori’s Stroke Required Help From Doctors An Hour Away. Telemedicine Provided It.
Editor’s note: Our previous stories this American Stroke Month featured warning signs heeded and missed. Today we shift gears to showcase a textbook response to a stroke, including the crucial role of telestroke, a way for experts at another facility to help care for a patient via a webcam-type connection. The CHRONIC Care Act, which includes a provision to require Medicare to cover telestroke, will be discussed Tuesday during a hearing of the Senate Finance Committee. Lori Hoopingarner savored her occasional weekend getaway. Between running her financial advising company, raising a 10-year-old daughter and 6-year-old s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Teen's Powerful Post Shows How Depression Can Be Crippling
A Facebook post that candidly depicts what it’s really like to live with a mental health condition has gone viral. Katelyn Marie Todd, a 17-year-old with depression, uploaded a photo of herself brushing her hair on the social media site recently. It was accompanied by a heartbreaking post that opened with one simple line: “I brushed my hair today.” Hair brushing may seem like part of a daily routine, but for Todd it was a major accomplishment. She goes on to explain in her post that this is the first time she has used a comb in four weeks due to her depression. “It was matted and twisted together. I...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sorry, Cheese Is Still Not Great For Your Heart
The internet went wild this week over a new study that suggests eating dairy products like cheese might be healthier than we thought. Headlines like “Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds” were published multiple times. But those reactions are oversimplified and the actual research should be taken with a heavy dose of skepticism, according to experts. “I rolled my eyes at this study,” Christopher Gardner, a nutrition scientist at Stanford University, told HuffPost. Not only is the report funded by organizations associated with the dairy industry, the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How The GOP's Health Plan Shifts The Burden To Family Caregivers
There are two words missing in the 100-plus pages of the American Health Care Act, which narrowly passed the House on Thursday without a single Democratic vote: “family caregivers.” It’s a shame, because the trickle-down effects of the bill ― should it pass the Senate ― would swell the ranks of the nation’s 43.5 million unpaid and untrained family members who sacrifice portions of their own lives and livelihoods to spare their loved ones being kicked to the curb. Many aspects of the Obamacare repeal uniquely target older Americans. But there’s one in particular that threatens to ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prince Philip's Retirement Shocker Isn't All That Shocking
The Duke of Edinburgh plans to retire from his royal duties this autumn, Buckingham Palace announced Thursday morning, ending a night of speculation and worry that the palace was about to share news of far more gravitas. So yes, at age 95, Prince Philip is retiring. He spent 110 days of the past year attending official royal events, which makes him the fifth-busiest member of the royal family, according to Court Circular listings and as reported by the BBC. And he will continue to support the queen. But as far as making appearances on his own, well, he’s stepping back. He has no health issues beyond those a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Donald Trump Thinks Exercise Is Bad For You
Nothing is safe from alternative facts ― even exercise. According to Donald Trump, physical fitness is useless. As the Washington Post’s Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher wrote in their new book, Trump Revealed, Trump believes a sweat session actually does more harm than good: After college, after Trump mostly gave up his personal athletic interests, he came to view time spent playing sports as time wasted. Trump believed the human body was like a battery, with a finite amount of energy, which exercise only depleted. So he didn’t work out. The book also states that when Trump learned that one of his...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

F.A.S.T. Thinking Helped Lane Save His Mom
Editor’s note: Stroke awareness is always important, and there’s extra emphasis on spreading the word in May, which is American Stroke Month. For instance, a survey released Monday showed that one-third of of U.S. adults have had symptoms consistent with a mini-stroke, but only 3 percent called 911 for help. Yet while facts and statistics make the point quite persuasively, the message is perhaps best told through the story of Lane and Flo Matte. Flo Matte is a Friday morning regular at the Impressions Hair Salon in Moss Bluff, Louisiana. It’s a great chance to get her hair done and to catch up on all the hap...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Patients We Do Not See
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Air Pollution Gets Into The Bloodstream And Damages The Heart
Inhaled nanoparticles like those pumped out in vehicle exhausts can work their way through the lungs and into the bloodstream where they can raise the risk of heart attack and stroke, scientists said on Wednesday. In experiments using harmless ultra-fine particles of gold, the scientists were able for the first time to track how such nanoparticles are breathed in, pass through the lungs and then gain access to the blood. Most worryingly, the researchers said at a briefing in London, the nanoparticles tend to build up in damaged blood vessels of people who already suffer from coronary heart disease – the condition tha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 38 Most Inspiring Quotes I Know
No one can deny the power of a good quote. They motivate and inspire us to be our best. Here are 38 of my absolute favorites: 1. “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the water to create many ripples.” -Mother Teresa 2. “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” -Maya Angelou 3. “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” -Henry Ford 4. “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.&rdq...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Poor Sleep Hygiene Is Killing You And Your Career
The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mental Illness Is On The Rise But Access To Care Keeps Dwindling
More Americans than ever before are experiencing mental health problems, yet access to treatment for those issues is becoming more difficult to receive, a new study has found. A new analysis of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Health Interview Survey shows that serious psychological distress, or SPD, defined as severe sadness and depressive symptoms that interfere with a person’s physical wellbeing, is on the rise just as resources for mental health treatment are declining.  Researchers from NYU’s Langone Medical Center analyzed almost a decade’s worth of data...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Health And Beauty Benefits Of Green Vegetables
For Allure, by Ramona Emerson. The other day, my mother asked if we should have waffles for breakfast, and my response shocked even me: “What if we had a salad?” In the weeks since Allure asked me to write about leafy greens, I’ve changed. Once a kale agnostic, I’m now a Devout Kale Orthodox. The kind of person who eats spinach for breakfast and offers unsolicited advice to strangers in line at the salad bar: “You know, romaine is actually healthier than arugula.” (I know, spoiler alert. Just sit tight for a minute.) All the Good They’re Doing The more I learned about leafy greens...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Air Pollution Links People Thousands Of Miles Apart In Deadly Ways
Air pollution and its costs travel, which means countries can’t fix this problem alone, according to an article published Thursday in the journal Nature. The researchers looked in particular at how the human costs of ambient air pollution shift between China and the United States and Western Europe because of nature and the economy. On the one hand, air contaminated by fine particulate matter in one country can sicken or kill people in another country. The article said that air pollution that originated in China in 2007 was linked to an estimated 3,100 premature deaths in the United States and Western Europe tha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neurological Diseases Cost The U.S. $800 Billion Each Year
Over 100 million Americans ― close to a third of the total population ― suffer from neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, migraines, epilepsy and spinal cord injury.  These conditions put an enormous financial strain on the health care system, totaling nearly $800 billion in annual costs, according to a new report published in the journal Annals of Neurology. To put that into perspective, the figure exceeds the U.S. military budget by over $100 billion.  That number reflects the total cost of the nine most common neurological diseases, but the total costs related to th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

House Passes Bill To Help Vets With Mental Illness Buy Guns
WASHINGTON ― The House of Representatives passed a bill Thursday to allow thousands of veterans who are disabled or have mental health conditions to buy guns. Under a law signed by President George W. Bush in the wake of a mass shooting at Virginia Tech in 2007, federal agencies such as the Veterans Administration were required to add the names of people deemed “mentally defective” to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, or NICS, to block them from buying weapons. The VA defined such individuals as those who receive monetary benefits, and have a fiduciary because they lack “the mental ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Bizarre Side Effect 1 In 100 People Experience During Sex
For SELF, by Zahra Barnes. As your sexual arousal ramps up on the trippy journey to orgasm, pleasure is probably the only thing on your mind. Unfortunately, for some people, pain interrupts the party. At least one percent of adults experience coital cephalalgia, or “sex headaches,” aka head pain that occurs before, during, or after orgasm. Here’s what you need to know about this condition, which is basically the unpleasant epitome of a buzzkill. Mayo Clinic spotlights two kinds of sex headaches. The first is “a dull ache in the head and neck that intensifies as sexual excitement increases,” a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pot Use Linked To An Increased Risk Of Stroke And Heart Failure
Adults who use marijuana may have an increased risk of stroke and heart failure, according to a new study. The people in the study who used marijuana were 26 percent more likely to have had a stroke at some point in their lives than those who did not use marijuana, the researchers found. The people who used marijuana were also 10 percent more likely to have developed heart failure at some point in their lives, compared with people who did not use marijuana, the researchers found. The new findings suggest that, like many other medications, cannabis may have side effects, and that patients who use marijuana for medical reaso...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Shocking Number Of Deaths May Be Due To Poor Diet
Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes may be due to diet, a new study finds. In 2012, 45 percent of deaths from “cardiometabolic disease” — which includes heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes — were attributable to the foods people ate, according to the study. This conclusion came from a model that the researchers developed that incorporated data from several sources: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which are annual government surveys that provide information on people’s dietary intakes; the National Center for Health Statistics, f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Next Breakthrough In Fighting Heart Disease And Stroke Could Be Found On A Platform In The Cloud
Just a few years ago, your computer files were pretty much limited to the finite amount of memory on your hard drive and could only be accessed from one machine. Then along came cloud computing. Your storage space expanded and so did your access to it. Now you can tap into your cloud-based files anywhere with an internet connection. That quantum leap sure came quickly. Wouldn't it be great for something like that to happen in the fight against heart disease and stroke? On Sunday, my organization - the American Heart Association (AHA) - announced a new collaboration with cloud computing pioneer Amazon Web Services (AWS)...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The 'Other' Stroke
J Mocco, MD, MS Professor and Vice Chair for Education Director, Cerebrovascular Center Residency Program Director Department of Neurological Surgery Mount Sinai Health System Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The 'Other' Stroke A recent patient of mine, 48-year-old "Joe" (not his real name), was eating with his family at an Italian restaurant. Suddenly, he stood up, cursed, and collapsed. They brought him to the hospital, and he could not talk, move, or do anything we asked him to do. It turned out that Joe had suffered the second-most common, but deadliest, form of stroke: intracerebral hemorrhage. When people hear "stroke,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stroke Heroes 2016
The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Puget Sound Division, along with our sponsor Medtronic, congratulates the honorees for this year's Stroke Hero Awards. We had amazing stories sent to us. Thank you to all of you who submitted a nomination. Here are some of the inspiring individuals honored this year as a Stroke Hero. AMY MOORE, Stroke Survivor Amy is described as a truly an inspiring person who has never let her stroke stop her from accomplishing her goals. Her stroke was diagnosed at six months of age and left her legally blind. Amy learned Braille during her first two years of high school an...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I Never Thought Stroke Would Happen to Me
by Myra Wilson, Stroke Survivor On November 3, 2014, I was in nursing school working as a student nurse at a hospital in Seattle. My first sign that something was not quite right was when I was walking through the nursing station and both of my eyes went blurry. I could still see color but I couldn't see letters. It was blurry for about 30 seconds before clearing up again. I was going to lunch and went to give a report to another nurse. The nurse noticed while I was speaking that I slurred my speech. I didn't notice my speech was slurred at all. It was at that time that I experienced a sudden sharp pain on the right s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Let's Encourage Congress to Improve Stroke Care FAST
She thought she was choking. It was June of her first year as a member of the Ohio House of Representatives. Joyce Beatty had just returned to her office following a luncheon when she felt her throat shut down. She couldn't swallow, couldn't talk. Couldn't cry for help. As she reached for water, her left side went numb. She collapsed. Someone called 911, thinking it was a heart attack. It was a stroke. Specifically, a brain stem stroke. The brain stem is a precarious spot -- a half-inch wide area that controls basic activities like consciousness, blood pressure and breathing. A stroke there could harm any of those functio...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

To Have (Or Maybe Not Have) a Stroke
"You're not leaving here with your blood pressure that high," the doctor said. It was 189 over something equally ridiculous. It was not interested in coming down. Finally she said, "Okay, pick up this prescription on your way out and take it the minute you get home." Vividly running through my head were images of my mother, who suffered a series of strokes that eventually killed her in her 70th year. Plus images of assorted aunts and others who suffered debilitating strokes and often early deaths. "But . . . but," I said to the doctor, as I have repeatedly said since my carefree youth; "I don't have high blood pressure. My...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When Stroke Happens... at Age 27
Ever wonder what it's like to experience a stroke? Avid runner Emily Welbourn blogs about the day she had a stroke while running a race. At the sound of the starting gun, I charge forward with the other runners selected from around the world. In spite of being at peak physical health, I slowly realize my pace isn't sustainable. The one-mile marker is now ahead, I've got this. Just keep moving. Suddenly I am stabbed above the eyebrow...but no one is within arm's reach. Blindsided, I squeeze my eyes shut for a moment to tamper the pain, and the invisible knife is dragged across the top of my head down to my neck. Never i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to Learn the Warning Signs of a Stroke F.A.S.T
What if singing a song or rapping lyrics could give someone the power to spot stroke signs and take action? And what if sharing that song could spread power all around the world? Would you use it to save lives? Imagine the impact it could have. Well the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) has partnered with me and David Augustine, aka Dee-1, a former teacher and now an up and coming hip hop artist, to do just that -- spread the word about stroke warning signs through music. Our version of the song includes a music video that will bring life to the letters F.A.S.T.! Although we had plenty of...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

"I Had A Stroke at 38 Years Old"
How one woman turned a life-changing event into an opportunity to thrive. As told to Kristin Canning By Kristin Canning, SELF (Photo: Courtesy of Merideth Gilmor) I wasn't supposed to have a stroke. I was 38 years old, a mom in "perfect" health. I run my own pro-athlete public relations firm, so I have to stay on pace with the likes of Maria Sharapova, Cam Newton and Colin Kaepernick. I was under stress, sure, but I was happy, enjoying my crazy, packed days. It happened about a year ago. One of my best friends was getting married in the Berkshire Mountains, so I flew from Charlotte, North Carolina, where I'd been on busin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Supporting the Women in our Lives: Stroke Prevention
May is Stroke Awareness Month and May 10-16th is National Women's Health Week, making this the perfect time to talk about the special challenges women face related to stroke and how women can reduce their risk and protect their health. Being the mid-Atlantic Regional Health Administrator might make stroke prevention my professional duty, but it's my role as a father, husband, and son to so many special women that makes it my personal responsibility. It's alarming to think that every 4 minutes someone in the United States dies of a stroke -- most of them women. Stroke -- which is sometimes called a brain attack -- happens...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Losing And Finding My Mother After Her Stroke
The air outside a hospital feels especially cool and fresh. The natural light, even if it's gray January light is a blessed relief after the fluorescent tunnels I've been guiding my mother along. We had a funny moment of intimacy in the bathroom, trying to get her urine sample in a cup. It isn't easy: crouching, aiming, approximating where in the space below you the stream will collect. Add a daughter trying to micromanage her mother's urine flow and a line of weak-bladdered patients queuing outside, rolling their eyes and tugging at their waistbands and you have all the ingredients of a Mike and Elaine sketch. Sometimes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stroke Down to Fifth-Leading Killer in U.S. -- Here's What the Statistical Change Really Means
In the 1970s, Joseph Broderick was a resident at the Mayo Clinic in need of a focus for his fellowship. He decided to give stroke research a try. Part of the lure was all the unanswered questions, like: Who is most likely to have a stroke? Why do they have it when others seemingly like them don't? Is stroke getting more or less common? What can be done to prevent it? Another part of the lure was a landmark study on the frequency of stroke being done in the hospital's hometown of Rochester, Minnesota. Being part of it meant working for one of the nation's leading stroke researchers at the time, Jack Whisnant. By the mid-...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news