Query: stroke

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Source: Clinical Neurophysiology

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Total 236 results found since Jan 2013.

P5. Acute versus chronic lesion mapping: Methodological considerations from a study of arm motor functions
The method of lesion analysis is a tool widely used in cognitive neuroscience to conduct group studies with stroke patients associating cognitive dysfunctions with brain lesions. Although modern statistical lesion analysis (voxel wise lesion symptom mapping, VLSM) is an established tool there is still a lively debate about the time between stroke onset, neuroimaging and the assessment of cognitive functions. There are several reasons supporting acute/subacute or chronic neuroimaging or functional assessment.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: J. Rennig, H. Planert, H.-O. Karnath Source Type: research

P12. Neural correlates of apraxia in mild dementia of Alzheimer’s disease – A voxel-based morphometry study
Apraxia is a neuropsychological syndrome with the hallmark of impaired imitation and/or pantomiming of gestures and postures despite normal motor function and comprehension. Whereas key brain regions for apraxia in patients with left-hemispheric stroke have been suggested, it is unclear whether similar areas contribute to praxis disturbances observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: A. Johnen, L. Brandstetter, H. Lohmann, T. Duning Source Type: research

P99. Predictors of new cerebral microbleeds in patients with antiplatelet drug therapy
Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are an MRI marker of vascular damage in the brain and are associated with an increased risk for ischemic and especially hemorrhagic stroke. CMBs are known to be more prevalent in patients who take antiplatelet drug therapy, which is commonly used for secondary prevention in patients with ischemic stroke. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to identify patients at high risk for the development of new CMBs under antiplatelet drug therapy.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: K. Menzler, M. Hausdörfer, C. Mayer, M. Belke, A. Gerstner, M. Teepker, R. Werner, H. Hamer, W. Oertel, F. Rosenow, S. Knake Source Type: research

P59. Evaluation of representational deficits in neglect patients – Visual search patterns in two different bed side tests
Early diagnosis of different modalities in neglect after right hemisphere ischemic lesion and subsequent adequate therapy is crucial in regard to the clinical outcome (e.g. Buxbaum et al., 2004). Bed-side tests in the acute phase after stroke usually include only clinical examination and paper based cancellation tests (e.g. Ota search task, Bell‘s Cancellation). Additional testing such as recording of deficit in visual exploration by tracking of eye movements and standardized test for diagnosis of representational neglect have so far been only conducted in as non-bed-side tests in sub-acute or chronic stages (Isihai et al., 1989).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: S. Höfer, K. Nitschke, T. Bormann, C. Weiller, R. Umarova, L.-A. Beume Source Type: research

P149. Suppression of LTP-like associative plasticity in the human SMA–M1 network by simultaneous tDCS
Excitability and connectivity in the human motor network comprising the supplementary motor area (SMA) and primary motor cortex (M1) are important for voluntary movement generation and rehabilitation of lost motor function after stroke. Previously, we demonstrated that paired associative stimulation of SMA and M1 (SMA–M1-PAS) by dual coil transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may induce LTP-like plasticity in this network (Arai et al., 2011. J Neurosci 31:15376–83). Here, we tested the influence of simultaneous modulation of general network excitability by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on associative...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: H. Faber, C. Zipser, J. Tünnerhoff, F. Müller-Dahlhaus, U. Ziemann Source Type: research

P153. Correlation of cortical inhibition and motor performance after mental training with the hand in patients after stroke
This study explored if mental practice targeting the hand modulates cortical excitability and improves function of the affected hand. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was used to measure changes in the duration of the cortical Silent Period (cSP) and to analyze the amplitudes of motor evoked potentials (MEPs).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: I. Büsching, A. Sehle, J. Liepert Source Type: research

P174. Effects of left and right brain damage on anticipatory motor behavior during grasping and lifting with the ipsilesional hand
Behavioral studies in patients with left and right brain damage revealed the specialized function of both hemispheres in motor control. Recently, we investigated anticipatory grip force control in patients with stroke affecting the left or the right hemisphere during object lifting with the ipsilesional non-paretic hand. We found imprecise anticipation of grip force to the weight of everyday objects (like a carton with milk or a package of paper tissues) in patients with left brain damage while patients with right brain damage performed closer to normal.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: J. Hermsdörfer, M. Bienkiewicz, N. Rohrbach, G. Buckingham Source Type: research

P186. Correlates to influence user performance in a hand motor rehabilitation task
The power of oscillatory EEG signal components has been related to attention or mental workload. Thus it may allow to decode and track mental states related to the performance of a user on a specific task. In motor rehabilitation after stroke, knowledge about suitable or impeding brain states may be informative enough to causally influence the training performance. A prerequisite for such real-time manipulation is the ability to decode ongoing EEG signals. Solutions are provided by the field of Brain–Computer Interface (BCI) systems.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 5, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: S. Castaño-Candamil, A. Meinel, J. Reis, M. Tangermann Source Type: research

Stimulation site and phase modulation of the withdrawal reflex during gait initiation
Muscular activity, neural mechanisms, and biomechanical forces are highly integrated in the gait initiation process (GIP) (Mann et al., 1979). In this complex process, forces generated by the legs serve to limit postural perturbations and provide forward propulsion. However, in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) or stroke, this process is sometimes disrupted (Hesse et al., 1997; Hass et al., 2005). In particular, people who suffered a stroke often have problems generating force in the starting leg and difficulties to load the limbs symmetrically during gait initiation (Brunt et al., 1995).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 14, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Miguel A. Richard, Erika G. Spaich, Mariano Serrao, Ole K. Andersen Source Type: research

33. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring of brain perfusion during cardiac surgery in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid stenosis
Asymptomatic internal carotid (ICA) stenosis is one of documented risk factors of perioperative ischemic stroke (IS) in cardiac surgery. There is no strict consensus in benefit of prophylactic carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in asymptomatic ICA stenosis to reduce intraoperative IS. Median somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) is reliable tool for intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) of brain perfusion during CEA.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 13, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: S. Ostrý, R. Tesařík, M. Leitgeb Source Type: research

Resting-state sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) power predicts the ability to up-regulate SMR in an EEG-instrumental conditioning paradigm
During instrumental conditioning of EEG activity (EEG-IC), participants receive feedback of a specific aspect of their brain signals (Lubar et al., 1995), e.g. feedback on the power of a certain frequency band. Desired patterns of EEG activity are rewarded by visual or auditory stimuli, thus enabling participants to modulate their brain activity by means of instrumental conditioning. EEG-IC training has been used to treat patients with disorders such as epilepsy (Sterman and Egner, 2006), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Arns et al., 2009) and stroke (Doppelmayr et al., 2007), as well as in healthy participants (H...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 6, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Johanna Louise Reichert, Silvia Erika Kober, Christa Neuper, Guilherme Wood Source Type: research

Behaviour of medial gastrocnemius motor units during postural reactions to external perturbations after stroke
The ankle plantarflexors are the main muscles controlling standing balance during anteriorly-directed sways (Di Giulio et al., 2009; Tokuno et al., 2007); this is often referred to as the “ankle strategy” (Winter et al., 1998). The medial gastrocnemius muscle has been suggested to be particularly active with anterior sways of increased magnitude (Di Giulio et al., 2009; Vieira et al., 2012) and gastrocnemius muscles have been shown to modulate with centre of mass (COM) velocity and anterior-posterior centre of pressure (APCOP) velocity and excursion during quiet stance (Gatev et al., 1999; Masani et al., 2003; Vieira et al., 2012).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - December 29, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: C.L. Pollock, T.D. Ivanova, M.A. Hunt, S.J. Garland Source Type: research

Behavior of medial gastrocnemius motor units during postural reactions to external perturbations after stroke
The ankle plantar flexors are the main muscles controlling standing balance during anteriorly-directed sways (Di Giulio et al., 2009; Tokuno et al., 2007); this is often referred to as the “ankle strategy” (Winter et al., 1998). The medial gastrocnemius muscle has been suggested to be particularly active with anterior sways of increased magnitude (Di Giulio et al., 2009; Vieira et al., 2012) and gastrocnemius muscles have been shown to modulate with centre of mass (COM) velocity and anterior–posterior centre of pressure (APCOP) velocity and excursion during quiet stance (Gatev et al., 1999; Masani et al., 2003; Vieira et al., 2012).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - December 29, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: C.L. Pollock, T.D. Ivanova, M.A. Hunt, S.J. Garland Source Type: research

87. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of motor cortex does not ameliorates spasticity in multiple sclerosis
Spasticity is a common disorder and a major cause of a long-term disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCs) is a potential tool to improve motor deficits in several neurological disease and, recently, it has been proposed as effective in decreasing spasticity after stroke. To assess whether anodal tDCS is effective in modulating lower limb spasticity in MS patients. We performed a single-centre randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study to investigate efficacy of anodal vs sham tDCs in 20 relapsing-remitting MS patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - December 13, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: R. Iodice, F. Manganelli, L. Ruggiero, R. Dubbioso, L. Santoro Source Type: research

The P300 in middle cerebral artery strokes or hemorrhages: Outcome predictions and source localization
Stroke is the leading cause of disability and is the third leading cause of death worldwide (Murray and Lopez, 1997). According to the World Health Organisation, a total of 15 million people suffer a stroke each year. Strokes can principally be classified into two main categories, ischemic and hemorrhagic (Donnan et al., 2008). 85% of all strokes are of ischemic origin (Qureshi et al., 2001) and most commonly occur within the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). The MCA supplies the lateral portion of the cerebral cortex (about 60–70% of the hemisphere).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - November 1, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Mana R. Ehlers, Carmen López Herrero, Andreas Kastrup, Helmut Hildebrandt Source Type: research

The P300 in middle cerebral artery strokes or hemorrhages: outcome predictions and source localisation
Stroke is the leading cause of disability and is the third leading cause of death worldwide (Murray and Lopez, 1997). According to the World Health Organisation, a total of 15 million people suffer a stroke each year. Strokes can principally be classified into two main categories, ischemic and hemorrhagic (Donnan et al., 2008). 85 % of all strokes are of ischemic origin (Qureshi et al., 2001) and most commonly occur within the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). The MCA supplies the lateral portion of the cerebral cortex (about 60 % - 70 % of the hemisphere).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - November 1, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Mana R. Ehlers, Carmen López Herrero, Andreas Kastrup, Helmut Hildebrandt Source Type: research

Timing of motor cortical stimulation during planar robotic training differentially impacts neuroplasticity in older adults
Neurorehabilitation efforts have focused on intense structured interventions to promote neuroplasticity because stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability world-wide. Robotic rehabilitation devices assist massed practice of upper extremity movement at high repetition rates (Lo et al., 2010; Conroy et al., 2011). They can also be used to change the learning environment, e.g., provide assistance or resistance to the motor task or train new mappings for movement to environmental effect (Krebs et al., 1998; Stein et al., 2004; MacClellan et al., 2005).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 15, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Crystal L. Massie, Shailesh S. Kantak, Priya Narayanan, George F. Wittenberg Source Type: research

Activity-dependent brain stimulation and robot-assisted movements for use-dependent plasticity
Functional restoration after stroke is an ongoing challenge even with intensive rehabilitation programs. In addition to traditional rehabilitation training, brain stimulation techniques have been explored to increase the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex and to augment the response to afferent input during motor exercises (Edwardson et al., 2013). Recent approaches examined single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied concurrently with voluntary movements for more specific and efficacious plasticity induction (Bütefisch et al., 2004, 2011; Thabit et al., 2010).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 14, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alireza Gharabaghi Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Stroke gait rehabilitation: is load perception a first step towards load control?
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 9, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jacques Duysens, Firas Massaad Source Type: research

Startling acoustic stimuli can evoke fast hand extension movements in stroke survivors
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - June 18, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Claire Fletcher Honeycutt, Ursina Andrea Tresch, Eric Jon Perreault Source Type: research

A brain–computer interface for single-trial detection of gait initiation from movement related cortical potentials
Neurological conditions, such as stroke, spinal cord injury or Parkinson’s disease, often result in impaired motor control and consequent difficulty of the patient to perform activities of daily living. One of the goals of rehabilitation is to promote the patient’s independency with the aim of restoring the loss of movement ability.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - May 19, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ning Jiang, Leonardo Gizzi, Natalie Mrachacz-Kersting, Kim Dremstrup, Dario Farina Source Type: research

An automated and fast approach to detect single-trial visual evoked potentials with application to brain–computer interface
Brain–computer interface (BCI) is an emerging technology which can establish a pathway between the human brain and computers through recording and decoding brain activity (Wolpaw et al., 2002). Since the control of BCI system is directly based on the recorded brain activity without the involvement of neuromuscular system, it allows people who suffer from motor dysfunction or impairment (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brainstem stroke, and spinal cord injury) to communicate with the external world or control prosthesis (Vaughan et al., 2003).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - April 14, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Yiheng Tu, Yeung Sam Hung, Li Hu, Gan Huang, Yong Hu, Zhiguo Zhang Source Type: research

Activation deficit correlates with weakness in chronic stroke: Evidence from evoked and voluntary EMG recordings
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - April 1, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Sheng Li, Jie Liu, Minal Bhadane, Ping Zhou, W. Zev Rymer Source Type: research

A region-based two-step P300-based brain–computer interface for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
The brain–computer interface (BCI) or brain–machine interface (BMI) is an interface technology that enables communication with others and control of the environment or of a prosthesis without any muscle movement (Wolpaw et al., 2002; Birbaumer and Cohen, 2007; Daly and Wolpaw, 2008). In this decade, the use of BCI technology has become widespread, mainly for preclinical research, due to technical and mechanical improvements, and new technology been designed to help individuals with severe neurological disabilities, especially motor difficulties such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinal cord injury (SCI), and cerebral stroke.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - March 26, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Shiro Ikegami, Kouji Takano, Kiyohiko Kondo, Naokatsu Saeki, Kenji Kansaku Source Type: research

Changes in diffusion tensor tractographic findings associated with constraint-induced movement therapy in young children with cerebral palsy
Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) involves the application of constraint applied to the unimpaired upper limb coupled with intensive training of unimanual skills in the hemiplegic arm (Hoare et al., 2007). CIMT has been studied extensively and found to be effective in the treatment of adult hemiparetic stroke (Sirtori et al., 2009). Several randomized clinical trials performed on children with cerebral palsy (CP) also demonstrated immediate gain in the frequency of use and improved movement efficacy of the impaired upper limb (Deppe et al., 2013; Hoare et al., 2007; Rostami and Malamiri, 2012).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - March 20, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Jeong-Yi Kwon, Won Hyuk Chang, Hyun Jung Chang, Sook-Hee Yi, Min-Young Kim, Eun-Hye Kim, Yun-Hee Kim Source Type: research

Asymmetries in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in chronic stroke survivors with spastic hypertonia: Evidence for a vestibulospinal role
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - March 11, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Derek M. Miller, Cliff S. Klein, Nina L. Suresh, William Z. Rymer Source Type: research

How do the physiology and transcallosal effects of the unaffected hemisphere change during inpatient rehabilitation after stroke?
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 27, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: George F. Wittenberg, Michael A. Dimyan Source Type: research

Longitudinal changes of motor cortical excitability and transcallosal inhibition after subcortical stroke
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 27, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Utako Takechi, Kaoru Matsunaga, Ryoji Nakanishi, Hiroaki Yamanaga, Nobuki Murayama, Kosuke Mafune, Sadatoshi Tsuji Source Type: research

Reply to “The effects of functional electrical stimulation on upper extremity function and cortical plasticity in chronic stroke patients”
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 10, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Yukihiro Hara Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Neurorehabilitation: From sensorimotor adaptation to motor learning, or the opposite?
In a recent editorial, Vasudevan (2014) argued that amplifying movement errors through sensorimotor adaptation can be an interesting way to improve walking post-stroke and more generally to develop new approach in neurorehabilitation. I would like to comment further this idea and to raise some key issues that should be addressed to complete this discussion.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 5, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: François Bonnetblanc Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

The effects of functional electrical stimulation on upper-extremity function and cortical plasticity in chronic stroke patients
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - January 22, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Rebeca Boltes Cecatto Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Deficits in startle-evoked arm movements increase with impairment following stroke
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - January 10, 2014 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Claire Fletcher Honeycutt, Eric Jon Perreault Tags: Movement, Motor Control and Movement Disorders Source Type: research