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Total 236 results found since Jan 2013.

Non-invasive brain stimulation in the modulation of cerebral blood flow after stroke: a systematic review of Transcranial Doppler studies
NIBS has been successfully explored as a biomarker and therapeutic adjunct for functional recovery after stroke. rTMS and tDCS are two such promising neuromodulatory techniques that have been widely investigated to prime the motor areas of the brain in combination with task-specific practice (Bastani et al., 2012, Hsu et al., 2012, Jodie et al., 2015, Le et al., 2014). Although these techniques have demonstrated modest efficacy, clinical translation is still limited as the underlying physiological mechanisms are not completely understood, nor is the inter-individual variability associated with these techniques resolved (L ...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - October 24, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Pooja C Iyer, Sangeetha Madhavan Source Type: research

Activation of elbow extensors during passive stretch of flexors in patients with post-stroke spasticity
Spasticity affects up to 40% of individuals after stroke (Wissel et al., 2013). The most widely accepted definition of spasticity describes it as one component of a complex motor system disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in stretch reflex excitability associated with exaggerated tendon jerks (Lance, 1980).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 24, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Mindy F. Levin, John M. Solomon, Akash Shah, Andr éanne K. Blanchette, Anatol G. Feldman Source Type: research

P28. The functional role of the anterior intraparietal sulcus for recovery of hand function in chronic stroke patients – A combined fMRI-TMS study
After stroke, neuroimaging studies frequently show increased activation of contralesional regions such as the primary motor cortex (M1) and the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) during movements of the impaired hand (Rehme et al., 2012). There is evidence that these areas may adopt either supportive or disturbing implications for motor control, depending on multiple factors, such as age, stroke severity, and lesion location (Di Pino et al., 2014). Importantly, previous research has mainly focused on investigating this question in the contralesional M1, while other areas involved in motor control, such as the aIPS have o...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: F. Lange, L. Hensel, C. Tscherpel, C. Grefkes Source Type: research

PB10. Apraxic deficits in sub-acute right hemisphere stroke result from deficient allo-centric visuo-spatial processing
While visuo-spatial deficits are well characterized cognitive sequelae of right hemisphere (RH) stroke, apraxic deficits in RH stroke remain poorly understood. Likewise, very little is known about the association between apraxic and visuo-spatial deficits in RH stroke or about the putative common or differential pathophysiology underlying these deficits.Therefore, we examined the behavioral and lesion patterns of apraxic deficits (pantomime of object use and bucco-facial imitation) and visuo-spatial deficits (line bisection and letter cancellation tasks) in 50 sub-acute RH stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: S.D. Ubben, G.R. Fink, S. Kaesberg, E. Kalbe, J. Kessler, S. Vossel, P.H. Weiss Source Type: research

PB3. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation in neurointensive care patients suffering from severe post-stroke dysphagia – Post stimulation increase of salivary substance P level may indicate treatment success
Dysphagia is one of the most important and prognostically relevant complications of acute stroke. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation (PES) is a treatment device that enhances cortical reorganization for the restoration of swallowing function after cerebral injury. Furthermore, it was shown that PES leads to a temporary increase of Substance P (SP) level in saliva but not serum in healthy adults. The neuropeptide SP likely acts as a neurotransmitter in the pharyngeal mucosa and enhances the swallow and cough reflex.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: P. Muhle, S. Suntrup-Krueger, S. Bittner, T. Ruck, I. Claus, T. Marian, J.B. Schr öder, J. Minnerup, T. Warnecke, S.G. Meuth, R. Dziewas Source Type: research

FV12. Development of a diagnostic index test for stroke as a cause of vertigo, dizziness and imbalance in the emergency room: First results from the prospective EMVERT trial
Identifying stroke as a cause of acute vertigo, dizziness and imbalance in the emergency room is still a clinical challenge. The aim of the EMVERT trial was to develop a diagnostic index test to identify patients with the high risk to have a stroke as the cause of the balance symptoms.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: A. Zwergal, K. M öhwald, H. Hadzhikolev, S. Bardins, T. Brandt, M. Dieterich, K. Jahn Source Type: research

FV5. Tapping into neural resources of verbal communication may help overcome difficulties in speech-motor planning after stroke
Decades of research highlight the importance of formulaic expressions in everyday spoken language. Utterances of this linguistic category are, by definition, fixed in form and embedded in communicative-pragmatic context (e.g., ‘Thank you,’ ‘How are you?’ or ‘I’m fine’). A growing body of neuroscience evidence suggests that formulaic expressions engage, in particular, right-hemisphere cortical and bilateral subcortical neural networks (cf. Stahl and Van Lancker Sidtis, 2015). This may explain why left-hemisph ere stroke patients often suffer from impaired speech-motor planning, while they are still able to com...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: B. Stahl, A. Fl öel, B. Amelew, F. Regenbrecht, S.A. Kotz Source Type: research

P60. Direct and long term influence of cardiovascular training on cognition in subacute stroke patients
Rehabilitation of cognitive deficits has been voted ‘#1 research priority’ for patients suffering from stroke (Saunders et al., 2014). Aerobic fitness training may modulate cognitive performance either by enhancing neuroplasticity or by increasing brain oxygenation. The majority of studies in this area have focused on motor function; its effect o n cognitive performance is not well understood yet. The current study therefore aims to evaluate the influence of aerobic fitness intervention on cognitive functions in subacute stroke patients, and tries to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this effect.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: T. Rackoll, A. Nave, U. Grittner, H. Mousa, K. Villringer, M. Ebinger, A. Fl öel Source Type: research

Quantitative EEG and functional outcome following acute ischemic stroke
Stroke is a leading cause of disability and mortality worldwide, and despite advances in disease prevention, acute treatment and rehabilitation, global stroke burden is expected to rise in the future (Feigin et al. 2017). Early post-stroke prognostication is essential both in the short-term (f. ex. in guiding treatment strategies) and in the long-term (to aid in rehabilitation management, in order to improve recovery and minimize disability). Predictors of stroke disability and associate death consistently include age and clinical / imaging related stroke severity (Adams et al.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - June 15, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Carla Bentes, Ana Rita Peralta, Pedro Viana, Hugo Martins, Carlos Morgado, Carlos Casimiro, Ana Catarina Franco, Ana Catarina Fonseca, Ruth Geraldes, Patr ícia Canhão, Teresa Pinho e Melo, Teresa Paiva, José M Ferro Source Type: research

Diagnostic Value of Somatosensory Evoked Potential Changes During Carotid Endarterectomy for 30-Day Perioperative Stroke
Carotid Endarterectomy (CEA) is a standard surgical treatment in the secondary prevention of stroke performed in patients with both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (CS)(Malcharek et al. 2013), (Pennekamp et al. 2011), (Pulli et al. 2002), (Reinert et al. 2012). CEA is shown to benefit symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, when compared to medical management alone in the short term and long term due to decreased stroke. (Akhmedov et al. 2013), (Baton et al. 2007), (Floriani et al. 1989), (Hartmann et al.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - June 13, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Rajiv P. Reddy, Indraneel S. Brahme, Tejas Karnati, Jeffrey Balzer, Donald J. Crammond, Katherine Anetakis, Parthasarathy D. Thirumala Source Type: research

O-2-17. Influence of different types of orthoses on muscle synergy control during gait in stroke patients with hemiparesis
The purpose of this study was to verify the influence of lower limb orthoses on muscle synergy control during gait in stroke patients with hemiparesis. In four subjects with acute stroke, surface EMG signals from eight muscles of the paretic lower limb were measured during gait in two conditions (ankle foot orthosis; AFO or knee ankle foot orthosis; KAFO). The number of modules, muscle weightings and activation timing profile of each module were analyzed using non-negative matrix factorization. In two subjects (Fugl Meyer Assessment; FMA  > 20) who walked with mild assistance, three modules were identified during gait ...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - April 26, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Masanori Wakida, Kimihiko Mori, Yuta Chujo, Eiko Hirooka, Gwang-ho Kim, Koji Ohata, Kimitaka Hase Source Type: research

S21-1. A new analysis method using surface electromyography to assess finger function in patients with severe stroke
We have conducted our research into kinesthetic illusions induced by visual stimuli (KiNvis), which are sensations of being in motion that result from watching artificial images of the body part moving. Our previous studies revealed characteristic neural networks related to KiNvis; since then, we have initiated clinical studies adapting KiNvis in patients with stroke. In patients with severe stroke, it is often difficult to measure joint angles, because voluntary movement does not occur or simultaneous contraction of the agonist and antagonist muscles prevent controlled voluntary joint exercise.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - April 26, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Fuminari Kaneko Source Type: research

Stroke causes a transient imbalance of interhemispheric information flow in EEG during Non-REM sleep
Stroke is one of the leading causes of disabilities and represents a major medical and socio-economical burden (Adamson et al., 2004; Global Burden of Disease Study Collaborators, 2015; Ovbiagele et al., 2013). Ischemic strokes account for more than 2/3 of all strokes (Feigin et al., 2009). In the minutes to weeks following the onset of a focal cerebral ischemia, a variety of local but also more distant changes in connectivity occur (Silasi and Murphy, 2014; Xerri et al., 2014). In particular, functional neuroimaging studies have highlighted a “hyperactivity” of the homotopic contralesional region following a unilatera...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - April 17, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Frederic Zubler, Andrea Seiler, Thomas Horvath, Corinne Roth, Silvia Miano, Christian Rummel, Heidemarie Gast, Lino Nobili, Kaspar A. Schindler, Claudio L. Bassetti Source Type: research

O-2-17. Influence of different types of orthoses on muscle synergy control during gait in stroke patients with hemiparesis
The purpose of this study was to verify the influence of lower limb orthoses on muscle synergy control during gait in stroke patients with hemiparesis. In four subjects with acute stroke, surface EMG signals from eight muscles of the paretic lower limb were measured during gait in two conditions (ankle foot orthosis; AFO or knee ankle foot orthosis; KAFO). The number of modules, muscle weightings and activation timing profile of each module were analyzed using non-negative matrix factorization. In two subjects (Fugl Meyer Assessment; FMA  > 20) who walked with mild assistance, three modules were identified during gait ...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - March 30, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Masanori Wakida, Kimihiko Mori, Yuta Chujo, Eiko Hirooka, Gwang-ho Kim, Koji Ohata, Kimitaka Hase Source Type: research

S21-1. A new analysis method using surface electromyography to assess finger function in patients with severe stroke
We have conducted our research into kinesthetic illusions induced by visual stimuli (KiNvis), which are sensations of being in motion that result from watching artificial images of the body part moving. Our previous studies revealed characteristic neural networks related to KiNvis; since then, we have initiated clinical studies adapting KiNvis in patients with stroke. In patients with severe stroke, it is often difficult to measure joint angles, because voluntary movement does not occur or simultaneous contraction of the agonist and antagonist muscles prevent controlled voluntary joint exercise.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - March 30, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Fuminari Kaneko Source Type: research

P06-Cortical somatosensory processing after botulinum toxin therapy in post-stroke spasticity
In movement disorders, neurophysiology and functional MRI demonstrated abnormalities of sensorimotor processing, responding to peripheral botulinum toxin A (BoNT) treatment. We used Modified Ashworth scale (MAS) to assess spasticity and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to study changes in sensorimotor cortical areas after BoNT therapy of post-stroke arm spasticity.Seventeen patients (10 men, 7 women, average age 60.2  years) with post-stroke arm spasticity were treated with BoNT into the affected muscles.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - March 13, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: P. Hlu štík, T. Veverka, P. Hok, P. Otruba, A. Krobot, J. Zapletalová, P. Kaňovský Source Type: research

Symmetry of cortical planning for initiating stepping in sub-acute stroke
After stroke, many people exhibit altered movement patterns making normal performance of balance and walking difficult (Duncan et al., 1992). However, the influence of motor planning on performance of balance and walking post-stroke is not well understood. Motor planning is defined as the integration of sensory afferent information (Ghez et al., 1997), such as limb position and muscle force (Kandel et al., 2000), with a functional goal (Zimmermann et al., 2012) to generate a movement (Peters et al., 2015).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 4, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Sue Peters, Tanya Ivanova, Bimal Lakhani, Lara A Boyd, W Richard Staines, Todd C Handy, S. Jayne Garland Source Type: research

Finger Strength, Individuation, and their Interaction: Relationship to Hand Function and Corticospinal Tract Injury after Stroke
Many activities of daily living require dexterous use of the fingers, such as opening a door, buttoning a shirt, and holding a fork. Such activities often become more effortful and slower after a stroke, and sometimes impossible to achieve with the hemiparetic hand. Thus, approximately 50% of the 700,000 individuals who survive a stroke each year in the U.S. have persistent upper extremity impairment (Dobkin, 1996; Heller et al., 1987; Ma et al., 2014; Warabi et al., 1990). Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms that cause reduced hand function is essential for targeting stroke therapies.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - February 3, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Eric T. Wolbrecht, Justin B. Rowe, Vicky Chan, Morgan L. Ingemanson, Steven C. Cramer, David J. Reinkensmeyer Source Type: research

Interhemispheric motor interactions in hemiparetic children with perinatal stroke: Clinical correlates and effects of neuromodulation therapy
Perinatal ischemic stroke (PS) is the occlusion of arteries or veins that results in cerebral damage between 20 weeks gestation and 28 days of life (Raju, 2007; Nelson and Lynch, 2004). PS is common, occurring in>1:3000 live births, and accounts for most hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) (Kirton and DeVeber, 2013). Children with PS-induced hemiparetic CP typically manifest motor asymmetry and early hand preference in the first 4-6 months of life (Kirton et al., 2010b). How the motor system develops following such early unilateral brain injury is increasingly defined by animal (Martin et al., 2007) and human (Eyre, 2007; Staudt, 2007) studies.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - November 25, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Derek Eng, Ephrem Zewdie, Patrick Ciechanski, Omar Damji, Adam Kirton Source Type: research

Bilateral early activity in the hip flexors associated with Falls in Stroke Survivors: Preliminary evidence from laboratory-induced falls
Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the US with an additional 800,000 incidents occurring each year (CDC, 2012). Falls present a major risk for stroke survivors, 40% of whom experience a serious fall within their first year (Persson et al., 2011). Up to 69% of falls by stroke survivors result in injuries. Despite the importance of the problem, there is surprisingly little information about what factors contribute to falls in stroke survivors. With few exceptions, the literature has focused on relating metrics of post-stroke static balance (where stepping did not occur) and impairment (clinical scores) to fall outc...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - November 20, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dmitrijs Celinskis, Mark D. Grabiner, Claire F. Honeycutt Source Type: research

35. Association of robot-assisted rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation to improve upper limb function in chronic stroke patients
Previous studies suggested that both robotic rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation could produce improvement in chronic stroke patients. It is still unknown whether their combination can produce synergistic effects. We designed a proof-of-principle, double-blinded, semi-randomized, sham-controlled trial to assess the safety and efficacy of this combination.Twenty severe upper limb-impaired chronic stroke patients were randomized to robot-assisted therapy associated with real or sham cTBS, delivered for 10 working days.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - November 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: F. Capone, G. Di Pino, G. Pellegrino, L. Florio, L. Zollo, D. Simonetti, F. Ranieri, N. Brunelli, M. Corbetto, S. Miccinilli, M. Bravi, S. Milighetti, E. Guglielmelli, S. Sterzi, V. Di Lazzaro Source Type: research

26. A randomized controlled cross-over double blind study protocol on THC/CBD oromucosal spray as an add-on therapy for post-stroke spasticity
Understand if cannabinoids (THC:CBD) are useful in reducing post-stroke spasticity using a neurophysiological quantitative measure as primary endpoint.We will recruit 50 patients with spasticity following stroke to take THC:CBD in a double blind placebo-controlled crossover study. Spasticity will be assessed with a numeric rating scale for spasticity, the modified Ashworth scale and with the electromyographic recording of the stretch reflex. The cardiovascular risk will be assessed prior to inclusion.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - November 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: L. Marinelli, M. Balestrino, L. Mori, L. Puce, G. Rosa, L. Giorello, A. Curr à, F. Fattapposta, C. Serrati, C. Gandolfo, G. Abbruzzese, C. Trompetto Source Type: research

Revisiting interhemispheric imbalance in chronic stroke: a tDCS study
The immense burden of stroke-related disability has led to the development of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) as a possible approach to augment neurorehabilitation of the paretic upper limb (Ackerley et al., 2010). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a polarity-dependent neuromodulatory technique that has demonstrated some benefit to motor function at the chronic stage (>6 months) post stroke, but effect sizes have varied (Jacobson et al., 2012; Kang et al., 2015).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - October 28, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alana B McCambridge, James W Stinear, Winston D Byblow Source Type: research

Behavioral and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor skill learning in patients with post-stroke hemiparesis
Skilled actions of daily life such as reaching across a busy table to pick a coffee mug are often performed with accurate, yet fast and efficient arm movements. Such complex skilled actions require optimization of speed and accuracy; and rely on efficient planning and execution (Begliomini et al., 2014; Fang et al., 2015; Orban de Xivry et al., 2017; Stewart et al., 2013). Following a neurological insult such as stroke, skilled arm movements are greatly impaired in the paretic (weaker) arm such that task performance is slow, inaccurate and fragmented (Cirstea et al., 2003; Levin, 1996; Liu et al., 2013; Shaikh et al., 2014...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - October 25, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Shailesh Kantak, Robert McGrath, Nazaneen Zahedi, Dustin Luchmee Source Type: research

Corticomuscular coherence in the acute and subacute phase after stroke
Stroke results from critically reduced blood flow to the brain tissue due to bleeding or obstruction of arteries. Globally, stroke remains a major cause of disability despite advances in preventive treatment and in acute management (Hankey, 2017). The most common impairment caused by stroke is motor disability affecting approximately 80% of the patients, most frequently seen as hemiparesis (Langhorne et al., 2009). Spontaneous recovery may occur in the following weeks and months after stroke and can be facilitated through rehabilitation involving exercise (Maulden et al., 2005).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 22, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Lisbeth Hoejkjaer Larsen, Ivan Chrilles Zibrandtsen, Troels Wienecke, Troels Wesenberg Kjaer, Mark Schram Christensen, Jens Bo Nielsen, Henning Langberg Source Type: research

P 69 Assessing the relation between brain structure and function during motor imagery in stroke patients and controls using EEG and MRI
Motor imagery (MI) training, in particular in combination with EEG-based neurofeedback (MI-NF), has been suggested as a potential add-on therapy for rehabilitation of upper limb motor impairments after stroke. Most MI-NF implementations are based on the event-related desynchronization (ERD) in the 8 –30Hz frequency range that is typically observed over sensorimotor areas during motor execution and imagination. The amplitude and consistency of the ERD depends, among other things, on brain structure and function during motor imagery (e.g., Halder et al., 2013; Zich et al., 2015).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: J. Meekes, S. Debener, C. Zich, C. Kranczioch Tags: Poster Source Type: research

P 67 Electrophysiological correlates of language improvements after intensive language therapy in patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia
Aphasia affects approximately one third of all stroke patients and may lead to chronic disability. Effective neurorehabilitation programs focusing on improving speech and language in patients with post-stroke aphasia are essential. A better understanding of the neurobiological processes accompanying language deficits and rehabilitation may bear fruit in the advancement of neurorehabilitation programs.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: G. Lucchese, F. Pulverm üller, B. Stahl, F. Dreyer, B. Mohr Tags: Poster Source Type: research

P 66 Transcranial DC stimulation enhances recovery of swallowing function after stroke – a randomized clinical and MEG trial
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation tool that has shown some potential to aid motor rehabilitation following stroke. In the present clinical and neuroimaging study we evaluated whether tDCS is able to speed up the recovery of swallowing function in acute dysphagic stroke patients. Besides relating clinical effects with neuroplastic changes in cortical swallowing processing we aimed to identify factors influencing treatment success.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: S. Suntrup-Kr üger, C. Ringmaier, P. Muhle, R. Dziewas Tags: Poster Source Type: research

P 65 Navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation – therapeutic use in early rehabilitation treatment after stroke
MRI navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) provides a new tool for neuromodulation – we report on its effects on recovery of brain function in a setting of inpatient rehabilitation early after stroke.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: C. Wedekind, H. Weber, P. Rieckmann Tags: Poster Source Type: research

PB 23 Factors predicting global cognitive ability 6month after stroke – preliminary results from the Phys-Stroke trial
Stroke is one of the most frequent causes of chronic and often severe language and motor impairments. Moreover, stroke increases the risk of developing cognitive impairments or even dementia over time (Pendlebury and Rothwell, 2009). Although recent studies investigated predictors of cognitive decline after stroke, several questions remain. In particular, it needs to be clarified whether therapies applied during the rehabilitation phase may reduce or even prevent cognitive decline.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: T. Rackoll, K. Prehn, C. N àjera, L. Doppelbauer, A. Flöel Tags: Poster Blitz Source Type: research

FV 13 Electrophysiological correlates of language recovery – an MEG study of neuroplasticity in chronic post stroke aphasia
Previous studies have demonstrated that efficient language and communication therapy in chronic post stroke aphasia leads to significant clinical language improvements (Pulverm üller et al., 2001) and promotes neuroplasticity. Brain areas frequently associated with functional restitution of language comprise perilesional sites in the left hemisphere (MacGregor et al., 2015) as well as right-hemispheric regions, homotopic to those lesioned in the left (Mohr et al., 2014). To date, however, the neuronal mechanisms underlying therapy-induced language changes and functional restitution are still largely unclear.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: B. Mohr, S. Difrancesco, L. MacGregor, Y. Shtyrov Tags: Free Lecture Source Type: research

P 167 The functional role of contralesional motor areas in the first days after stroke – an fMRI-guided online TMS-study
Neuroimaging studies in stroke patients with hemiparesis have shown altered brain activation in the contralesional hemisphere including the primary motor cortex (M1), dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC) and anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) already in the first week after stroke (Rehme et al., 2011). The role of these regions for motor recovery is still under debate, with some studies suggesting a supportive influence (Lotze et al., 2006) while other point to a maladaptive role (Nowak et al., 2008).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: L. Hensel, C. Tscherpel, J. Freytag, S. Ritter, M. Vollmer, L. Volz, G.R. Fink, C. Grefkes Tags: Poster Source Type: research

P 165 Incidence, clinical characteristics and longterm course of headache in patients with stroke (DMKG multicenter study)
Post stroke headache is a symptom which is generally not further differentiated. According to previous European and American studies, it is a common phenomenon. Nevertheless, other symptoms of stroke, such as palsy or aphasia, are dominating clinical assessments. However, the symptom “headache” can be an essential part of the clinical picture as in subarachnoid bleeding or cerebral venous thrombosis and it is unclear which risk factors modulate the symptoms and the occurrence of headache in stroke.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: S. Dietrich, A. D üring, D. Rothkirch, F. Filippopulos, O. Eren, T. Dresler, T. Buchwald, A. Straube, S. Zierz, G. Goßrau, T. Kraya Tags: Poster Source Type: research

P 163 Combining TMS and EEG – a new tool to assess motor system integrity after stroke
Despite the wealth of neuroimaging studies regarding stroke pathophysiology and recovery after stroke, there is still a lack of clinically relevant biomarkers that allow to predict the potential of functional recovery and treatment response at individuals ’ level. Anovel approach is to test motor system integrity by means of combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG). By recording TMS-evoked potentials (TEP), the cortical response to TMS, both local and network responses can be recorded and analyzed in indivi dual subjects (Rogasch and Fitzgerald, 2012; Ferreri, 2011).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: C. Tscherpel, S. Dern, S. Bender, F. M üller-Dahlhaus, U. Ziemann, G.R. Fink, C. Grefkes Tags: Poster Source Type: research

P 162 Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) as an additional treatment for chronic stroke patients in the outpatient setting: a randomized controlled trial
Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS) is a rhythmic sensory cueing to enhance gait patterns. Aim of the study was to research the effectiveness of RAS as an additional treatment for chronic stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - September 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: A. Sch öler Tags: Poster Source Type: research

S31 Structurally informed analyses of functional connectivity in stroke
Stroke is the leading cause of disability in industrialized countries, has a big impact on quality of life, and is of high socioeconomic relevance. Despite great advances of acute therapy – like thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy – approximately 50% of stroke survivors suffer from permanent neurological deficits, mostly because of structural and functional neural network failure.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Christian Gerloff Source Type: research

O-2-6-15. Immediate effects of anodal tDCS combined with patterned electrical stimulation on gait performance in patients with stroke
This study aimed to examine the immediate effects of anodal tDCS combined with PES on gait performance in patients with stroke. Twelve patients with subacute stroke participated in this double-masked, sham-controlled cross-over study. They randomly participated in the following sessions on separate days: (1) anodal tDCS+PES; (2) anodal tDCS+sham PES; (3) sham tDCS+PES.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tomofumi Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki Fujiwara, Kazuhei Maeda, Tsuyoshi Tatemoto, Shigeo Tanabe, Yoko Takahashi, Katsuhiro Mizuno, Yoshihisa Masakado, Meigen Liu Source Type: research

O204 Simultaneous bi-hemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for upper limb motor recovery in chronic stroke: A double blind placebo controlled study
repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising intervention for the treatment of post-stroke motor deficits. Since the crucial role of non-primary motor cortices and contralesional brain areas is emerging for motor recovery in chronic stroke; we assessed safety and efficacy of bilateral rTMS over the motor areas associated to physical training (PT) on upper extremity (UE) motor function.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Raffaella Chieffo, Giuseppe Scopelliti, Mario Fichera, Giovanni Di Maggio, Roberto Santangelo, Simone Guerrieri, Elise Houdayer, Abraham Zangen, Giancarlo Comi, Letizia Leocani Source Type: research

S186 Effect of reciprocal pedaling exercise on cortical reorganization and gait in stroke patients
Functional impairment of the lower limb is a major complication in stroke patients. The involvement of the cortex in pedaling has critical clinical implications to control of cyclical motor functions in patients with damaged cortical structures or cortical pathways.The study aimed at determining the effect of reciprocal pedaling exercise (RPE) on the gait and cortical reorganization in the stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Mahmoud Rezk, Moshera Darweesh, Mohamed ElTamawy, Mye Basheer Source Type: research

S185 The effect of bilateral arm training on motor areas excitability in chronic stroke patients
Physical therapy exercises that do not enhance motor areas neuroplasticity lead to motor impairment especially at the upper extremity (UE) in the chronic stroke patients. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of using bilateral arm training on motor areas excitability (neuroplasticity) in the chronic stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Walaa Ragab, Moshera Darwish, Mohamed El Tamawy, Ann Abdel Kader Source Type: research

S184 Effect of different frequencies of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cognitive function in stroke
To evaluate the effect of different frequencies of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation( rTMS) on cognitive function in stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Heba Raafat, Ebtisam Fahmy, Sandra Ahmed, Abdulaleem Atteya, Tahani Mousa Source Type: research

O174 Preliminary results of testing the recoveriX system on stroke patients
Motor imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) extract the movement intentions of subjects in real-time and can be used to control a cursor or medical devices. In the last years, the control of functional electrical stimulation (FES) devices drew researchers ’ attention for the post-stroke rehabilitation field. In here, a patient can use the movement imagery to artificially induce movements of the paretic arms through FES in real-time.Five patients who had a stroke that affected the motor system participated in the current study, and were trained acro ss 10 to 24 sessions lasting about 40min each with the recoveriX® system.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Danut Irimia, Rupert Ortner, Francisco Fernandes, Christoph Guger, Alexander Heilinger, Martin Walchshofer, Johannes Gruenwald Source Type: research

P295 Effects of functional electric stimulation and task specific training on gait recovery in patients with stroke: Randomized controlled trial
This work was designed to assess the effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) combined with task specific training on gait recovery in stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Salma Marzouk, Amr Hassan, Mohamed Marzouk, Moshira Darweesh, Rasha Nazeer Source Type: research

Stretch-reflex threshold modulation during active elbow movements in post-stroke survivors with spasticity
Spasticity is a common complication of stroke, occurring in ∼20-50% of patients in the first year (Wissel et al., 2013) and often associated with other sensory and motor impairments (e.g., muscle weakness, loss of dexterity). Spasticity is generally assessed by resistance or EMG responses to passive muscle stretches and has been attributed to exaggerated s pinal stretch reflexes (SRs) and alterations in intrinsic muscle properties (Dietz and Sinkjaer, 2007). For example, motor units of spastic muscles often have an impaired ability to relax (Lewek et al., 2007), prolonged spontaneous firing (Mottram et al., 2010) and low...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 3, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Nicolas A. Turpin, Anatol G. Feldman, Mindy F. Levin Source Type: research

Applying a pelvic corrective force induces forced use of the paretic leg and improves paretic leg EMG activities of individuals post-stroke during treadmill walking
Walking dysfunction is one of the commonly reported physical limitations after stroke (Perry et al., 1995). Individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis typically demonstrate slow gait velocity, reduced stride and step length, and both decreased period of stance and increased period of swing of the paretic leg (Balaban and Tok, 2014; Patterson et al., 2010a). As walking dysfunction can increase the risk of falls (Hausdorff et al., 2001), restrict functional mobility and negatively affect quality of life (Maclean et al., 2000; Perry et al., 1995; Schmid et al., 2007), an important goal of stroke rehabilitation is to improve sym...
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - July 31, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Chao-Jung Hsu, Janis Kim, Rongnian Tang, Elliot J. Roth, William Z. Rymer, Ming Wu Source Type: research

Need for updating safety recommendations on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke patients
A paper entitled “Inhibition versus facilitation of contralesional motor cortices in stroke: Deriving a model to tailor brain stimulation” was published by Sankarasubramanian et al. in Clinical Neurophysiology in March 2017 (Sankarasubramanian et al., 2017). That article reported the results of a study that aime d at investigating whether facilitation of contralesional dorsal premotor cortex by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) permitted to improve upper-limb function in severely affected post-stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - June 2, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Bertrand Glize, Dominique Guehl, M élanie Cogné Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to “Need for updating safety recommendations on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke patients”
We are pleased to receive the correspondence from Glize et al. in regards to our paper published recently in Clinical Neurophysiology (Sankarasubramanian et al., 2017). We thank the authors for their interest and insightful comments regarding approaches used in our study. In brief, our study investigated the effectiveness of facilitating excitability of the contralesional dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) in patients severely affected by stroke. PMd was targeted using high-frequency (5 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - June 2, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ela B. Plow, Vishwanath Sankarasubramanian, Kelsey A. Potter-Baker, Yin-Liang Lin Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

EP 2. Pyramidal tract FA predicts motor outcome in subacute stroke patients after a three week period of arm ability training for ADL-relevant hand motor tests
Outcome prediction after motor stroke for the acute to subacute phase can be consulted for individual therapy modification. For the outcome of severely impaired patients the intactness of the pyramidal tract descending from the lesioned hemisphere (ipsilesional; i) has been described as an important parameter for upper limb strength as a measure of motor outcome (Stinear et al., 2012). In addition, in chronic stroke fractional anisotrophy (FA) of the pyramidal tract is predictive for hand motor impairment in strength (Lindenberg et al., 2010).
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 5, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: M. Domin, S. Roschka, U. Horn, T. Platz, M. Lotze Tags: ePoster Presentations – Stroke Source Type: research

EP 1. Brain activity after acute left hemispheric stroke in imitation and tool associated actions
Apraxia, a disorder of higher motor control, frequently leads to impaired tool use or imitation capacities due to left hemispheric lesions. However, despite similar lesion size or location, patients present with different apraxic deficits thus different early reorganization mechanism may be assumed. To understand the impaired praxis network after stroke on a functional level, we correlated behavioral performance in imitation and tool use tasks with activation patterns in fMRI of 47 acute left-hemispheric stroke patients.
Source: Clinical Neurophysiology - August 5, 2016 Category: Neuroscience Authors: A. Dressing, L. Beume, C.S. M. Schmidt, D. K ümmerer, T. Bormann, I. Mader, M. Rijntjes, C.P. Kaller, C. Weiller, M. Martin Tags: ePoster Presentations – Stroke Source Type: research