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Total 157 results found since Jan 2013.

Blood pressure drugs work far better if taken at night, study shows
‘Chronotherapy’ benefits of bedtime doses discovered in huge trialTaking blood pressure medication at bedtime rather than on waking halves the risk of events such as heart attack and stroke, a major study has revealed.Experts say the findings could potentially transform the way such medications are prescribed, but questions remain, not least why taking the medication at night has such a profound effect.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Heart disease Society Heart attack Medical research Science Spain Stroke Source Type: news

Scores more heart attacks and strokes on high pollution days, figures show
Data reveals acute impact on people ’s health and the strain it puts on emergency servicesScores of children and adults are being rushed to hospital for emergency treatment on days of high pollution in cities across England, figures show.Each year emergency services see more than 120 additional cardiac arrests, more than 230 additional strokes and nearly 200 more people with asthma requiring hospital treatment on days of high pollution compared with the average on days of lower pollution.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Air pollution Heart attack Stroke Asthma Health Environment Society UK news Source Type: news

Heart attacks and the efficacy of polypills – a hard pill to swallow? | Letters
Dr Peter Trewby questions the risk-reduction figures of the Iran study andOliver Lepen says the focus must be on preventing disease, not medicationYour headline (Single polypill reduces risk of heart attacks and strokes, study finds, 23 August) should really have been tempered by quoting the absolute rather than the relative risk-reduction figures.The 34% reduction in major cardiac events you quote is calculated from “on the ground” reduction in events from 8.8% over five years in those not on the polypill to 5.9% in those receiving it – that is a 2.9% chance of benefit over five years to the individual and with no e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Drugs Health Society Science Heart disease Heart attack Stroke Medical research Medicine Pharmaceuticals industry Source Type: news

Single polypill reduces risk of heart attacks and strokes, study finds
Large trial held in Iran of inexpensive medication combining four common drugsA cheap, single pill taken once a day that combines four common drugs is safe and reduces the risk of events such as heart attacks, strokes and sudden death in people over the age of 50, research has found.The study, the first large-scale trial to date, looked at the effectiveness of a so-called polypill – a four-in-one therapy containing drugs to lower cholesterol and blood pressure that was first proposed more than 15 years ago. The researchers found those taking the polypill had a more than 30% lower risk of serious heart problems than those...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Heart disease Heart attack Stroke Health Pharmaceuticals industry Drugs Science Iran Source Type: news

Insomniacs may be at greater risk of heart failure, study finds
People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of stroke and coronary artery diseasePeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news

Cardiovascular disease risk greater in people prone to insomnia - study
People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of heart failure and stroke, say researchersPeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news

Device could bring both solar power and clean water to millions
Researchers say one invention could solve two problems for people lacking basic resourcesA device that can produce electricity from sunlight while simultaneously purifying water has been produced by researchers, an invention they say could solve two problems in one stroke.The researchers say the device is not only a source of green energy but also offers an alternative to current technologies for purifying water. These, they add, often consume large amounts of electricity and require infrastructure beyond the reach of many communities that lack basic access to safe drinking water – a situation thought to affect more than...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Water Global health Solar power Renewable energy Environment World news Source Type: news

Mystery of why arteries harden may have been solved, say scientists
Study finds calcium deposits are triggered by molecule produced by damaged cellsThe mysterious mechanism behind the hardening of arteries may have been solved, researchers have revealed, in a study that also suggests the first potential preventive drug for the condition linked to heart attack, dementia and stroke.Arteries harden as calcium becomes deposited in the elastic walls of the vessels, a process that happens as we age and is exacerbated for patients with diabetes or kidney disease. Stiffening can also occur as calcium becomes deposited in fatty plaques in the arteries – a condition called atherosclerosis.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Science Heart attack Society Dementia Stroke UK news Source Type: news

Up to 25 cups of coffee a day safe for heart health, study finds
High consumption of coffee no worse for arteries than drinking less than a cup a dayCoffee lovers who drink up to 25 cups a day can rest assured the drink is not bad for their heart, scientists say.Some previous studies have suggested that coffee stiffens arteries, putting pressure on the heart and increasing the likelihood of a heart attack or stroke, with drinkers warned to cut down their consumption.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Coffee Heart disease Food Health Heart attack Society Medical research Science Stroke UK news Source Type: news

Heavily processed food like ready meals and ice-cream linked to early death
Two major studies add to body of evidence against foods made with industrial ingredientsPeople who eat large amounts of heavily processed foods, from breakfast cereals and ready meals to muffins and ice-cream, have a greater risk of heart attack, stroke and early death, according to two major studies.The findings, from separate teams in France and Spain, add to a growing body of evidence that foods made in factories with industrial ingredients may have a hand in an array of medical disorders such as cancer, obesity and high blood pressure.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Health Diets and dieting Food Obesity Heart disease Life and style Source Type: news

Even low alcohol consumption is bad news for strokes – study
Moderate drinking of one or two glasses a day does not protect against stroke, say researchersA low level of alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke, new research suggests, in the latest blow to the idea that a few drinks can be beneficial to health.At least100,000 people have strokes in the UK every year, according to recent figures. It had been thought that low levels of alcohol consumption might have a protective effect against stroke, as well as other diseases and conditions. Now researchers say that in the case of stroke, even low levels of alcohol consumption are bad news.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Stroke Science Alcohol Health Society UK news Source Type: news

Low booze consumption does not protect people from strokes, study finds
Moderate drinking of one or two glasses a day does not protect against stroke, say researchersA low level of alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke, new research suggests, in the latest blow to the idea that a few drinks can be beneficial to health.At least100,000 people have strokes in the UK every year, according to recent figures. It had been thought that low levels of alcohol consumption might have a protective effect against stroke, as well as other diseases and conditions. Now researchers say that in the case of stroke, even low levels of alcohol consumption are bad news.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Stroke Science Alcohol Health Society UK news Source Type: news

Parkinson's patients have tubes placed in brain in protein study
New drug-delivery system could also be used to treat brain tumours and strokesPeople with Parkinson ’s disease have been fitted with an implant that can deliver drugs directly to the brain through a port in the side of their head, in a pioneering study.The device was used to send a naturally occurring protein, which it is hoped may help restore cells damaged by the disease, to an affected part of the brain.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Parkinson's disease Stroke Medical research Science Society UK news Neuroscience Source Type: news

'Fake news and ageism' keeping statins from older people
Offering statins to all over-75s could prevent 8,000 deaths from heart failure and stroke, researchers sayThousands of deaths and the wrecking of many lives by disability could be averted if doctors routinely offered a daily statin pill to older people, scientists say.They blame misinformation about the side-effects of statins, together with society ’s ageism, for the low uptake among older people, who are at highest risk of heart attacks, heart failure and stroke.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Statins Heart attack Heart disease Stroke Older people Health Medical research Society Science UK news Source Type: news

Daily aspirin unlikely to help healthy older people live longer, study finds
Researchers say drug has little benefit when taken by healthy people aged over 70Millions of healthy people who take aspirin to ward off illness in old age are unlikely to benefit from the drug, a trial has found.While a daily dose of the blood-thinning medicine can protect older people who have previously experienced heart attacks, strokes and angina, researchers found the drug did not extend the lifespan of healthy people over the age of 70.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Aspirin Health Science Heart disease Heart attack Stroke Older people World news Source Type: news

Four in five adults at risk of early death, heart-age test shows
Doctors call figures for England alarming and urge people to adopt healthier lifestylesHow do I find out my heart age?Four out of five adults have hearts that are more damaged than they should be for their age, putting them at greater risk of early death, a major study has shown.The disclosure prompted calls for Britons to ditch their unhealthy lifestyles and monitor their own health more closely in order to reduce their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Health policy editor Tags: Heart disease Health Heart attack Health policy Medical research UK news Source Type: news

Suffering stroke can double risk of dementia, study finds
Scientists call for more investment in promoting healthy lifestyle after discovering strong link between diseasesHaving a stroke can double the risk of developing dementia, say scientists, who are calling for more effort to be invested in promoting the healthy lifestyles that reduce the chances of stroke.A team from Exeter University has analysed data on stroke and dementia risk from 48 separate studies involving a total of 3.2 million people around the world.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Medical research Stroke Society Science Dementia Mental health Source Type: news

Study of teenage drinkers and smokers shows 'significant damage' to arteries
Teenagers who smoke or consume alcohol have much stiffer arteries than those who don ’t, putting them on the path to heart disease and strokeThe arteries of teenagers who binge drink or smoke are already stiffer by the age of 17 than in those who abstain, new research has revealed.Arterial stiffness indicates damage to the blood vessels. Research in older adults has previously shown that the stiffening of arteries is linked to heart and circulatory disease and an increased risk of events such as heart attack or stroke. While our arteries stiffen as we age, it is known that a host of behaviours are linked to the effect, i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Alcohol Health Smoking Science Society Children Source Type: news

Six to eight hours of sleep best for the heart, says study
Research shows sleep deprivation or excessive hours in bed increase risk of coronary artery disease or strokeSix to eight hours of sleep a night is most beneficial for the heart, while more or less than that could increase the risk of coronary artery disease or a stroke, researchers have suggested.The study, presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich, indicates sleep deprivation and excessive hours in bed should be avoided for optimum heart health.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Medical research Health UK news Society Sleep & wellbeing Science Life and style Source Type: news

Vote now for your favourite Space Force logo! | First Dog on the Moon
Is this a propaganda master stroke, a legitimate safeguard against Chinese hegemony beyond Earth ’s atmosphere or complete babbling nonsense?Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are publishedGet all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and printsContinue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: First Dog on the Moon Tags: Space US news Donald Trump Source Type: news

Salt not as damaging to health as previously thought, says study
New research reignites a row with scientists who want to reduce salt intake to near zeroSalt may not be as damaging to health as is usually claimed, according to a controversial new study which suggests campaigns to persuade people to cut down may only be worthwhile in countries with very high sodium consumption, such as China.The World Health Organization recommends cutting sodium intake to no more than 2g a day – the equivalent of 5g of salt – because of the link to increased blood pressure, which is in turn implicated in stroke.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Science Health Diets and dieting Medical research Nutrition Food & wellbeing Heart attack Source Type: news

Omega-3 no protection against heart attack or strokes, say scientists
Supplements do not offer cardiovascular benefits, researchers conclude from trials involving 112,000 peopleThe widespread belief that taking omega-3 capsules will help protect you from a heart attack, stroke or early death is wrong, according to a large and comprehensive review of the evidence.Thousands of people take omega-3 supplements regularly and for years. The belief that it protects the heart has spread – and is promoted in the marketing of the supplements – because the results from early trials suggested the capsules had cardiovascular benefits.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Health Medical research Food & drink Heart attack Stroke Science Life and style Society Source Type: news

A stroke nearly killed me. Now I'm clinging to life against the odds | Rachel Capps
At first blinking was hard. But I worked at it, fighting my brain. Every task is an effort, but I ’m committed to getting betterHalf a day. That ’s all it took. Half a day turned my world upside down. My life as a mother, with dreams of building a successful law practice and growing another hobby business. And throughout, aspirations to write.All gone. Flipped in half a day.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Capps Tags: Stroke Neuroscience Disability Health Source Type: news

Scientists seek drug to ‘rewire’ adult brain after stroke
Therapies may one day enable healthy part of brain to take over tasks from damaged areasAdults who have experienced a stroke may one day be able to take a drug to help their brain “rewire” itself, so that tasks once carried out by now-damaged areas can be taken over by other regions, researchers have claimed.The ability for the brain to rewire, so-called “brain plasticity”, is thought to occur throughout life; however, while children have a high degree of brain plasticity, adult brains are generally thought to be less plastic.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Stroke Medical research UK news Science Health Source Type: news

Blood-thinning drugs designed to cut stroke risk may actually increase it
Scientists call for caution in prescribing anticoagulants after some patients with other conditions found to suffer more strokesBlood-thinning drugs may increase rather than cut the risk of stroke in some people over 65 who have an irregular heartbeat and also chronic kidney disease, according to a new study.The researchers are calling on doctors to be more cautious in prescribing the drugs, called anticoagulants, until there has been more research.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Medical research Stroke Drugs Health Science Society Doctors Source Type: news

Even one cigarette a day greatly raises cardiovascular risk, experts warn
Impact of one daily cigarette on risk of heart disease and stroke greater than previously thoughtSmoking just one cigarette a day is more dangerous than commonly thought, say researchers who have found it still raises the risk of coronary heart disease or stroke to about half the risk from smoking 20 a day.The team behind the study say that the findings emphasise that cutting out cigarettes, rather than just cutting down, is necessary to dramatically reduce the chance of cardiovascular problems – akey cause of premature death among smokers.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Smoking Heart disease Society Health Stroke Medical research Science Source Type: news

Stroke: when words fail you
As BBC4 film Speechless marks World Stroke Day, documentary producer Nick Fraser reflects on his own recovery following a brain attack in FebruaryI was just finishing a talk about documentaries I was giving in Soho. I ’d been asked a question about why so many films are seriously depressing. I remember that I talked about the great neurosurgeon Henry Marsh and the documentary about him,The English Surgeon. The film followed him to Ukraine as he helped and taught the local surgeons, who often resorted to using rusty domestic power tools to work on their patients ’ skulls. I’d talked about him for some time, enthusiast...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nick Fraser Tags: Stroke Medical research Science Society Documentary Television & radio Factual TV BBC4 Media Source Type: news

Blood-thinning drugs 'can reduce risk of dementia by up to 48%'
Research ‘strongly suggests’ that patients taking anticoagulants for irregular heartbeat could be protected against dementia and strokeBlood-thinning drugs could protect against dementia and stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, research suggests.Related:Long working days can cause heart problems, study saysContinue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Medical research Dementia Stroke Heart disease Heart attack Society Drugs Science Health Mental health Source Type: news

High-risk patients being underprescribed statins, study finds
Cholesterol-lowering drugs are also being overprescribed to people at low risk of having a heart attack or stroke, researchers findStatins are being overprescribed to low-risk groups and underprescribed to high-risk groups, research by the British Journal of General Practice (BJGP) has shown.The report found potential “undertreatment” among people who have at least a 20% chance of cardiovascular disease (CVD) within a decade, who are considered high-risk patients.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mattha Busby Tags: Statins Society Heart attack Medical research Stroke UK news Science Source Type: news

Stroke patients in Wales ‘could die’ because thrombectomy not available
Acute shortage in NHS of specialist doctors who undertake life-saving treatment means hospitals cannot provide itStroke patients in Wales are being denied a life-saving pioneering treatment after the surgical team providing it had to be mothballed because of an acute NHS shortage of the specialist doctors who undertake the procedure.Internal NHS emails obtained by the Guardian reveal that health service bosses in Wales are pleading with hospitals in England to perform mechanical thrombectomy on their patients to save them from disability and death.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Health policy editor Tags: Stroke NHS Wales Health Medical research Society Doctors Science UK news Source Type: news

MRI scan that can predict stroke risk has 'promise to save lives'
Scientists at Oxford University develop non-invasive technique to measure amount of cholesterol in carotid plaquesA new type of MRI scan can predict the risk of having astroke, researchers have said in a study.The non-invasive technique, developed by scientists at the University of Oxford, predicts whether plaques in the carotid arteries are rich in cholesterol and therefore more likely to cause a stroke.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Stroke Society Health UK news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Coffee cuts risk of dying from stroke and heart disease, study suggests
Coffee a day keeps the doctor away? Perhaps, but benefits may be down to lifestyles rather than the brew itself, researchers sayPeople who drink coffee have a lower risk of dying from a host of causes, including heart disease, stroke and liver disease, research suggests – but experts say it’s unclear whether the health boost is down to the brew itself.The connection, revealed in two large studies, was found to hold regardless of whether the coffee was caffeinated or not, with the effect higher among those who drank more cups of coffee a day.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Coffee Science Food & drink Life and style Health Society UK news Source Type: news

Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds
Consumption of even full-fat dairy products does not increase risk, international team of experts saysConsuming cheese, milk and yoghurt – even full-fat versions – does not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to research that challenges the widely held belief that dairy products can damage health.The findings, from an international team of experts, contradict the view that dairy products can be harmful because of their high saturated fat content. The experts dismiss that fear as “a misconception [and] mistaken belief”.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Health policy editor Tags: Health Heart attack Stroke Milk Cheese Medical research Food & drink Life and style Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Skin patch costing 39p could save lives of stroke victims, researchers say
Trials show patch significantly increases chances of survival when rapidly applied by paramedics during journey to hospitalA skin patch costing as little as 39p could revolutionisestroke treatment, significantly increasing the chances of survival, researchers have found.The patch contains glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), which lowers blood pressure and opens up blood vessels, helping reduce the damage caused in the immediate minutes and hours following a stroke.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Health Stroke Medical research UK news Science Society Source Type: news

Deadly spider venom could ward off stroke brain damage, say doctors
Ingredient in funnel web spider venom can protect cells from being destroyed by a stroke, even when given hours after the event, study showsDoctors have stumbled on an unlikely source for a drug to ward off brain damage caused by strokes: the venom of one of the deadliest spiders in the world.A bite from an Australian funnel web spider cankill a human in 15 minutes, but a harmless ingredient found in the venom can protect brain cells from being destroyed by a stroke, even when given hours after the event, scientists say.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Science Society Spiders Stroke Source Type: news

In search of the stroke detector
Up to 50% of stroke diagnoses are inaccurate. What if a small biosensor could do the job precisely? Robert McCrum, who survived a ‘brain attack’ 22 years ago, traces one team’s long journey to a breakthroughStroke, or “brain attack”, is the third biggest killer in the western world, after cancer and heart failure. The life-changing effects associated with this simple, Anglo-Saxon word are readily explained: a stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disrupted by a blood vessel either bursting or blocking, so that the part of the brain supplied by this blood vessel dies.The brain is a much more com...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robert McCrum Tags: Medical research Health NHS Biochemistry and molecular biology Neuroscience Society Source Type: news

Stroke patients in UK 'missing out on treatment for brain clots'
Thousands of patients not being offered procedure that can dramatically reduce disability after a stroke, research suggestsThousands of stroke patients in the UK may be missing out on a treatment that involves physically unplugging blood vessels in the brain, research suggests.Scientists estimate that about 9,000 patients with blood clots in the brain – a tenth of the total – could benefit from mechanical thrombectomy (MT) each year. Currently, fewer than 600 patients a year undergo the procedure.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Health Society UK news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Air pollution now major contributor to stroke, global study finds
Scientists say finding is alarming, and shows that harm caused by air pollution to the lungs, heart and brain has been underestimatedAir pollution has become a major contributor to stroke for the first time, with unclean air now blamed for nearly one third of the years of healthy life lost to the condition worldwide.In an unprecedented survey of global risk factors for stroke, air pollution in the form of fine particulate matter ranked seventh in terms of its impact on healthy lifespan, while household air pollution from burning solid fuels ranked eighth. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 10, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Pollution Health Medical research Environment Society Source Type: news

Taking aspirin quickly after minor stroke 'can cut risk of recurrence'
Urgent treatment with blood-thinning drug greatly reduces risk of subsequent fatal or disabling stroke, research findsDeath and disability can be averted by quickly taking aspirin after a minor stroke, a study has found. The blood-thinning drug is already given to people who have suffered a transient ischaemic attack (TIA), or “mini-stroke”, after they have been assessed in hospital. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 19, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Medical research Aspirin UK news Science Health Source Type: news

Loneliness linked to 30% increase in heart disease and stroke risk
Researchers say analysis backs up public health concerns about importance of social contacts for health and wellbeingLoneliness and social isolation have been linked to a 30% increase in the risk of having a stroke or coronary artery disease, the two major causes of death and illness in wealthy societies.In findings which compared the effects of loneliness with recognised risk factors, such as anxiety and a stressful job, researchers said that their analysis backed up public health concerns about the importance of social contacts for health and wellbeing. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 20, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ben Quinn Tags: Medical research Science UK news Older people Society Source Type: news

Electrical brain stimulation could boost benefits of stroke rehabilitation
Research indicates that transcranial direct current stimulation (tCDS) during rehabilitation therapy might help stroke patients recover more movementElectrical brain stimulation could benefit stroke patients by boosting the effects of rehabilitation therapy, new research suggests.Writing in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the authors reveal that patients who were given electrical brain stimulation during a rehabilitation programme performed better on a range of tasks than those taking part in the rehabilitation programme. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Church of England defends prayer tweet for Richard Dawkins after stroke
Twitter users accuse church of ‘trolling’ the famous atheist, but it insists it was wholly genuine in its concern for Dawkins’ healthThe Church of England has said a tweet it posted sending prayers for secularist Richard Dawkins after he had a stroke was genuine. On Friday, the Church tweeted “prayers for Prof Dawkins and his family” in response to a post by the Independent reporting on his health. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Bonnie Malkin Tags: Richard Dawkins Religion Twitter Anglicanism Christianity World news UK news Source Type: news

Richard Dawkins has stroke, forcing cancellation of Australia and New Zealand tour
Management for 74-year-old author of The God Delusion say he suffered ‘minor stroke’ in UK on Saturday but has already returned home from hospitalRichard Dawkins has had a stroke on the eve of his tour of Australia and New Zealand.Management for the 74-year-old author of The God Delusion said he had suffered a “minor stroke” in the UK on Saturday but had already returned home from hospital. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Calla Wahlquist Tags: Richard Dawkins Books Atheism Source Type: news

Richard Dawkins stroke forces delay of Australia and New Zealand tour
Author of The God Delusion suffered ‘minor stroke’ in UK and is now recuperating at homeRichard Dawkins has had a stroke on the eve of his tour of Australia and New Zealand. Related: Richard Dawkins interview: 'It must be possible to construct life chemically, or in a computer' Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Calla Wahlquist Tags: Richard Dawkins Books Atheism Source Type: news

Noisy roads linked to higher stroke risk
Study finds elevated hospital admission rate among patients who live where traffic noise exceeds world health standards by five decibels or moreLiving in a neighbourhood with noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy and increase the risk of stroke, doctors have reported in a study.Researchers compared noise levels and data for deaths and hospital admissions across London, they said in a paper published in the European Heart Journal. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 24, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse in Paris Tags: Health Society Medical research World news Source Type: news

My Beautiful Broken Brain review - moving study of life after stroke
This study of a young stroke patient’s struggle to regain language and memory manages to be at once visually arresting, deeply moving and upliftingMy Beautiful Broken Brain is the story of stroke patient Lotje Sodderland. Sodderland suffered a catastrophic brain haemorrhage in 2011 at the age of 34; eight days later she contacted filmmaker Sophie Robinson to ask her to help document the aftermath. The pair initially filmed 150 hours of footage, most of it self-shot by Sodderland on her iPhone, which was edited to create this documentary piecing together Sodderland’s recovery. Related: 'I felt as if I had become fear it...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 10, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Katy Vans Tags: Sheffield Doc/Fest Neuroscience Film Health Source Type: news

Long-term depression in over-50s could double stroke risk, study finds
US study of more than 16,000 people suggests damage is done by depressive symptoms accumulating over timeLong-term depression in people over 50 could more than double their risk of suffering a stroke, with the risk remaining significantly higher even after the depression allays, research suggests.The US study of more than 16,000 people, which documented 1,192 strokes, found that onset of recent depression was not associated with higher stroke risk, suggesting the damage is done by depressive symptoms accumulating over time. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 14, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Medical research Depression UK news US news Science Society World news Source Type: news

Stroke treatment improves patients' chances of avoiding brain damage
New Australian-led research at Royal Melbourne hospital is set to change treatment standards around the worldPeople who suffer a severe stroke could soon be twice as likely to avoid serious brain damage and return to living independently, thanks to Australian-led research set to change treatment standards around the world.Researchers at Royal Melbourne hospital combined a new minimally invasive clot-removal procedure with the standard treatment for stroke, which involves administering a clot-dissolving drug. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 18, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Health Australia news Medical research Melbourne World news Source Type: news

How can closing stroke units improve survival rates?
According to a paper published in the BMJ, the future just got a little brighter for victims of stroke and London is leading the way Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 6, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Richard P Grant Tags: Medical research Science Medicine NHS London Greater Manchester Health Health policy Society Source Type: news

High-fibre diet can cut stroke risk, scientists claim
Research finds every 7g increase in daily fibre cuts risk of first-time stroke by 7% Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Medical research Health & wellbeing Food drink Life and style Science Source Type: news